Take another quiz >

MLB Baseball 50 Home Runs in a Season

Try to name the players that have hit 50 home runs in a single season.
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
First submittedOctober 7, 2010
Last updatedSeptember 30, 2019
Times taken32,379
Rating4.08
5:00
Enter player here:
0
 / 30 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Year
HR
Player
2019
53
Pete Alonso
2017
59
Giancarlo Stanton
52
Aaron Judge
2013
53
Chris Davis
2010
54
Jose Bautista
2007
54
Alex Rodriguez
50
Prince Fielder
2006
58
Ryan Howard
54
David Ortiz
2005
51
Andruw Jones
2002
57
Alex Rodriguez
52
Jim Thome
2001
73
Barry Bonds
64
Sammy Sosa
57
Luis Gonzalez
52
Alex Rodriguez
2000
50
Sammy Sosa
Year
HR
Player
1999
65
Mark McGwire
63
Sammy Sosa
1998
70
Mark McGwire
66
Sammy Sosa
56
Ken Griffey, Jr.
50
Greg Vaughn
1997
58
Mark McGwire
56
Ken Griffey, Jr.
1996
52
Mark McGwire
50
Brady Anderson
1995
50
Albert Belle
1990
51
Cecil Fielder
1977
52
George Foster
1965
52
Willie Mays
1961
61
Roger Maris
54
Mickey Mantle
Year
HR
Player
1956
52
Mickey Mantle
1955
51
Willie Mays
1949
54
Ralph Kiner
1947
51
Johnny Mize
51
Ralph Kiner
1938
58
Hank Greenberg
50
Jimmie Foxx
1932
58
Jimmie Foxx
1930
56
Hack Wilson
1928
54
Babe Ruth
1927
60
Babe Ruth
1921
59
Babe Ruth
1920
54
Babe Ruth
+1
level 73
Mar 6, 2014
LOL at only 93% getting Sosa when his name is clearly visible in the picture.
+1
level 34
Jul 5, 2014
Never remember Mize and always forget about Cecil doing it. Father-son combo
+1
level 49
Jul 29, 2017
People forget Mize played for the Giants. They just know the Cardinals and Yankees.
+1
level 23
Dec 18, 2014
in UK, know absolutely nothing about baseball. Got 5, Babe Ruth, Sosa, Rodriguez were easy. Guessed Jones and Gonzalez......
+1
level 37
May 11, 2016
Baseball: the best sport by far, the best game by far, and the Phillies are the best team by far.
+1
level 44
Apr 26, 2017
except they have one good player and just overpayed for a past-his-prime pitcher *cough* Bucholz *Cough Cough*
+3
level 34
Apr 27, 2017
False, false and LOL very false.
+1
level 49
Jul 29, 2017
An attempt at irony?
+1
level 37
Oct 13, 2017
Irony for sure. Clay Bucholtz isn't even good, by the way.
+1
level 49
Sep 2, 2019
Bucholz is on the jays now lol
+1
level 62
Oct 2, 2019
From NZ. Got Babe Ruth and guessed Jones.
+1
level 54
Jun 6, 2016
How many names can you think of for a home run? http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/103225/different-names-for-a-home-run
+1
level 70
May 16, 2017
From 1903 thru 1989 (87 years), someone hit the 50-home run mark 17 times.

From 1995 thru 2002 (8 years), someone hit the 50-home run mark 18 times, including at least 1 player every year.

From 1903 thru 1997 (95 years), someone managed 60 HRs twice (Ruth & Maris)

From 1998 thru 2001 (4 years), someone hit 63 or more HRs 3 times without even leading the league.

Are there still morons out there who think steroids don't help players hit more home runs?

Oh yeah, and guess which year Brady Anderson experimented with steroids?
+1
level 49
Jul 29, 2017
The modern player is more athletic in every way, coaching methods have improved enormously and commitment to the sport have resulted in phenomenal offensive accomplishments. Those who did experiment with PEDs will someday be recognized as pioneering heroes.
+1
level 70
Oct 5, 2017
To quote someone who actually USED steroids, Jose Canseco, "Steroids make a good player great, and a great player super-human." The numbers bear this out 100%. Why do you think players risk multi-million dollar careers to take the juice? Because it helps their complexion?
+1
level 49
May 8, 2018
Your cynicism gets annoying. Canseco "wrote" his book because he was mad at baseball. Some of those he accused were never confirmed. That doesn't mean some weren't users. Ivan Rodriguez, for example, lost a lot of weight during the off season after "Juiced...." came out. However, there's no evidence against Anderson or Luis Gonzalez, for example. And how about the hundreds (or more?) who werent helped? You still had to be good.
+1
level 61
Oct 2, 2019
You still had to be good, but Brady Anderson was a career leadoff hitter who somehow packed an extra 35 home runs into one season. The years preceding his 50-home run season, he hit 13, 12, and 16 home runs, respectively. In the two years subsequent, he hit 18 home runs each year, and played over 100 games in each of those seasons. It's really hard to believe he wasn't taking steroids. How else can you explain such an unprecedented power explosion out of nowhere? And if he wasn't cheating, why didn't he keep up whatever he did during 1996? I just can't fathom any other reasonable explanation in his case. Gonzalez shows basically the same arc, but his annual home run totals were slightly higher. We're not in a court of law where you need proof beyond all reasonable doubt. Reasonable people can assess the information before them and draw reasonable conclusions. Those guys were on steroids.
+1
level 52
Oct 2, 2019
The opposite argument could be made: if Anderson WAS cheating why didn't he keep up his 1996 production? With such success why would he have stopped juicing after one season?
+1
level 28
Sep 16, 2017
Stanton????
+1
level 61
Oct 2, 2019
Pretty incredible that Sammy Sosa broke Roger Maris's mark three different times and didn't even lead the league in any of those years. I get annoyed watching the enhanced balls fly out of the park so often in 2019. The steroid era looks preposterous in retrospect.
+1
level ∞
Oct 2, 2019
The current era is even worse, in my opinion. There are even more home runs than during the steroid era. This year, 58 different players hit at least 30 home runs. With players focusing on "launch angle", the tiny modern ballparks, and the juiced ball, there are so many routine pop flies that are drifting over the fence. And I have a feeling that players are still using steroids (Nelson Cruz's home run numbers seem strangely immune to father time, for example).
+1
level 61
Oct 2, 2019
There's a Twitter account called "Juice Ball Exposed" that posts the most ridiculous home run from each night, along with a bunch of posts and stats dripping with righteous indignation. My friends and I have some good laughs sharing the videos, although the feed itself raises some strong point. If only accounts addressing important political issues were so organized and entertaining.
+1
level 67
Oct 2, 2019
There are other reasons why home runs have been up again recently. I'll point to this recent bit from an article in the Toronto Star: "And sparked by batters going for the fences to beat suffocating shifts, strikeouts set a record for the 12th year in a row and outnumbered hits for the second straight season." So, new defensive alignments have meshed with a massive move away from "small ball": bunts, steals, choking up with two strikes. It's now feast-or-famine batters one through nine, all the time. I think the game suffers for it.