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British Acronyms

Here are a list of acronyms related to the British Isles. Can you guess which each letter stands for?
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

UK
RAF
GB
EPL
PM
NHS
VC
SNP
BBC
MP
(of)
TA
HMS
IRA
OBE
(of the)
OED
SAS
BP
VAT
HoC
(of)
LSE
(of)
Answer Stats
Acronym
Word
% Correct
Your %
(32)
The IRA isn't British. The clue is in the name.
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Sep 21, 2013
(70)
The IRA operates in Northern Ireland, which is part of the UK but not part of Great Britain. "British" can refer to something relating to Great Britain but it can and often is used to mean something relating to the United Kingdom. Therefore, the IRA is appropriate to include in a quiz about British things.
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Oct 31, 2013
(70)
In the same way that the SNP don't want to be in the least associated with Britain but still appear here, presumably.
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Apr 9, 2017
(55)
The IRA clearly does not see themselves as British, hence they shouldn't be included in the quiz. With that logic, any organisation that's ever operated on British soil could be part of the quiz
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Aug 7, 2017
(51)
Absolutely Borgir. Spot on. Nailed it bang to rights.
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Aug 7, 2017
(57)
The quiz's description says 'related to the British Isles'. Not 'things that are British'. As the IRA operates within the British Isles, geographically speaking before one looks at Eire and Ulster differences, they are welcome in this quiz.
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Aug 7, 2017
(70)
"any organisation that's ever operated on British soil could be part of the quiz"

