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Random French Words #2

Translate these common French words into English.
  • All the answers are a single word
  • If multiple answers fit, guess the most common
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Oct 07, 2016
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French
English
Rouge
Deux
Bon
Très
Bienvenue
Fin
Année
Merci
French
English
Noël
Vin
Sans
Femme
Après
Monde
Maison
Libre
French
English
Mort
Tête
Ville
Guerre
École
Garçon
Fête
Visage
Answer Stats
French
English
% Correct
Your %
(67)
Allow "festival" for fête (as in the village fête)?. I see google-translate translates fête that way also..
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Sep 30, 2014
Festival will work now.
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Oct 1, 2014
(21)
Fête is différent that festival that's not The same thing at all
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Mar 8, 2017
(60)
Also possibly fair??
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Jan 4, 2015
(66)
The more accurate translation for "fair" is "foire", but it's true that "fête du village" is also used, so I second this request.
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Jan 5, 2015
(33)
I thought "fete" meant celebration, but I guess that's English? I took so many languages in school before learning how to learn them, if that makes sense, and they all became jumbled in my brain once I hit middle age and ever since.
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Jan 10, 2015
(36)
Should Female work for "Femme"?
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Oct 7, 2014
(70)
As a noun, yes, but I prefer woman... in French, we only use "femelle" for animals (and some plants)
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Nov 5, 2014
(69)
But the meaning is exactly the same in English, and female is closer to femme in spelling so probably more likely to spring to mind. Makes no sense to not accept it as a correct answer.
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Jan 4, 2015
(41)
Femme and Woman are nouns, Female and Femelle are adjectives. It makes sense not to accept that answer.
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Jan 5, 2015
(44)
@serval Female is both a noun and an adjective in English.
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Jan 5, 2015
(33)
I tried "female" first. But I honestly don't remember specific French translations for many common words.
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Jan 10, 2015
(20)
Female refers to any species, woman only means human.
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Mar 13, 2017
(33)
birthday should be the best answer for "fête" like in happy birthday = bonne fête
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Dec 7, 2014
(65)
"Bonne fête" is only used in Canada. In Europe and Africa you say "bon anniversaire" or even "joyeux anniversaire". In France, "bonne fête" means happy name-day (as in the feast day of the saint you're named for).
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Jan 4, 2015
(70)
"Fête" has a much broader meaning. It can be translated by feast, festival, celebration, party or holiday...
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Jan 4, 2015
(45)
We do "fêtes d'anniversaire" like you might do "birthday parties", so you see the problem.
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Jan 26, 2016
(43)
bonne fete = good party
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Mar 8, 2017
(45)
@jajaco2017 Not really, at least in France. Saying "bonne fête" to someone refers to a specific celebration (either it's your name day, or Mother/Father day or your birthday (Quebec)) ; but it's about the occasion, not the party itself (there is no need for a party actually). "Bonnes fêtes", plural, is used for the celebrations surrounding of the year's end (usually Christmas and New Year's Eve). If you want to wish a "good party" to someone, you'll likely say something like "have fun", "amuse-toi bien". So "fête" itself can mean "party" as it can mean a specific celebration. But alone and with no context, it's "party" that comes to mind straight and first.
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Mar 9, 2017
(43)
Bon anniversaire
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Mar 8, 2017
(50)
Even though "happy birthday" could be translated by "Bonne fête", the best answer is "Joyeux anniversaire" and not "bonne fête". Anniversaire is used when an event commemorates something that happened the same day as the day of the "anniversaire". In this case, it is the birth of someone, "Fête" has a broader meaning. It could be used to name almost any celebration, whether it's a birthday or a random party.
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Dec 11, 2014
(73)
Got em all, toot sweet.
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Jan 4, 2015
(3)
tout de suite? :)
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Jan 4, 2015
(7)
That was a joke.....!
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Jan 6, 2015
(69)
Maybe girl or female...
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Jan 4, 2015
(70)
The french word for "girl" is strictly "fille".
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Jan 4, 2015
(42)
No, Kal, fille is French for girl. Femme is woman and femelle is female. It might make "sense" to accept femme for female and ville for village, but only if you haven't studied French.
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Feb 20, 2015
(69)
Girl, female, and woman can all be used as synonyms in English. If "femme" means woman in French, it means all of those other things in French, as well. Maybe you'd know that if you had studied English?
