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British Spellings Quiz

Based on the American spelling, guess the British spellings of these words.
Some of these are pronounced differently
Last updated: October 07, 2014
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US Spelling
British Spelling
Analyze
Analyse
Airplane
Aeroplane
Aluminum
Aluminium
Mustache
Moustache
Tidbit
Titbit
Traveler
Traveller
Aging
Ageing
Likable
Likeable
Defense
Defence
Check
Cheque
US Spelling
British Spelling
Chili
Chilli
Gray
Grey
Mold
Mould
Plow
Plough
Story
Storey
Tire
Tyre
Curb
Kerb
Color
Colour
Racket
Racquet
Estrogen
Oestrogen
US Spelling
British Spelling
Eon
Aeon
Pediatric
Paediatric
Pajamas
Pyjamas
Realize
Realise
Maneuver
Manoeuvre
Center
Centre
Meter
Metre
Kilogram
Kilogramme
Catalog
Catalogue
Behoove
Behove
+1
level 72
Apr 10, 2012
titbit really sums up the difference between here and there right?
+1
level 44
May 7, 2012
Just what are you implying?
+1
level 33
Apr 10, 2012
Thank you Sherlock Holmes!
+1
level 50
Nov 14, 2014
Indeed!
+1
level 78
Apr 10, 2012
@ Annie1892, it would behoove you to increase your vocabulary! ;)
+1
level 78
Apr 10, 2012
Behoove, by the way, means to suit or to fit; to be in ones best interest.
+1
level 14
Apr 10, 2012
I'm American, and I use a lot of the British spellings. I must admit, though, if not for my keeping up with British pop music I may not have known a few of these.
+1
level 44
Apr 10, 2012
I like the American versions better, mostly. Eliminates unnecessary vowels. I prefer "centre" to "center" though.
+2
level 76
Jan 21, 2013
The American versions are better, but Mr. Webster really didn't go far enough. He fixed some words while leaving others with their errors. While we're on the subject, we could eliminate some letters from the language completely and never miss them. There's no reason for a letter "c" when we've got "k" and "s" and "tsh," and no reason for "x" when we've got "ks." Further, just to help illustrate how screwed up English spelling still is (even in the improved American version of the language), I remember my phonetics professor writing the word "ghoti" on the board and telling us it was "fish." He explained that it was the "gh" from "enough," the "o" from "women," and the "ti" from "nation."
+1
level 44
Apr 17, 2013
i agree with the unnecessary letters, and you can add 'q' to that list. Though I think the language would benefit by creating new letters to make the 'sh' and 'ch' sounds, like russian has.
+2
level 71
Oct 25, 2013
American versions are better? Really? Kalbahamut, I give you: 'sox'. Quod erat demonstrandum et ego requiem meam.
+2
level 73
Dec 3, 2013
It's more like an irrational hatred of anyone who doesn't believe exactly what he believes. Just do enough of these quizzes and read enough comments...you'll see. I've never seen so many comments start with "You are wrong..." in my life.
+4
level 71
May 8, 2014
"American versions are better"... yet Americans persist with using extra syllables when they're not required. Examples: Transportation (transport), anesthesiologist (anaesthetist), councilman/woman (councillor), tunafish (tuna), horseback (horse). And don't get me started on some of the other illogical American phrases such as "I could care less", "let's don't", "a long ways"
+1
level 42
Nov 14, 2014
Actually grantdon, we do use "tuna" and "councillor", but I'm not sure how often you work horseback riding into your everyday conversation. Most people will say "I ride horses" or "I'm an equestrian". In terms of "transportation", have you ever heard and American say "transport"? It doesn't sound right. It sound harsh. Our accent and cadence demands the extra syllables. Language isn't as simple as extra syllables and vowels. I wouldn't say that the British have anything wrong--it works for their cadence, inflections, and rhythm, just as saying "anesthesiologist" works better for the American accent.
+1
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
Gaston: you are wrong. I'm very rational.
buck: what ever are you talking about?
grantdon: as soon as you stop adding extraneous syllables to words like "aluminum" then we'll talk. I'm happy to split the difference. and "I could care less" isn't an American phrase it's just an incorrect one.
