Answers are Numbers Quiz #2

The answers are all numbers. Guess what they are.
Type using numbers, not letters
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 19, 2019
First submittedNovember 13, 2011
Times taken38,078
Rating3.86
5:00
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0
 / 23 guessed
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Clue
#
# of Arabian nights
1,001
Dystopian novel by Orwell
1984
Seconds in an hour
3,600
Who do we appreciate?
2468
Days in a leap year
366
Bones in the human body
206
Pounds in a short ton
2,000
# of Minnesota lakes, supposedly
10,000
Visual representation of three snowmen
888
# of Spartans at Thermopylae
300
"Perfect" vision
20-20
Convenience store chain
7-11
Clue
#
Jenny's phone #
867-5309
World population on March 12, 2012
7,000,000,000
File not found error
404
For God so loved the world that
he gave his only son
3:16
Squares on a chess board
64
6!
720
Reason for invading Iraq?
9/11
987,654,321 - 876,543,210
111,111,111
Ocho times deux times fünf
80
Square root of 9 million
3,000
Usain Bolt's 100 meter record
9.58
+1
Level 45
Jul 21, 2014
Shouldn't it be "Whom do we appreciate?"
+3
Level 57
Jul 21, 2014
No, it should not. "To whom to we give appreciation" would be correct, but not "whom do we appreciate."
+4
Level 77
Jan 27, 2018
No, technically "who" is still in the accusative here. Reverse it and you'll find that it's "we appreciate him/them/her", not "we appreciate he/they/she". So strictly speaking it's "whom".
+1
Level 44
Aug 4, 2014
Those rules were made up. They're completely linguistically unsound.
+7
Level ∞
Aug 28, 2017
At this point, the word "whom" should probably be retired. Unless you're over the age of 60, or a professor, it's almost impossible to use without sounding pretentious.
+2
Level 80
Feb 26, 2018
I've been a professor but people still get confused and think I'm pretentious.
+3
Level 67
May 8, 2018
They weren't made up; they come from a time when English was more inflected than it is now. Most modern English speakers have no feel for case - because it is no longer a living feature of our language. Who/whom is following Ye/You and thou/thee into history. We still have I/Me/My and We/Us/Our, but many native speakers don't use them in a grammatically correct manner either, because English no longer relies on case to convey meaning.
+1
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
Isnt it sort of self implied that rules are made up... ALL rules are made up (and definitely grammatical ones)
+2
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
And it only sounds pretentious because so many people get it wrong, that that has become the majority and instead of admitting their own mistake and risk looking stupid, they try to make the other party look bad (which has a domino effect, because noone wants to be associated with the group that gets ridiculed, so in turn people join the group that ridicules other and join in). That is how it always goes, not just in language.
+1
Level 67
Nov 20, 2020
I'm 18 and always use whom in the objective case.
+1
Level 82
Oct 20, 2014
What is the question about anyway? Makes NO sense to me.
+4
Level 79
Nov 3, 2014
It's a cheerleading cheer, "2, 4, 6, 8, who do we appreciate, 3, 5, 7, 9, we'll kick your behind, 1, 2, 3, 4, we will knock you out the door." The first part was later used in the lyrics of a song.
+2
Level 70
May 1, 2015
Years ago we used to chant (by we I mean a crowd of 30,000)..... 1234 who are we shouting for ........ 5678 who do we appreciate ... Then we would spell out the name of the team we were supporting.
+1
Level 71
Aug 31, 2017
Thanks for explaining, ander217! I didn't know what that one was about either.
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2020
sillie, you're right. The number is not 2468 - these are four different numbers
+1
Level 77
Dec 6, 2015
Yes... but nobody chants it like that.
+2
Level 40
Jul 22, 2014
The reason we invaded Iraq wasn't 9/11, it was resolution 1441. The answer 1441 should be acceptable.
+8
Level 74
Aug 3, 2014
Who on earth is Jenny?
+1
Level 82
Oct 20, 2014
It's some famous song. That's all I know.
+1
Level 55
Feb 26, 2018
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6WTdTwcmxyo
+2
Level 69
Jul 22, 2018
Yeah, I hadn't a f*****g clue on that either. Even after seeing the answer I'm none the wiser.
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2020
I'm with you, Algernon
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2020
You can call her to ask!
+2
Level 50
Jan 16, 2017
It's a common misconception that 20/20 means "perfect" vision, but it doesn't. It means "normal" vision.