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Mar 9, 2017
(47)
Ah International Women's Day passed some people by I see......woman and girl are not synonyms.
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Mar 9, 2017
(69)
and village would make a lot of sense for ville...
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Jan 4, 2015
(51)
Seconding this, it took me a couple tries to get town.
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Jan 4, 2015
Village in French is village.
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Jan 4, 2015
(70)
Absolutely, we use village in french for small localities. Ville can be translated by either town or city.
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Jan 4, 2015
(41)
it wouldn't. Ville is city, and village is.... village!
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Jan 5, 2015
(45)
No, for exemple the city of Paris uses and communicates with "ville de Paris". So, you see, not a village...
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Jan 26, 2016
(19)
I am currently taking French and we are learning places right now. My teacher told me ville meant downtown
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Apr 7, 2016
(67)
Downtown is centre ville, a part of the town, not the entire town. In France, ville is town. I'm sure, I'm french ! Maybe your teacher's french is like my english... Or it's perhaps different in Canada, Haïti or anywhere else people speak french (better for your teacher !).
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Apr 25, 2016
(69)
In the language I speak there is no appreciable difference between a town and a village.
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Mar 9, 2017
(28)
If English is your only language that makes sense... but in French 'ville' is city, and 'village' is village. English has alot 'borrowed' from the French language, so if we were being historically accurate you could say that it should be the other way around :)
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Mar 26, 2017
(53)
That was pretty easy. 3:12 left :P
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Jan 4, 2015
(17)
for 'Fin' you should specify it's the word (la fin = the end) and not the adjective (fin - thin), or accept both answers.
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Jan 4, 2015
(70)
He's right, "thin" was my first guess. The adjective and the noun have totally different meanings.
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Jan 6, 2015
(45)
I agree.
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Jan 26, 2016
(58)
Yep, i thought about 'thin' too before 'end'!
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Apr 5, 2016
Thin will work now
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Oct 7, 2016
(66)
Got them all. Wasn't surprised. Am French.
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Jan 5, 2015
(26)
Got them all. Was surprised. Am not French :)
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Jan 5, 2015
(66)
Tried "liberty" for "libre." Didn't think to go "free." Oh well. I did better than I thought never having taken a French class or anything. Surprised how many are close to their English counterpart. And, of course, some we use in English (like sans and visage). :D
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Jan 9, 2015
(33)
I thought "libre" was "book." Must be Spanish... So is "Libreville" the same as "Freetown?" As in Sierra Leone's capital? I thought it was "Booktown" or "Library" LOL. Now I guess I know better.
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Jan 10, 2015
(46)
Yes Freetown- appropriate for freed slaves, no?
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May 5, 2015
(64)
"Book" would be "Livre". Not that far off!
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Dec 16, 2015
(45)
Nice note!
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Mar 8, 2017
(67)
Liberty is liberté, the noun. Libre is adjective.
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Apr 25, 2016
(29)
got them all! not even french lol
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Feb 12, 2015
(35)
100%! My 10 years of French in Toronto were not for nought. Although I can't even make simple conversation.
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Apr 3, 2015
(31)
Seems to me that a variety of answers ought to be good for 'monde': I put monde into the translator at Babylon and got the following in response - world, people, kingdom, realm, earth ....... blanch, bleach; scoop out .....................I had no idea that it meant so many things, but remember from school that tout le monde meant everyone, so tried person, people, body, bodies, persons, folk, etc. for quite a while, but didn't get it.
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Jun 2, 2015
(45)
"World" is the first word that comes in mind I guess, but people works as well. For all the other exemples, I think they must depend of a specific context. You can't properly say that "monde" means "kingdom" or "realm". For exemple here, "monde" can mean "earth" only the same way "world" can as well. You would rather talk about a "world cup" than an "earth cup".
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Jan 26, 2016
(70)
I also tried people. I read a lot of English regency romances, and they always refer to the "Beau monde" when talking about the upper crust or fashionable people.
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Mar 8, 2017
(68)
I'm torn about whether "people" should be accepted. It is true in one sense - "tout le monde" does mean "everybody", "le beau monde" would be the upperclass people, high society, and in Quebec we commonly say "il y a beaucoup de monde ici" or even " il y a du monde ici" ("there's a lot of people here"). However, I'm pretty sure nearly none of the French-speakers who took this quiz and saw the word "monde" on its own thought of entering "people"; our first thought would be "world". Because if that quiz had been reversed and gave the English word "People" and asked to find the French equivalent, the answer wouldn't be "monde" - it would be "gens" or "peuple".
