Take another quiz >
thumb

Most Valuable Crops by U.S. State

Name the most valuable crop produced by each of the 50 states.
  • source
  • A crop is a plant that is grown for a human use or animal feed
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Nov 12, 2016
Give Up?
Enter answer here
0 / 12 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored /12 = %.
This beats or equals % of test takers
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Points
You have earned / 5 points for this quiz
This quiz is not eligible for points
Next Level
/
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
×
Help

Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

State
millions of $
Crop
Alabama
241
Alaska
7
Arizona
434
Arkansas
1,467
California
5,325
Colorado
782
Connecticut
22
Delaware
120
Florida
1,173
Georgia
694
Hawaii
49
Idaho
932
Illinois
7,346
Indiana
3,164
Iowa
8,770
Kansas
2,176
Kentucky
856
Louisiana
558
Maine
143
Maryland
236
Massachusetts
77
Michigan
1,174
Minnesota
4,858
Mississippi
1,028
Missouri
1,633
State
millions of $
Crop
Montana
939
Nebraska
6,094
Nevada
196
New Hampshire
16
New Jersey
77
(Bedding Plants)
New Mexico
241
New York
788
North Carolina
703
North Dakota
1,792
Ohio
2,098
Oklahoma
510
Oregon
604
Pennsylvania
1,010
Rhode Island
2
South Carolina
96
South Dakota
2,599
Tennessee
736
Texas
1,609
Utah
392
Vermont
129
Virginia
418
Washington
2,396
West Virginia
135
Wisconsin
1,673
Wyoming
259
Answer Stats
States
Crop
% Correct
Your %
(71)
It's interesting how few of the states that are known for something have that as their biggest dollar crop. Wisconsin grows more cranberries than any other state, yet that's not the biggest cash crop. Likewise most of the states we think of as cotton states have a different top product, Idaho with potatoes, as well as some of the other tobacco states. California is a huge producer of crops, and I knew almonds were in the mix, but surprised they top oranges or the common cash crops.
reply
delete
Nov 12, 2016
(51)
It wouldn't surprise me if oranges used to be California's most valuable crop, but the fields have almost entirely been replaced with suburbs. For example, Orange County has only 71 acres of its namesake left, and most of that is historic parks: http://www.latimes.com/visuals/graphics/la-me-g-the-decline-of-the-orange-20150116-htmlstory.html
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(63)
I would imagine peaches in georgia are similar, in that they used to produce much more than they do now.
delete
May 3, 2017
(77)
I never realized that cotton candy was made out of real cotton
reply
delete
Nov 12, 2016
(68)
According to this data, marijuana crop values exceed that crops stated in this quiz in at least California, Tennessee, Kentucky, Hawaii, Alabama and West Virginia. This is 2006 data, which will have surely gotten higher, if you'll excuse the pun, since then.
reply
delete
Nov 13, 2016
I am generally skeptical of data that comes from political advocacy groups. One problem with most of these "pot is the biggest crop" stories is that they confuse street value with wholesale cost. Surely, there must be better data from the many states where marijuana is legal?
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(47)
Crazy that almonds are worth more to California than grapes, both for eating and wine production. I guess most table grapes come from Mexico.
reply
delete
Nov 15, 2016
(69)
Almonds are expensive, too.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(79)
Is maple not considered a crop? Vermont's maple syrup industry is over $300M.
reply
delete
Jan 2, 2017
(55)
Good question. Must be that since you don't actually go out and plant maple trees, wait thirty years, and then start tapping them for maple syrup, it's not considered a 'crop'. It's a product from biological activity but it's more like a mineral resource that you go out into the woods to extract.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(55)
The numbers I found is more like $49 million (2013).
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(50)
I was expecting Pineapple for Hawaii. Literally 98% of the island of Lanai is Pineapple Farms
reply
delete
Apr 10, 2017
(69)
Surprised me, too. Though coffee was my second guess.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(71)
We spent a week on Kaua'i, enjoying the free coffee every morning at Kauai Coffee plantation. I guessed pineapples, sugar cane, papayas, guavas, taro... but no coffee. Only one I missed. :(
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(55)
Idaho really throws you for a loop. Not what I expected!
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(73)
Was going through the obvious answers, or so I thought, and had to do a double take when potatoes showed up under Maine instead of Idaho.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(55)
Maine is just as famous for potatoes as Idaho, but is quite a bit smaller and doesn't have nearly as much cultivated land. Aroostook County (the largest county in the country east of Wyoming), which occupies a good part of northern Maine, has huge expanses of potato fields.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(71)
I wonder how many people would have missed hay if it hadn't been the crop in the photo? Even with the photo it's currently at 41%.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(51)
It's because most of us don't see it in our everyday lives, we just see the end products in our grocery store meat section :P
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(53)
I imagine most people saw it and thought, "wheat," and didn't realize there is a difference between the two.
reply
delete
May 3, 2017
(68)
That's not a wheat crop - looks like lucerne to me (alfalfa to you Americans)
delete
May 3, 2017
(44)
Well, my parents would always go "Look, giant shredded wheat!" out the car window when I was little and it was hay baling season... and then I tried to take a bite of a hay bale when I was six and found out the hard way. :P
delete
May 20, 2017
(51)
Out here where I live in NC all you see are rolling fields of tobacco. Occasionally some soy and cotton, but mainly tobacco.
reply
delete
May 8, 2017
(44)
Very true; I'm from southern Virginia, and tobacco used to be just like that here, too. But I've noticed it's been on a sharp decline since the middle of last decade. Farmers around here who used to grow it are switching to more profitable crops since our state's crazy tax increases on the plant that has such a rich history here. When I drive through NC, though, it's a different story altogether.
reply
delete
May 19, 2017
×
Congrats!
You have reached a new level
To save this level, you'll have to
create an account
×
Congrats!
You have earned a new badge
To save this badge, you'll have to
create an account