If I have 20/20 vision, that broadly means I can see at 20 feet what the average person can see at 20 feet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_acuity

+4
Level 70
Jul 1, 2017
I was in a queue this morning and I could see 32 feet at 20 feet.
+1
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
Hahaha
+3
Level ∞
Aug 28, 2017
Thus the quotes around "perfect". At some point, the average vision probably was around 20/20. I've heard that nearsightedness is correlated with spending time inside as a child. Rural people have much better vision than urbanites.

http://bjo.bmj.com/content/early/2016/01/22/bjophthalmol-2015-307724

+2
Level 79
Feb 26, 2018
I'm a farm girl, and working outside in the sun gave me cataracts at age 50. You win some, you lose some.
+1
Level 80
Feb 26, 2018
Last time I was tested (years ago, my body has broken down a lot since then) I had 20/10 or 20/15 vision, better than "perfect."
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2020
Yes. Perfect vision is recorded as 6/6. You can see at 6 metres, what you should be able to see at 6 metres. Where did 20-20 come from?
+1
Level 79
May 2, 2017
Instead of calling Jennie I'd rather call Eddie Floyd or Wilson Pickett at 634-5789.
+1
Level 72
Aug 31, 2017
Your age is showing ;-D
+1
Level 57
Aug 29, 2017
759 is also a chain of convenience store. Please accept it.
+1
Level 60
Feb 26, 2018
711 is a much larger chain. maybe instead of also accepting 759, the hint could be modified to only be relevant to 711.
+1
Level 78
Aug 30, 2017
I hate to feel stupid, but can someone please explain the 6! = 720 to me (or at least guide me to where an appropriate explanation can be found)?
+4
Level 73
Aug 30, 2017
I don't know the english word, but in french it is "factoriel 6", used in statistics : 6x5x4x3x2x1=720

Example : you have 3 cards, A B and C. There is several ways to order them.

ABC - ACB - BCA - BAC - CAB - CBA

Six are possibles, because the answer is "3!", factoriel 3, 3x2x1=6. And you have 1 chance in 6 to guess the position of cards.

You can use factoriels to know how many chance you have to win in games like lottery, loto... (not a lot !).

+4
Level 72
Aug 31, 2017
In English it's the exact same word, except, ya know, in English: "factorial". However, the order in which you say it is reversed: you would not say "factorial 6" for 6!, but rather "6 factorial".
+3
Level 77
Nov 29, 2017
This is just one possible use of course, the factorial is in general a mathematical sign that means multiplying the number with all smaller natural numbers:

1!=1

2!=2×1=2

3!=3×2×1=6

4!=4×3×2×1=24 etc

+1
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
Well explained Dechnord! :) We call it faculteit, which literally translated would be faculty... so I have a hard time remembering the correct english term. Only that it is close, but slightly off.
+5
Level 72
Feb 26, 2018
I suggest changing the "square root of 9 million" to some other number otherwise when you type 3,000 you also get the 300 answer
+1
Level 33
Feb 26, 2018
had the same happen to me
+1
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
not to me, because the 300 question comes first.
+1
Level 55
Apr 12, 2020
True, not everyone goes through these in order.
+6
Level 44
Feb 26, 2018
Shouldn't the word "Reason" in the Iraq question be changed to "Excuse"??
+1
Level 55
Feb 26, 2018
Clever concept!

Glad I'm not alone not knowing what Bolt's record was

+1
Level 70
Feb 26, 2018
When Minnesota put the claim on their licence plates, Manitoba initially responded by putting "100,000 lakes" on theirs. Depending on definitions, there are probably only half that in Manitoba.
+1
Level 73
Feb 26, 2018
888? Is that three snowmen without heads?
+1
Level 67
Oct 10, 2019
quit with about 2 minutes left, there was no way I was gonna get the bottom 4 (least guessed). The rest was not too hard,only 2 that took some actual math (well three I guess if you count 3600, but I knew that one without having to calculate it again).
+1
Level 55
Apr 12, 2020
987654321 - 876543210 is pretty easy to calculate if you think about it for a moment!
+1
Level 28
Oct 13, 2019
I spent so long trying to figure out how many variations of 0 there were for "reason for invading iraq"
+1
Level 71
Apr 20, 2020
Why do you keep using the "sharp" symbol to mean "number"?
+1
Level 78
Apr 20, 2020
That's just what it means. # is a number sign (or hash, or pound sign). The sharp symbol is ♯. "Not to be confused" apparently, though I always use # for sharp. It's just easier as it's there on the keyboard.