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Mar 8, 2017
(15)
for "très" why you don't accept pretty ? like in it was pretty easy ?
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Dec 2, 2015
(45)
"Plutôt" or "assez" would better fit for pretty.
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Jan 26, 2016
(68)
Like Cedo said. Pretty, as I understand it and as used in your example, means more "fairly" or "rather". Très is "very", so several notches above in intensity, you could say. There is a difference between the two - maybe not a very big difference, but a pretty big one nonetheless ;).
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Mar 8, 2017
(47)
It depends, travelfan. Pretty, rather and quite may vary in intensity depending on the speaker. In the UK it means fairly and in the US it means very. Check out this link: https://www.ragan.com/Main/Articles/Quite_rather_and_pretty_The_differences_between_Br_44738.aspx
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Mar 8, 2017
(45)
Shouldn't really be a correct translation for "tres"
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Dec 8, 2015
(64)
"Really" translates to "Vraiment". So no, not really.
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Dec 16, 2015
(60)
100%, which is surprising as I did very badly at French in school, and that was many many annees ago!
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Feb 18, 2016
(55)
Even though I don't speak French I got 17. Good score I'd say. Helps that other languages have taken over a few words.
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Aug 12, 2016
(40)
Why are you all trying to redefine the language? - Words that are commonly translated to mean one things should remain so, not be changed to accommodate your narrow, self-serving interests. Thus femme = WOMAN and Ville + TOWN, as in l'hotel de ville (town hall). DUH!
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Nov 21, 2016
(38)
100 percent but not fast enough to escape 40 percent bracket in comparison to all the other test talers
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Mar 8, 2017
(45)
I feel like I've got a bit of an unfair advantage here. That being that I'm studying French...
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Mar 8, 2017
(21)
Ville is actually City, Villages is town.
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Mar 8, 2017
(40)
It is NOT!
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Mar 8, 2017
(68)
"Village" means the same in both French and English. However, if you're talking about something bigger than a village, English has two different words - town and city, depending on the size - while in French, we only have "ville" (sometimes we'll qualify it to say "une petite ville" or "une grande ville"). As a French speaker, I remember how confusing I found it, when I was starting to learn English, to decide whether a place should be called a city or a town. To this day I sometimes still don't know where the line is between the two. L.A. or New York City are easy, but all those mid-range cities/towns (in terms of population I mean) like Albany or Trenton or Hartford. Or even Atlantic City which I would I probably called a town but hesitate to because of the word "city" in its name.
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Mar 8, 2017
(51)
So there are 2 "Freetown" capital cities Freetown and Libreville. You learn something new every day (if you're stupid like me and didn't work it out before)
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Mar 8, 2017
(1)
wow this is so so good love it i got 24/24 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1
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Mar 8, 2017
(58)
Easy five points. But one thing doesn't make sense: why are some words in their feminine and some in their masculine? (e.g. Bon/Bonne, and then Année/An)
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Mar 8, 2017
(70)
It's a bit hard to explain but Année and An are coexisting nouns that are not the masculine and feminine form of the same word, they have distinct entries in the dictionary though being basically synonyms. (It's the same as for jour/journée, matin/matinée and soir/soirée).
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Mar 9, 2017
(65)
Got 'em all eventually. Only one I had to come back to was "bienvenue", but then I remembered Joel Grey in "Caberet".
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Mar 9, 2017
(68)
Pulp Fiction helped me remember garçon.
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Mar 9, 2017
(40)
"Garçon means boy" came to my mind also.
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Mar 9, 2017
(46)
Nice quiz, good word selection, had no problems with the answers allowed.
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Mar 9, 2017
(42)
All 24 but that's probably because it's my second language
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Mar 10, 2017
(44)
Easy stuff, when you took it for nine years in school and have Quebecois friends who often forget it's not your first language. :P
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Mar 11, 2017
(28)
Officially bilingual growing up next to Quebec... yeah this was one of the easiest quizzes lol 24/24
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Mar 26, 2017
(60)
18/24. Man, those French have a different word for everything! :-)
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Mar 31, 2017
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