right.
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Aug 7, 2017
(31)
he knew that Northern Ireland was in the UK he did not know the ira was in Northern Ireland. I hate it when people explain it to you like they are more knowledgeable he was making a guess for god sake
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Aug 7, 2017
(43)
slightly amusing though
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Oct 31, 2013
(25)
It does state "British Isles", which is a geographical entity and contains both the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland (as well as the Isle of Man).
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Aug 9, 2017
(68)
The IRA was formed in the early 1900s, opposed to British rule of the United Kingdom (of GB & Ireland). Therefore it originated in the UK as it was then - where's the problem?
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Aug 15, 2017
(70)
What about Mi-6
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Oct 31, 2013
(58)
Too British.
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Oct 31, 2013
(50)
lol
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Oct 31, 2013
(68)
only 38 percent got epl?
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Oct 31, 2013
(50)
I have never heard anyone from the UK call the premier league the EPL. Got it, but only as a result of living in another country.
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Oct 31, 2013
(46)
Tons of people call it EPL or BPL and I live in London
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Nov 1, 2013
(10)
Me neither, and I'm British as well. "The Prem" is a far more commonly-used abbreviation in my experience.
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Jun 17, 2014
(60)
Hey zoidberg!! Why would you call it the BPL when it doesn't include the Scottish Premier League??
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Jul 6, 2014
(59)
Erikthev - BPL means BARCLAYS Premier League after its sponsor, Barclays Bank.
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Nov 15, 2014
(46)
Never heard it called that, it's usually referred to as the Premiership.
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May 11, 2015
(60)
Yeah, EPL is used by no one IN the UK, only those outside it. Not sure it should really be on here, though I guess you can make a case for it.
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Apr 9, 2017
(38)
I've always called it the premier league, nothing else
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Aug 7, 2017
(56)
Never heard HoC used - usually just called 'Commons' - but could just be me.
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Nov 1, 2013
(57)
It's just you.
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Nov 5, 2013
(80)
No it's not. I've never heard HoC used by anyone. It's easy enough to guess, but not in general use.
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Mar 26, 2016
(57)
Agreed, live in London my entire life and never heard anyone use an acronym for the House of Commons.
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Aug 7, 2017
(25)
It's quite common, but would normally be used in text rather than in speech - HoL and HP for House of Lords and Houses of Parliament quite common too.
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Aug 9, 2017
(59)
Dont think the IRA will be too happy about being included in British quiz lol
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Nov 1, 2013
(35)
As a Brit, I knew what a lot of them referred to, but had to think about what they stood for. Mostly I guessed. Most of them I never hear used. "OED" I normally hear just called "the dictionary". "TA" I tend to hear the full form. "HoC" I have always heard in full form. You get the picture.
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Nov 1, 2013
(70)
I hear OED used all the time but maybe because I'm an English major. Or are you saying that there are no other dictionaries in use in the UK?
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Nov 2, 2013
(60)
Yeah, that was the one I had never heard before. I hadn't a clue on it. I got the rest straight away. It's either called by it's full, unabbreviated, name in my experience or it's just called 'the dictionary' and used in a more generic sense. I think it may be one, like EPL, used by people outside the UK and virtually no one in the UK.
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Apr 9, 2017
(61)
No, "OED" is very common amongst people who talk about words all the time, particularly crossword solvers.
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Aug 7, 2017
(16)
Strictly speaking OBE stands for Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
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Nov 1, 2013
(69)
Or 'Ole Big 'Ed' :)
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Dec 29, 2015
(59)
Ex-colleague of mine who was awarded OBE refers to it as "Other Buggers' Efforts".
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Aug 7, 2017
(2)
Nice quiz, but these are abbreviations, not acronyms. An acronym is an abbreviation that can be pronounced as a word, e.g., NATO, NASA. However, when you must spell out the abbreviation, e.g., 'U, K', 'B, P', and other examples here (with the occasional colloquial exception of 'VAT') then these are abbreviations. That was incredibly busybody, and I apologise.
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Nov 3, 2013
(50)
This is debated on every abbreviation/acronym quiz. Sure an acronym is technically an abbreviation that can be pronounced as a word, but the term is used loosely all the time. Just like when someone misuses the word "literally." It bothers me too, but you learn to live with it.
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Nov 4, 2013
(67)
RAF can also be considered an acronym
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Jun 8, 2017
(21)
Well, according to the OED, an acronym is "an abbreviation formed from the initial letters of other words and pronounced as a word (e.g., ASCII, NASA)." Even if you don't choose to believe this, in all of Wikipedia's examples, it says "pronounced as a word."
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Nov 5, 2013
In all of Wikipedia's examples, it says "pronounced as a word."
This is not true. Did you even read the Wikipedia article?
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Nov 6, 2013
(70)
Does someone point that out on every single one of these quizzes?
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Apr 9, 2017
(71)
Eventually QMs head is going to explode, he's going to pull the plug, and all you pedantic doofi are going to have to run to Reddit instead.
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Apr 9, 2017
(60)
PM - Post Meridiem, as opposed to AM - Ante Meridiem
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Jul 6, 2014
(60)
HMS - Her Majesty's Service....
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Jul 6, 2014
(73)
Are you thinking of the Bond movie?
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Nov 3, 2014
(70)
Then it would be OHMSS.
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Aug 7, 2017
(57)
15/21 - not bad for an American I suppose.
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Jul 8, 2014
(72)
I got the same. Seeing the ones I missed, felt like I should have got a couple more.
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Jul 15, 2014
(71)
The quiz must have changed since you took it. I scored 38/52, but I hope that's still not bad for an American.
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Aug 7, 2017
(51)
the IRA in a British quiz is just ridiculous..what the hell do you think they fought for? Freedom from British occupation
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Nov 25, 2014
(46)
Gosh you have a keen and unbiased view of British history.
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May 11, 2015
(60)
Lucy is right, that IS what they fought for. And it is right to include them here, because it is part of modern British history, and the impact they had was on British people.
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Jun 8, 2016
(70)
did they achieve that?
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Aug 7, 2017
(70)
Would you object to questions about Robert E Lee appearing on an American history quiz? Honestly the objections raised here are nonsensical.
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Aug 7, 2017
(62)
"VC" also stands for "Village Church" and is often used in the names of primary schools :)
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Jun 7, 2015
(45)
Dont think it is - they may have "C of E" school, but that is not really the same
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Aug 7, 2017
(56)
In any case, it stands for "Voluntarily Controlled", not "Village Church", referring to the legal status of the school.
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Aug 10, 2017
(55)
Would it be too generous to accept British Broadcasting Company?
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Feb 5, 2016
(48)
Erm, yes! The C in BBC does not stand for Company, so why on earth should it be accepted? There used to be a British Broadcasting Company in the 1920s, but that was distinct from the BBC we now have.
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Aug 7, 2017
(68)
As opposed to EBC, which did stand for Emu's Broadcasting Company
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Aug 15, 2017
(68)
OBE stands for 'Officer of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire' in the same way that CBE stands for 'Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire'. The O in OBE stands for 'Officer' not 'Order'.
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May 11, 2016
(66)
Indeed. In vast majority of cases OBE stands for Officer, though you could abbreviate also the order I guess, though I've never seen it.
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Apr 9, 2017
(64)
Thank you! I thought I was going crazy.
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May 4, 2017
(57)
Definitely stands for 'Officer' otherwise you wouldn't be able to distinguish CBE, MBE etc.
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Aug 7, 2017
(60)
At last! A Local quiz for Local people (sorry, Brit comedy reference.) Had to scratch my head a little over EPL. I suppose we just think of it as THE Premier League! So arrogant....
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Jun 8, 2016
(45)
Considering this is a "British Acronyms" quiz, it most certainly should not be the EPL. Maybe the title should be changed to "British Acronyms for non-Brits" - then EPL would be acceptable. We "think" of it as the Premier League, because that's its name.
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Sep 25, 2016
(66)
It's really funny that everywhere else on JetPunk the shorter forms are the norm for the most famous examples and no clarification is needed (World Series, World Cup, Renaissance etc, also FA), except here.

