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U.S. Electoral College Landslides

Name the candidates who won or lost the U.S. Presidential election by the largest margins.
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Electoral Vote
Year
President
Opponent
132-0
1792
none
69-0
1789
none
231-1
1820
effectively none
523-8
1936
525-13
1984
520-17
1972
162-14
1804
212-21
1864
489-49
1980
486-52
1964
472-59
1932
457-73
1956
Answer Stats
Wins
Losses
Candidate
% Correct
Your %
(29)
Crazy that Nixon did so well. I guess that might be part of why Watergate was such a big deal.
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Nov 7, 2016
(71)
A landslide electoral college victory isn't necessarily a landslide victory. A candidate can win 50% of the vote but do so very evenly, while the loser gets 47%-- across the board in every state, too. I doubt that would happen in today's polarized USA, however, the states are far less homogenous than they used to be.
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Jan 8, 2017
(68)
Would you also be able to add the actual percentages the winning and losing candidate got? It would be interesting to compare the actual vote numbers with the electoral vote numbers.
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Jan 8, 2017
(29)
Indeed, but winning 49/50 states is an incredible feat, regardless of the margin.
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Apr 3, 2017
(50)
good point
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May 19, 2017
(44)
Nixon won the popular vote by a huge margin too. And he was a really successful president by most measures (among other things, he founded the EPA). Shame about watergate.
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May 20, 2017
(44)
Richard Nixon's victory in 1972 was massive, and it heralded a new political alignment where Republican candidates won every election from 1972-1988 in gigantic landslides except for Jimmy Carter's close victory over Gerald Ford 1976, which is an outlier because of Watergate. The reason for the GOP's dominance in that period is that the southern bloc that had been dependably Democratic from the days of Andrew Jackson finally abandoned the Democratic Party for good (so far) because LBJ signed the 1964 Civil Rights Act and 1965 Voting Rights Act into law. The 1968 election was close because the formerly Democratic southern states may have left the Dems, but they didn't turn to the Republicans yet, instead running 3rd Party pro-segregation candidate George Wallace. By '72 the 'Solid South,' joined the GOP, where it remains, and it's why 3 elections from '72 and '84 are on this list, and just missing the cut is George H. W. Bush's dismantling of Michael Dukakis in 1988.
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May 19, 2017
(64)
That was fascinating to read. I'm not being snarky, either. I wasn't born when all that happened, and I hadn't really heard how/why things changed so dramatically. Thanks for the mini history lesson! :)
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May 19, 2017
(48)
Very interesting, indeed. Thumbs up!
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May 19, 2017
(55)
Not really. Nixon was at the same time a crook and a charismatic politician. The former led to his downfall but the latter led to his landslide, combined with the Democrats nominating a strong antiwar candidate. Yep, the Vietnam War still had popular support, despite what you who did not live through it may believe. On the charismatic point, an interesting anecdote: My wife went on a White House tour in October 1973. The tour group was outside the Oval Office. To their surprise, Nixon came out to greet them. As a 17 year old, she remembered how charismatic he was. He apologized to the group for not being able to spend time with them. That night they all, and the world, learned the reason he was too busy. He was busy preparing for the "Saturday Night Massacre".
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May 19, 2017
(59)
Thanks Mr. Beat for helping me learn about elections and much more. Didn't know a Youtube channel would help me to complete a quiz
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Jan 6, 2017
(73)
I think adding another minute would help this considerably.
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Jan 6, 2017
(63)
I agree. I thought that it was far too easy at first, but the opponents do take a decent bit of time to think of. Not that I would have gotten them all, but maybe 1 or 2 more.
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Jan 12, 2017
(65)
I agree.
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May 19, 2017
(56)
What about Trump? He absolutely destroyed Hillary this year in an electoral landslide. He had over 300 electoral votes. It was a very one sided election from the beginning
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Jan 17, 2017
(77)
Not sure what you're getting at, with 538 electors, over 300 is enough to win, but it's only 56.5%, hardly a landslide. Of the 58 elections since 1789, Trump comes in at 46--13th from the BOTTOM in percentage margin of victory.
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Jan 27, 2017
(59)
I think OP's comment was sarcasm.
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Apr 18, 2017
(69)
Yes because it's easy to tell what sarcasm looks like when typed.
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May 19, 2017
(69)
I hope you're joking. I know Trump has claimed that he had the biggest election victory in history, but of course everything he says is a lie or the product of ignorance, and his entire existence is one bad, sad, joke.
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May 19, 2017
(69)
oh man I thought this was going to be easy until I realized we had to name their opponents too
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May 19, 2017
(69)
should have gotten more of those than I did, though.
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May 19, 2017
(61)
I feel ya
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May 19, 2017
(45)
Seconded
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May 19, 2017
(59)
"I won by the biggest landslide! And I won the popular vote! And I had more then ten million people at my inauguration! Everyone agrees!" @TheRealDonaldTrump
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May 19, 2017
(44)
Greaf quiz idea!
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May 19, 2017
(50)
ditto: great idea. speaking from uk, amazed at size of victory for RR and Nixon.....but yeah share of the vote would be interesting too. Good job mate.
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May 19, 2017
(68)
These elections aren't listed in order of electoral votes! Bit confused what the order is.
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May 19, 2017
(59)
The order is as presented. There has not been a constant number of electoral votes over the centuries. If you went by vote totals, Washington wouldn't be on the list, even though his election was unanimous.
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May 19, 2017
(66)
It seems pretty clear that it's by whose opponent got the least electoral votes.
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May 19, 2017
(72)
No, it is by ratio, otherwise Jefferson would be one place higher.
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May 19, 2017
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