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Losing Presidential Candidates

Name the candidates who got at least 10% of the vote, but still lost.
  • Republican
    Democratic
    Other
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Nov 09, 2016
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Year
Candidate
2016
2012
2008
2004
2000
1996
1992
1992
1988
1984
1980
1976
1972
1968
1968
1964
1960
1956
1952
1948
1944
1940
1936
Year
Candidate
1932
1928
1924
1924
1920
1916
1912
1912
1908
1904
1900
1896
1892
1888
1884
1880
1876
1872
1868
1864
1860
1860
1860
Year
Candidate
1856
1856
1852
1848
1848
1844
1840
1836
1832
1828
1824
1824
1824
1820
Uncontested
1816
1812
1808
1804
1800
1796
1792
Uncontested
1789
Uncontested
Answer Stats
Year
Candidate
% Correct
Your %
(75)
Completing the top entry of this quiz has given me a certain sense of closure on the 2012 election. Good luck to us all in the next four years.
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Nov 7, 2012
(75)
Four years later and back for another round. We survived the last 4 years, so I suppose we'll make it out alive this time around too. See you in 4 more years!
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Nov 11, 2016
(17)
How did only 98% of people get romney?
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Nov 7, 2012
(68)
He's just that forgettable. I got most back to 1960, and the first few, plus most that ran unsuccessfully for a 2nd term or had an unsuccessful 1st bid before they won. I also got Al Smith just on a complete guess, whoever that is, when I was typing in random common names.
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Jan 6, 2013
(39)
Same for me; I have only been voting since the 90's; so after that I started with other presidents, knowing that some would have lost their first bid, and after that, it was Smith, Parker, etc- common last names (which is also a fun quiz on here too).
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Jul 13, 2014
(58)
Do you remember the name of the losing candidate of last year's elections in Japan? In China? Germany?
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Nov 11, 2016
(68)
Henry Clay, most accomplished loser in presidential history. I remember learning about him in 10th grade history.
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Jan 6, 2013
(44)
You mean loser who didn't end up winning eventually I expect...Henry Clay is an accomplished political figure, but he doesn't rank above John Adams or Thomas Jefferson I would think. As for Adams, I believe that at the time he ran for President he was, and still stands as, the most accomplished person ever to be elected President for the 1st time. He had been the driving force at the Continental Congress in declaring Independence, had gone to Paris and then to Amsterdam to negotiate alliances and was a signatory and negotiator of the Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War, served as the 1st US Ambassador to Great Britain, and was then of course the first Vice President. With all of that to his credit, I would put Adams still to this day as the most qualified man ever elected President. Both he, Jefferson, and some others on the list who were Presidents before or after they lost, are also more accomplished than Clay.
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Mar 27, 2013
(68)
yes, I meant that Clay was a loser in that he repeatedly ran and lost and never actually won. He was much better at losing presidential races than almost anyone unless you want to count people like Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, or Lyndon LaRouche.. but they were never serious contenders.
Of course Clay's accomplishments didn't even come close to matching Adams' or Jefferson's or Roosevelt's, who all later won.
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Jun 1, 2013
(68)
William Jennings Bryan was another one who was always running and losing. I remember learning about him, as well. He's tied with Clay here for most appearances. Though Clay's career of losing elections was longer than Bryan's. He was at it for 20+ years.
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Jun 1, 2013
(70)
Based on what I learned in history class, the biggest injustice to the office of the president was the fact that neither Henry Clay nor William Jennings Bryan held office. Both would have been more competent than the presidents that we had during that time. Perhaps we wouldn't have had a depression in the mid 1800s had Clay been there. Maybe we would have actually had a competent president at the turn of the century instead of a revolving door of one-term buffoons if Bryan took office. Who knows.
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Jun 23, 2015
(43)
If I remember correctly, Bryan not only lost his state and his Congressional district, but the precinct in which he lived in his 1900 defeat by McKinley.
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Jul 3, 2015
(64)
William Jennings Bryan John Scopes monkey trial (look up)
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Nov 22, 2015
(70)
Why the picture of Dewey, just out of curiosity?
