Take another quiz >

4-Letter Word Chain Game #4

For each hint, enter a 4-letter word. The last letter of this word will be the first letter of the next word.
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
First submittedFebruary 10, 2015
Last updatedJune 13, 2017
Times taken29,299
Rating3.74
5:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 30 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Hint
Answer
Rainbow-colored gem
Opal
Magma when at the surface
Lava
Something a sailor says
Ahoy
Walled city of northern England
York
Capital of Ukraine
Kiev
Artery's counterpart
Vein
Roman fiddler
Nero
Unpleasant smell
Odor
Chess piece
Rook
Ethnicity of northern Iraq
Kurd
Mute
Dumb
Dutch-speaking person of South Africa
Boer
The Eternal City
Rome
Leader of Dubai or Abu Dhabi
Emir
Famous fancy hotel
Ritz
Hint
Answer
Metallic element
Zinc
What koi and goldfish are
Carp
Summit
Peak
Ms. Winslet
Kate
River that passes through Germany
Elbe
Celtic singer
Enya
German car brand
Audi
Sacred bird of ancient Egypt
Ibis
Snail relative
Slug
Oversupply
Glut
Setting of "The lliad"
Troy
Steppe-dweller's house
Yurt
Neighbor of Benin
Togo
Double reed instrument
Oboe
Word frequently shouted into a canyon
Echo
+3
level 72
Feb 10, 2015
Odor is 5 letters, with a u, in much of the world.
+2
level 73
Mar 12, 2015
even in a quiz that isn't about geography, it's good to see the America vs the rest of the world debate continuing.
+4
level 32
Mar 14, 2015
You may have noticed that you have to know a variety of things about a variety of places to score well on these quizzes. Being aware of different spellings isn't much to ask.
+3
level 67
Jun 11, 2017
Not a great defence of the clue. I'll assume no regional bias was intended by the quiz maker, but when you've grown up spelling a word a certain way, it's understandable that it may never occur to you that it might qualify as a shorter word. Now I'll sit back and wait for someone to tell me I spelt "defence" wrong.
+1
level 75
Jun 11, 2017
No, you spelled spelt wrong. (Just kidding, but in the US spelt is a grain, and spelled is the verb.) Just curious, do you also say smelt instead of smelled?
+1
level 66
Jun 11, 2017
ander217 - I think it's to do with tense: "I spell a word correctly", "I spelled a word correctly", "I have spelt a word correctly". It's the same with "spill" (hence the phrase "no use crying over spilt milk"). I'm not sure whether the same applies to "smell".
+1
level 67
Jun 11, 2017
I always write "spelled." I threw in "spelt" as a further provocation, which ander handled with tact! I'm no grammarian, but I don't think spelled and spelt are used for different tenses.
+1
level 43
Jun 12, 2017
Do you say past or passed
+1
level 55
Feb 23, 2018
To be fair, burned and burnt are both correct in different tenses.
+1
level 67
Sep 17, 2018
@Swanbabe - I had that problem once in an English test, where I had to write about a runner passing an opponent. I think I wrote "He's past him", meaning "he has passed him". Of course my version would then have been wrong. Luckily the teacher didn't count it as a mistake, though, as the meaning could also be interpreted as "he is past him" - and in that case it was correct! In short: passed = past participle; past = adjective.
+1
level 76
May 28, 2015
Odoru?
+1
level 68
May 29, 2015
Odour...
+2
level 72
Feb 29, 2016
It's only odoru in a cheaply dubbed Japanese cartoon
+1
level 67
Feb 12, 2017
Yeap, the word is spelt 'odour'. Just because Americans choose to drop the U doesn't mean that's an acceptable spelling, it just means they all spell it wrong. Lol. While it was fairly easy to figure out, a note at the start saying you were using American 'spelling' might have helped.
+1
level 55
Mar 24, 2017
LOL 'wrong'
+2
level 51
Apr 12, 2017
Yes, skibumb, 'wrong', because English was (here's a shocker) invented in England. American English is, by definition, wrong, because the English invented English.
+1
level 38
May 9, 2017
While I'm not convinced that the English invented English [Isn't English a Germanic Language and didn't the German tribes exist first?] I nevertheless agree that both the English and American spellings should be accepted. Especially, since many non-Americans would have learned English with the English spellings thus making it easier to take these quizzes.
+1
level 30
Jun 11, 2017
