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Double B Vocabulary Words

All the words contain the letters BB. Based on the definitions, guess what they are.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedFebruary 8, 2011
Last updatedSeptember 16, 2015
Times taken25,192
Rating4.12
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Definition
Word
Whale fat
Blubber
Jewish religious leader
Rabbi
Turkey's noise
Gobble
The sheath of a sword
Scabbard
British for garbage
Rubbish
To restrict a horse's movement
Hobble
The day of rest
Sabbath
Small bite
Nibble
Person who repairs shoes
Cobbler
Short, rough facial hair
Stubble
Extended leave period for
university professors
Sabbatical
Definition
Word
Israeli commune
Kibbutz
The receding movement of the tide
Ebb
Monastery
Abbey
To turn and stare, especially at a car accident
Rubberneck
It's what brooks do
Babble
British police officer
Bobby
To write or draw quickly and carelessly
Scribble
Period of exuberant asset prices
Bubble
To raise a trivial objection
Quibble
Type of small, long-armed ape
Gibbon
To attempt to influence the government
on behalf of a special interest
Lobby
+1
level ∞
Jun 6, 2013
Updated and expanded!
+1
level 66
Jul 21, 2013
A gibbon is a monkey, not an ape. Apes are gorillas, chimps, humans and orangutans (and possibly sasquatch ;))
+3
level 59
Jul 21, 2013
Gibbons are lesser apes, but they are indeed apes.
+1
level 72
Jul 26, 2014
Is this a quibble?
+2
level 70
Oct 30, 2015
Gibbons don't have tails. Therefore, they are apes.
+1
level 70
Jul 22, 2013
To raise a Trivial object: Squabble should work as well. But not to quibble about it though.
+1
level 38
Aug 26, 2013
Cute
+1
level 55
May 3, 2015
I tried squabble, too. Not absolutely sure that it fits, though.
+1
level 81
May 29, 2014
Tried to figure out the brook one. Managed to get: turkey noise, restricting horse's movement, raising a trivial objection. Never got the brook one, I had no clue the word ment that as well.
+1
level 55
May 3, 2015
People often talk about a babbling brook, referring to the sound it makes.
+1
level 67
Jan 21, 2016
In a shady nook, by a babbling brook, that's where I fell in love with you ........ song
+1
level 50
Nov 1, 2015
Could Nobble be accepted instead of Hobble, i've heard of this term for disabling racehorses.
+1
level 68
Jan 18, 2016
Thought "British for garbage" was "British for garage"... oh, well...
+1
level 79
Jan 18, 2016
I'm pretty sure the British word for "garage" is just "garage."
+1
level 71
Apr 3, 2018
It is, but most of us mispronounce it, otherwise it would be too simple for everyone else.
+1
level 65
Apr 16, 2018
Me too! Took me a second...haha.
+1
level 75
Jan 18, 2016
All I could think of was cranenecking instead of rubbernecking. Darn, only one I missed.
+1
level 57
Jan 19, 2016
To write carelessly and quickly is to scribble, but to to draw carelessly and quickly is to doodle.
+1
level 47
Jan 20, 2016
And basketball players dribble.
+1
level 80
May 24, 2016
Squabble for Quibble?
+1
level 60
May 19, 2019
agree I thought squabble aswell
+1
level 70
Sep 14, 2017
3 questions in, and 2 of the answers are repeats from the "Double B Answers" quiz from 2 years prior. Pretty lame.
+1
level 60
May 19, 2019
I didnt get the hobble one, dint know that. Funn, in dutch you have hobbelpaard, which means/is the word we use for rocking horse. But allways thought it was because hobbel(en) means well what you get when going over a bumpy road, little movements. (and pretty sure that is it what it stands for) never knew that in english hobble means to restrict a horses movement. Now I got to look up if there are connected. Many english words come from dutch. (or to say it differently old english has more in common with modern dutch than with modern english)
+1
level 60
May 19, 2019
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=hobble It actually directly names dutch, usually it goes a steps further to the source, and say Protogermanic, which in most cases supplied cognates in other germanic languages. (german, norse etc)

other words often come from french, well through french from latin