We could make a quiz about American abbreviations and also invent a few acronyms like AMLB, NANHL etc
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Apr 9, 2017
(72)
"There's nothing for you here!"
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Apr 10, 2017
(42)
EPL is incorrect anyway as it include Wales.
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Aug 7, 2017
(56)
No it doesn't. There's a few Welsh teams who for historical reasons play in the English pyramid, but strictly there's a separate Welsh league which operates outside of the remit of the Football League.
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Aug 10, 2017
(60)
Of course...Territorial Army! And their most famous alumnus, Gareth Keenan.
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Feb 20, 2017
(70)
Lol, I saw "TA" and just thought "dialectical way of saying thank you".
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Apr 9, 2017
(66)
Tartan Army? :)
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Apr 9, 2017
(68)
At last, a quiz that doesn't accept "UK".
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Apr 9, 2017
(66)
Apparently TA has been gone for almost 6 years.
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Apr 9, 2017
(55)
Of course I have heard of the English Premier League. Just never figured out EPL!
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Jun 10, 2017
(48)
fun
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Aug 7, 2017
(59)
I understand that the UK has a prime minister and has a value-added tax but why include them in "British Acronyms"? Most other countries have a PM as well and even more have a VAT.
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Aug 7, 2017
(59)
VAT is another true acronym.
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Aug 7, 2017
(73)
I thought EPL was a typo for Emerson Lake and Palmer.
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Aug 7, 2017
(63)
Why on earth don't you read the title explanation before you start pontificating to show just what a clever clogs you are or, in this case, aren't? The title says "British Isles". The British Isles, as distinct from the United Kingdom, includes South Ireland/Ireland/Eire, whichever way you like to refer to the Republic of Ireland, and so any acronym that might be used in Dublin's fair city could be included since Dublin, and Ireland, are in the British Isles. That's a fact of Geography and has no political basis.
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Aug 7, 2017
(49)
Boom 100% Fairly straightforward for anyone British.
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Aug 7, 2017
(66)
LSE also is the London Stock Exchange. I used to work for the LSE, which happens to be located about a 20 minute walk from the university.
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Aug 7, 2017
(67)
These are not acronyms, they are abbreviations. An acronym is an abbreviation that becomes a word, e.g. scuba.
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Aug 7, 2017
(63)
100% on the money. In fact to me an IRA is an Individual Retirement Account. The Irish Republican Army is the I.R.A. However many abbreviations have become accepted as acronyms even though, grammatically, they are not.
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Aug 7, 2017
Some people make a distinction between acronyms and initialisms. Others do not.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acronym

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Aug 7, 2017
(68)
To me it's George Gershwin's brother
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Aug 15, 2017
(65)
This quiz is too America-centric.
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Aug 7, 2017
(70)
This planet is too Jupiter-centric.
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Aug 7, 2017
(45)
As an LSE student I'd say LSE is probably more widely known as London Stock Exchange.
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Aug 8, 2017
(25)
But to be fair to Quizmaster it does clearly distinguish between the two, as it calls for an answer that contains "of".
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Aug 9, 2017
(68)
As a member of neither, School of Economics every time
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Aug 15, 2017
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