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Jul 13, 2016
(64)
When the Republicans nominated him in 1944 Eleanor Roosevelt famously said that he looked like the little man on the top of the wedding cake. And the Chicago Tribune prematurely declared him the winner in 1948, which might cement his role in history as the man who finished second. The Trib still hasn't gotten over it: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/politics/chi-chicagodays-deweydefeats-story-story.html. It probably never will.
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Aug 6, 2016
(68)
Several copies of Newsweek's "Madam President" issue were sold before sales were stopped and the remaining ones recalled. The President Trump issue will be shipped next week. Oops. http://nypost.com/2016/11/09/national-recall-after-newsweek-misfires-with-clinton-cover/
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Nov 11, 2016
(42)
In 1848 Martin Van Buren won 10.1% of the popular vote as the Free Soil candidate
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Oct 30, 2016
Added that. Thanks.
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Nov 9, 2016
(66)
Everyone seems to know about DeWitt Clinton in 1812 now. Is this the luckiest Jetpunk type-in ever?
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Nov 10, 2016
(66)
Hugh Johnson, Times person of the year 1933, gives him a good run for his money.
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Nov 10, 2016
(29)
No, when you type in Clinton, that appears with it.
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Nov 11, 2016
(75)
Yes, we are aware. It was a joke.
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Nov 11, 2016
(35)
Interesting to see the 2012 comments at the last election. Just finished US election and Donald Trump is president. Will be interesting to say the least.
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Nov 11, 2016
(38)
You can get suprisingly far by typing in actual former Presidents. Good on them for not giving up after one go.
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Nov 11, 2016
(60)
Typing Harrison only got me one answer. Just William not Benjamin
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Nov 11, 2016
It gave me both. I blame gremlins.
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Nov 12, 2016
(1)
Hillary Clinton won the popular vote and is therefore not a loser in this election, although the outdated electoral college chose Donald Trump instead. The electoral college made sense when votes had to be transported by horse and buggy and laboriously counted. It no longer does.
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Nov 11, 2016
(38)
Hillary Clinton lost the election. How come you didn't take issue with the electoral college a week ago? Somehow I suspect you wouldn't have taken an issue with the electoral college if Trump had the bigger popular vote and Clinton had won by delegates.
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Nov 13, 2016
(64)
I doubt it somehow. Did you know that in 1969 a Proposal to eliminate the electoral college was passed by the House of Representatives 339 - 70, only to be ignored by the Senate? There has been a movement over the last 20 years to eliminate the Electoral College by way of the National Popular Vote Insterstate Compact. This has been proposed in 40 or so state legislatures but has thusfar only been adopted by strongly leaning Democratic states. This isn't a new passion of Dems, despite the Electoral College being demographically favorable to Obama in 2012. Democrats have tended to favor eliminating the Electoral college for many years along with being against most regulation making voting difficult. In will be interesting in the future to see what the deep dive research says about the effect of this being the first presidential election after the Supreme court tossed out the Voting Rights Act.
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Nov 16, 2016
(58)
The problem is, it has to be replaced by something that both parties can agree on the rules of. And that's pretty unlikely.
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Nov 16, 2016
(59)
Shouldn't Strom Thurmond be on this list? He ran in 1948 as a Dixiecrat and won 39 electoral votes.
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Nov 11, 2016
(42)
Brutal but fun quiz. I got 49% right but 82% percentile overall.
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Nov 11, 2016
(35)
I thought that Aaron Burr tied with Thomas Jefferson in the election of 1800.
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Nov 11, 2016
(48)
Poor old Eugene Debs never made 10%
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Nov 11, 2016
(51)
I managed to be the one dummy who didn't get DeWitt Clinton...
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Nov 12, 2016
(39)
Good quiz!
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Nov 14, 2016
(63)
Makes me want to throw up, having to type Hillary Clinton's name as the losing candidate. God help us the next four years.
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Nov 14, 2016
(38)
Make America Great Again!
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Nov 17, 2016
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