Jesus Christ! You idiots are arguing about how to spell the word odor when there are so many other problems in the world. As long as it a spelling is accepted in one part of the world, it should be fine for a Jetpunk quiz to use it.
+1
level 57
Feb 20, 2018
Aside from the argument that English spelling throughout history has rarely been consistent, that the standardization occurred separately over the years with the Americas preferring the simplified versions put forth by Noah Webster (Webster's dictionary, anyone?) and the British preferring oddities like adding extra letters (IIRC the Latin origin of "color" has no "u" for instance) meaning neither is inherently right or wrong, and the fact that this is a silly argument to be having in the first place... The US has the greatest number of native-speaking English speakers in the world. 258 MILLION of the world's 330-360 million. You can say all you want about American-centric quizzes, but spelling? Y'all chill.
+1
level 73
Jul 12, 2018
I wouldn't exactly be proud of claiming the English language. It's without a doubt the most messed up language on the planet. It's a hodgepodge of dozens of other languages. I mean, you couldn't even agree on the language of origin of your animals versus the meat that comes from them. Pig - Germanic/ham - French, Cow - Germanic/beef - French, Sheep - Germanic/mutton - French, etc. So no...when we take the English language and change it, it's not wrong...it's an improvement.
+1
level 66
Sep 17, 2018
buck1017, not sure what your point is here. I'm surprised that you didn't notice that there is a consistency in what you've just written: The names for the animals (looked after by low class farmers) are all germanic, whereas the posh names for the meats (eaten by the upper classes) all came from the French. Reason: after William the Conqueror, the upper strata of society spoke French whereas the peasants were Anglo-Saxon. And yes, English is the language of England so odour is right. Webster didn't regulate the spelling of English (maybe he regulated the spelling of American?), Samuel Johnson did. On another note, the Italians spell their capital Roma. therefore that is the correct spelling, not Rome!
+1
level 52
Oct 6, 2018
"wrongly", not wrong, it is an adverb, qualifying the verb spelled
+3
level 65
May 25, 2018
I am English, so spell the word "odour". The American spelling is not wrong, it is simply a different convention. My problem is that, in English English at any rate, an odour is not necessarily unpleasant.
+1
level 56
May 14, 2015
a Boer is not an dutch speaking south african, it is strictly an afrikaans speaking farmer and nothing else!
+1
level 76
May 28, 2015
Where did those farmers live and what language did they speak?
+2
level 74
May 28, 2015
Boer simply means "farmer"in Dutch. Some people in South Africa speak Afrikaans and are known as Afrikaners.
+1
level 52
Jun 1, 2015
I second hwes' comment. The clue is decidedly more relevant to pre-20th century South Africa. Dutch is not an official language in SA. It's spoken by tourists, and perhaps the random few that learnt it either at University or from their folks for whatever reason. Afrikaans is one of the official languages of SA. "Boer" = farmer, quite literally. That said, there are a large number of farmers in SA, and almost always, you'll find that these farmers can speak two or more of the official languages. The term "Boer" was (and still is sometimes, unfortunately) used in a contentious manner by some ignorant folks when referring to specific people. Not cool. Other than that, fun quiz, QM!
+1
level 47
Oct 14, 2015
"Boer" is an Afrikaans-speaking person of South Africa. Though Afrikaans is rooted in Dutch, the two languages are as different as for eg. Spanish and Italian, German and Dutch. Also, though "boer" literally translates to "farmer", it actually carries a strong cultural label. It harkens to apartheid when the "farmer" was the racist antagonist, benefitting from the oppression of the farm workers. Just be aware of that connotation when using the word in quizzes in this manner :) Great quiz otherwise :)
+2
level ∞
Oct 6, 2016
https://www.google.com/search?q=define+boer

Quizzes like this are in crossword-ese. Which means that my goal is not to give a complete and full definition of any term. I'm going to write a few words, not a whole paragraph. Dutch people who settled in South Africa were called Boers. Is that wrong?

