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Homonyms Quiz #3

We give you a pair of definitions. You guess the homonym.
  • Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings.
  • Includes both true and polysemous homonyms
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Jul 19, 2014
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Meanings
Answer
Sense of self-worth
Group of lions
Student
Eye part
Seat of government
Uppercase letter
Pelvis part
Trendy
Leaf gathering device
Cad
Unit of bread
To laze about
To bombard
Turtle's carapace
Type of precipitation
To salute or praise
Charge to enter a club
To record another
musician's song
Offspring born
at the same time
To improperly
dispose of trash
Meanings
Answer
Timepiece
To look at
Part of the year
To flavor
To fish
Geometric property
Ursine animal
Stock market pessimist
Metallic element
Slang for police officer
Book part
Teenager who assists
at Congress
River's edge
Money storage location
Barrel
Percussion instrument
Lock opener
Piano part
To raise
Butt
Answer Stats
Meaning #1
Meaning #2
Answer
% Correct
Your %
(22)
Really, really good quiz - even though I did it so badly - brilliant!
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Jul 29, 2012
(20)
Very interesting slang for police officer. o.o!
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Jul 31, 2012
(42)
It's a Britishism
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Feb 28, 2014
(69)
It was used in the USA when I was a kid, but it was more often shortened to "cop". You still see it in some of the old movies. I always heard it came from the copper buttons or badges on policemen's uniforms, but some say it came from the verb "cop" as in to cop a ciminal. It may have originated in the UK but the term has been used in the US for a long time.
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May 22, 2014
(60)
Snopes lists it as: The police-specific use of "cop" made its way into the English language in far more languid fashion. "Cop" has long existed as a verb meaning "to take or seize," but it didn't begin to make the linguistic shifts necessary to turn it into a casual term for "police officer" until the mid-19th century. The first example of 'cop' taking the meaning "to arrest" appeared in 1844, and the word then swiftly moved from being solely a verb for "take into police custody" to also encompassing a noun referring to the one doing the detaining. By 1846, policemen were being described as "coppers," the '-er' ending having been appended to the "arrest" form of the verb, and by 1859 "coppers" were also being called "cops," the latter word a shortening of the former.
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May 22, 2014
(51)
I learned (perhaps incorrectly) that "Copper" came from badges made of copper, worn by the police.
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May 5, 2016
(56)
Cops and Robbers was a favourite game when I was a kid.
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Jan 12, 2017
(44)
How about "brass" ? That's the first slang/metal I thought of.
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Dec 10, 2015
(42)
Brass is more of a military term used to denote Officer ranks
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Feb 19, 2016
(22)
Brass isn't a metallic element. It is a compound made of copper and zinc.
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May 5, 2016
(63)
I have heard Tin being used as slang for a police officer as well. It is a reference to the badge.
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Jan 16, 2017
(13)
Very interesting quiz! Never thought of 'rear' for butt and to raise.
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Jul 31, 2012
(63)
that's the only one that stumped me. sat there thinking about it for most of the allotted time
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Aug 29, 2016
(23)
100% 3:316 left.
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Jul 31, 2012
(44)
To force, shove:__________________/An awkward or clumsy person in a China Shop:_____________________.
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Mar 7, 2015
(21)
Very nice!
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Oct 13, 2012
(71)
Cool quiz. 'Timepiece' and 'To look at' could also be 'clock'.
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Aug 5, 2014
(66)
How? I don't ever see this conversation happening...What are you doing tonight? Not much, probably "clock" a little TV.
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Sep 6, 2014
(60)
Well done, exactly what you *would* say!! Actually, to 'clock' is not so much to watch, as to notice or glimpse something/someone. If you see someone in the street, you could 'clock' them crossing the road, going into a store/bar, etc. It's a much shorter period of observation that to watch.
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Sep 6, 2014
(50)
Clock was my first thought, but then clock is more like see than watch, "did you clock that"
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Sep 6, 2014
(36)
or 'clock out of work'
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Oct 23, 2015
(45)
Yeah clock is more of an urban term for watch "Hey girl, I see you clocking me". A buddy of mine thinks that's a good pick-up line. Sad thing is it seems to work
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Jan 11, 2017
(27)
Enjoyed this one.
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Sep 6, 2014
(66)
Got 20 out of 20, with 2:23 left, but actually whizzed through the first 19 only to spend an inordinate amount of time on "to raise - butt". It being a word with several meanings, "to raise" slowed me way down, as first I was thinking of it as "to lift" as in "raise your glass", THEN went to "to increase" like "raise your salary" or "I'll raise that bet" - took a while to figure out the alternate "to parent" or "to grow" meaning... very cool quiz!
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Sep 6, 2014
(60)
Yeah, that was a good one. It's pretty obvious right away that there were multiple meanings of "to raise", but then I realized there are also multiple meanings of "butt"; all of which are a bit more obscure (to butt, as in what a goat does, or a butt as in a cigarette butt, etc.). Had to go through various options on both sides to figure it out eventually. Good job, QM. :)
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Aug 12, 2016
(67)
The irony that a quiz on homonyms uses homonyms to describe the homonym
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Jan 13, 2017
(56)
Good quiz! Suck that I got 5 wrong, but It's still a really good quiz.
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May 14, 2015
(34)
An angle is not a property of geometry, it is a basic element or maybe call it a figure even. Properties of geometry are theorems or maybe even postulates. They are basically rules that govern why it works.
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May 18, 2015
(60)
You didn't get it did you?
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Jul 29, 2015
(67)
best retort I've seen in a while
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Jan 13, 2017
(63)
It doesn't say "property of geometry" so it's not a property of geometry as a subject as you seem to assume. What it does say is it's a "geometric property" and that's exactly what it is, a property that exists within geometry. for example, I could have a triangle with the following properties: side a) 3cm side b) 4 cm side c) 5 cm, angle AB = 90 degrees, angle AC = 53 degrees, angle BC = 37 degrees. You can use these properties to build an actual triangle, therefore an angle is a property of a triangle. making it a geometric property.
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Aug 29, 2016
(63)
Just when I think I have an easy one. Not so
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Oct 29, 2015
(24)
Homonyms don't always have the same spelling. They are words that sound exactly the same, have a different spelling and mean different things, i.e deer and dear. Where and wear. Hear and here. One and won..these are a few examples.
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Mar 5, 2016
(69)
In my region, where and wear are not homonyms.
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May 5, 2016
(22)
I think you have homonyms and homophones mixed up. homonym - same word, different definition (nym being a suffix of synonym/antonym) homophone - different word, but same way to say it (phone being short for phonic, phonics are sounds to create a word)
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May 5, 2016
(49)
So capital (seat of government) is a homophone of capitol (seat of government building), whereas capital (seat of government) is a homonym of both capital (uppercase letter) and capital (wealth). Got it.
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Jan 11, 2017
(63)
Sigh... you really could have Googled that first. But anyway, if you like homophones better than homonyms, there are homophone quizzes here on JetPunk, too.
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Jun 14, 2016
(69)
Homophones are a type of homonym. Homonyms also include homographs, and some people further break those down into heterographs and oronyms. Some of these also overlap. It was simpler when I was in school. We were taught there were only homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms.
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Jan 11, 2017
(43)
18/20, wasn't quite expecting to get that much... I did miss Rear and Hail though, no idea how I didn't think of them xD
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Jan 11, 2017
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