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Two Letter Answers #4

Guess these answers that are only two letters long.
  • Answer must correspond to highlighted box
  • Quiz by Quizmaster - Oct 14, 2016
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

For this quiz, the answer must correspond to the yellow box. You can move the yellow box by clicking the cell you want to move to, or by using the arrow or tab keys.

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Clue
Answer
Turntable user
Chemical symbol for gold
Yes, in Germany
England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland
Gulf of Mexico oil-spillers
South Vietnamese communist guerrillas
There are 2.54 of these in an inch
Simpson or fruit beverage
Surgeon's room at the hospital
Paul Simon says you can call him this
Poet Eliot
Britain's favorite brown sauce
Clue
Answer
Aussie Aussie Aussie, this this this
Author Salinger
City known for blues and barbecue
Daughter of Henry VIII
Das auto
Security wing of the Nazi party
Rapper Cool J
Michigan north of the Mackinac Bridge
Vancouver is its largest city
Six points in American football
Initials that mean "for example"
Another term for a resume
Answer Stats
Clue
Answer
% Correct
Your %
(68)
ER, her Royal Cypher (which stands for Elizabeth Regina)? See Royal Cypher, and Elizabeth I's own Royal Cypher here.
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Dec 2, 2014
ER will work now
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Dec 2, 2014
(61)
Doesn't matter, the daughter of Henry VIII isn't a two letter answer whichever you choose. Nobody says "QE", noboday calls her "ER" and if ER works why doesn't MR?
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Mar 28, 2015
(47)
ER is used reasonably often in cryptic crosswords, for what it's worth.
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Dec 8, 2016
(65)
Victoria is actually the capital of British Columbia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Columbia
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Dec 2, 2014
(73)
Vancouver is not the capital of British Colombia.
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Dec 2, 2014
D'oh! I know that of course. Fixed.
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Dec 2, 2014
(46)
Where is British Colombia?
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Mar 29, 2015
(44)
Canada. It's a province directly north of Washington, Idaho, and Montana.
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May 1, 2017
(66)
Nope, Colombia is in South America, and it's not British.
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Jun 18, 2017
(20)
British Colombia is a province in Canada, Colombia is a country in South america
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Jun 18, 2017
(55)
Ah no. U don't get it.
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Jun 18, 2017
(71)
This thread is hilarious. They are missing U, kiwiquizzer.
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Jun 20, 2017
(71)
Can't believe I typed ya for ja, then gave up when it didn't work. Sigh.
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Mar 28, 2015
(24)
I always sang it Ollie Ollie Ollie, Oi Oi Oi. Oh well.
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Mar 28, 2015
(61)
Also "Oggie Oggie Oggie".
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Mar 28, 2015
(68)
As an Aussie I always cringe when I hear it
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Jun 18, 2017
(57)
ie. for "for example"? I know the meaning is slightly different, but I feel like they're usually used interchangeably.
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Mar 28, 2015
(69)
That's what I typed as well. Couldn't figure out why it wasn't being accepted.
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Mar 28, 2015
(28)
They mean two different things. Ask any English teacher.
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Sep 6, 2015
(69)
I'm an English teacher.
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Jun 18, 2017
(50)
ie = specifying/clarifying what is meant eg = giving one or more examples of what is meant
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Mar 28, 2015
(69)
to specify or clarify what is meant one gives examples..
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Jun 18, 2017
(70)
I went with i.e. as well. When it didn't work I assumed there was an error in the quiz and moved on, never even considering other options. And Quizmaster you KNOW that if kalbahamut and I agree on something it just HAS to be right!!
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Mar 28, 2015
(15)
"i.e." means "in other words". "e.g." is "for example". If they are used interchangeably, it is only because people don't know what they mean.
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Mar 28, 2015
(69)
An example of something could be that something in other words... the difference is trivial at best
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Jun 18, 2017
(46)
I feel like you're wrong.
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Mar 29, 2015
(55)
The two abbreviations, e.g. and i.e. are latin phrases. I.e. stands for "id est" and basically means "that is", while e.g. stands for "exempli gratia" and means "example given".