+1
level 55
Mar 24, 2017
/thread
+2
level 38
Dec 1, 2017
No, it is NOT wrong! - You are absolutely correct. But we must allow space for belly-achers to kvetch, must we not?
+1
level 55
Jun 11, 2017
I am pretty sure Emir is not spelled with an 'e' but an 'a'. I am Urdu speaking and i know how to speak Arabic and it is pronounced with an 'a' as Amir
+4
level 75
Jun 11, 2017
And here I've been spelling it United Arab Emirates all this time.
+1
level 35
Jun 11, 2017
The "u" in words such as odour, colour, harbour etc are used in English but have their origins in the French spelling, or so my French teacher taught me.
+1
level 44
Feb 6, 2018
Harbour in French is "port", so that does not come from French
+1
level 30
Jun 11, 2017
Rendered rather hard by including the 5 letter word "odour" incorrectly :)
+1
level 76
Jun 11, 2017
I'm sorry, I guess you must be looking for the British JetPunk site. This is the American JetPunk site. Thanks for visiting!
+1
level 69
Jan 5, 2019
Didn't you see the wink, you prat?
+1
level 65
Jun 11, 2017
There are a number of irregular verbs where the past simple and the past participle can be spelled with an 'ed' or a 't': learn, burn, dream, kneel, spill, spell, spoil, lean, sweep etc. Both spellings are acceptable in British English -- not sure if it is different in American English.
+1
level 39
Jun 17, 2017
How is "slug" the second least guessed answer?
+1
level 38
Jun 23, 2017
For Swanbaby: "Past" is commonly used for a time period as in, "I have done so in the past, but I won't in the future." "Passed" in usually used to denote action, as in: On my way to the theatre, I drove passed the deli.
+2
level 67
Jan 19, 2018
That's not quite right. You're right, as the past tense of the verb "pass" it's "passed," but in your example you're using it as a preposition. It's "I passed the theatre" or "I drove past the theatre."
+1
level 38
Oct 24, 2018
You're absolutely right. My faux pas!
+1
level 58
Sep 17, 2018
Mute does not mean Dumb. That would have been acceptable, back in a time where Doctors proscribed Heroin as a cough suppressant, not now. Seriously, this is not okay!
+1
level 72
Jan 21, 2019
Yes, it does
+1
level 57
Aug 14, 2019
Dumb as in not being able to make a sound, not as in the newer, and currently more used meaning; not intelligent.

Lots of words go through shifts in their definition. Sometimes they co-exist, sometimes the old meaning disappears completely. (Examples in the same area are, dull, sharp, bright, dim, etc they all originally meant the literal meaning, but came to be an abstract reference to someone's intelligence).

In dutch the old word for mute was stom which nowadays means stupid, so followed a similar pattern as in english. (But stom/stupid has a narrower meaning in dutch, it is more about dislike "stupid school" "stupid shoes" etc than intelligence. Like in english you can use it for dislike but also say somebody is stupid meaning he is not smart. We use the word dom(dumb) in that case.

And then there is shtumm. Very surprised when I first heard that in english. (Which comes via yiddish from german stumm) And only means mute (and nót also dumb or stupid if I'm not mistaken

+1
level 38
Jul 22, 2019
I thought that an echo was the sound produced when a word (or sentence) is shouted in a canyon, not the word itself.
+1
level 57
Aug 14, 2019
(without having started the quiz) The picture looks like a melted bag of M&M's haha
More Quizzes in this Series