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Mar 30, 2015
(46)
They are not interchangeable.
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May 14, 2015
(60)
Perhaps ET (Elizabeth Tudor) or EI (Elizabeth I) for QE?
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Mar 28, 2015
(61)
Have you ever referred to her by any of those? Or the given answers? She just doesn't belong in the quiz.
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Mar 28, 2015
(46)
Queen Elizabeth is often known as QE. The ocean liner QEII is named for Queen Elizabeth the Second. ER and ERII are, respectively, their royal cyphers. They are often used to signify the Queen.
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Mar 29, 2015
(73)
The passenger ship Queen Elizabeth II is not named after the current monarch but means that it is the second ship named Queen Elizabeth. The first one sank some years ago. Similarly the Queen Mary II is the second ship named Queen Mary.
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Jun 19, 2017
(71)
If memory serves correctly, the first ship was named for the Queen Mother, not Henry's daughter or the current monarch.
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Jun 20, 2017
(60)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oggy_Oggy_Oggy for the Welsh/Cornish original!!
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Mar 28, 2015
(9)
Agree. Australia didn't start using this until 1980s.
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Mar 29, 2015
(46)
How is 'KC' an abbreviation for Memphis, which is the ONLY acceptable answer for a city known for blues and BBQ.
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Mar 31, 2015
(66)
What about NOLA? Because Jazz and Blues are basically the same thing and Cajun and BBQ are basically the same thing. Right? :P
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Apr 9, 2015
(46)
What does KC stand for?
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May 14, 2015
(69)
I thought Kansas City.
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Jun 18, 2017
(58)
Of course Memphis has both too. You want Memphis to win the blues crown? Fine. Barbecue? Come on now.
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Jun 18, 2017
(71)
Even though I'm a MO resident, I'll take Memphis barbecue any day over KC's (except for Oklahoma Joe's which I hear is now just "Joe's". The rest of the well-known BBQ up there is too gloppy and sweet for me.) Memphis is also "home of the blues" - Beale Street, anyone? Maybe I'm just prejudiced because my husband's brother plays there.
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Jun 20, 2017
(68)
It's spelled "barbecue". At best, some dictionaries include "barbeque" as a variant. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbecue
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Jan 26, 2016
Fixed
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Oct 14, 2016
(53)
i.e could also mean 'for example'. i.e is short for 'Id est' which in Latin means "That is/in other words/that is to say"
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Aug 26, 2016
(45)
"That is" is not the same as "for example" - there is a clear distinction between the two.
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Jun 19, 2017
(1)
i think you should accept GB for england, scotland, wales and northern ireland because they can all be referred to as the United Kindom or Great Britain
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Aug 31, 2016
(57)
Not exactly. Great Britain doesn't contain Northern Ireland. That's why the UKs full name is United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.
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Mar 30, 2017
(58)
In the words of the song, "When will they ever learn, (repeat) ..........."
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Jun 18, 2017
(58)
Viet Cong was the name adopted by Americans for the group that called itself, in its abbreviated English form, the National Liberation Front, or NLF. With that in mind, in Vietnam the thing that Americans call the Vietnam War is called the American War.
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Jun 18, 2017
(46)
My brain annoys me. When the quiz says: turntable user, I think of trains.
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Jun 18, 2017
(51)
"Das Auto" was the slogan for the German brand Opel for decades. Volkswagen stole/hijacked it in 2007. Just for info :)
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Jun 18, 2017
(43)
Turntable user: LP : ]
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Jun 18, 2017
(61)
Agree! I kept typing that in thinking I must be mistyping since it wasn't being accepted!
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Jun 18, 2017
(46)
The abbreviations i.e. and e.g. are not interchangeable, i.e., one should not be considered an equivalent replacement for the other. Since "i.e." stands for "id est" which is "that is" in Latin, one could substitute a similar phrase, e.g., "in other words", but not "e.g."
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Jun 18, 2017
(8)
got all of them first try!
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Jun 18, 2017
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