+2
level 36
Nov 15, 2014
Bit biased, don't you think? Do you even know much about the British spelling? From what you've written, I assume you don't, Kalbahamut
+1
level 76
Mar 30, 2017
giraffe, viking, this is my play at humor (or humour). I am adopting the same pretentious and condescending certainty and matter-of-fact way of speaking that Brits have when they assert that their dialect is superior. My true feelings on the matter are closer to what giraffe said above. Though I do honestly feel the British spellings are ridiculous and that English spelling could stand to be cleaned up more.
+1
level 34
Apr 11, 2012
I'm American and I've always spelled [or spelt? :)] it "moustache", "traveller", and "likeable". *shrugs*
+7
level 18
Apr 14, 2012
I hate American spellings. Especially when you start to see children using them because of all the American programmes and films!
+1
level 76
Jan 21, 2013
Language is dynamic. Might as well accept it now or your life will be full of frustration. I can guarantee that the changes aren't going to go the other direction.
+1
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
There must be a different definition for logic in British English that you are using.
+1
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
Though learning Chinese is probably not a bad idea.
+1
level 76
Mar 30, 2017
Unless someone burns all copies of the OED we're not really losing anything and trying to squeeze the entire etymology of a word into its spelling seems unnecessarily burdensome to me. Also, in English, there are just as many cases where some odd spelling was arrived at arbitrarily as there are cases where it is the result of loan words from Greek or Latin or French or something else.
+1
level 19
Apr 14, 2012
I was stuck on story... (I'm from the UK) ... then realised that you meant level not narrative haha...
+1
level 65
May 21, 2012
Surprised that I got 20/30. The only one that I ever used was "grey", I never call it "gray".
+1
level 20
Jun 16, 2012
This was always going to generate a lot of interest, maybe someone should do a quiz that points out the similarities. Also I'm an aussie and i have no idea how to spell the British, English or US way...tbh it's prob cause i just cant spell good =9 (or french which some of these seem to be)
+1
level 10
Jun 24, 2012
i never knew that americans have such a variation on our language, some of the american spellings i had never seen before :P
+1
level 22
Jul 4, 2012
aeon means a long time. behove is better explained in context. So, "it ill behoves you to criticise me when you spent an aeon in the toilet doing your make-up" could be translated as : "You've got a nerve to bitch at me when you spent flamin' ages in the bog putting on your slap" I hope that helps
+1
level 38
Oct 11, 2018
To AleckrulesOK: Hilarious! (LMAO)
+1
level 18
Jul 9, 2012
I use the british spellings for like, 15 of the words lol. I always thought that's how they were spelled in the US. :)
+1
level 33
Feb 21, 2013
Racquet? Never seen it written like that - not even by my English teacher.
+1
level 60
Nov 14, 2014
Must be a generational thing in U.K. I was born there, and lived there till 1980, when emigrated to U.S. It was ALWAYS "racquet" in U.K. in those days - I played a lot of tennis. And was taken aback to see "racket" in U.S. on arrival!
+2
level 38
Oct 11, 2018
To me, Racquet is the instrument; racket is pandemonium.
+1
level 57
Dec 21, 2014
I grew up in the U.S. and always spelled it racquet. I associate "racquet" with tennis and "racket" with other meaning (noise, a scam, etc.). Those aren't official definitions, just how I separate them in my own head for some reason.
+1
level 17
Mar 20, 2013
We don't spell racket 'racquet'? never even seen that spelling before
+1
level 60
Nov 14, 2014
Are you British? If so, see my comment just above yours.
+1
level 23
Apr 10, 2013
You need to make the words easier to understand, because we say story, as in a tale, story book, and also, with check, i had no idea it was Cheque. other than a few minor errors, very good quiz. :)
+1
level 53
Jan 9, 2019
Same for 'meter' and 'metre', which are two different things, and therefore both valid.
+1
level 44
Apr 30, 2013
Glad I'm not the only American that spells like a Brit. :)
+1
level 15
May 6, 2013
I don't know if its just me, but I'm British and I don't spell 'story' as 'storey' I get annoyed if anyone spells it like that :/
+1
level 20
Nov 28, 2014
same
+1
level 26
May 19, 2013
I'm British and I've always used curb (probably because I watch curb your enthusiasm)
+1
level 45
Jun 4, 2015
Kerb is right for the edge of a pavement.
+1
level 28
Jun 3, 2013
I use a mix of both and live in the UK
+1
level 21
Sep 4, 2013
Sincee when have we said storey...
+3
level 64
Nov 28, 2014
Ever since we've been constructing multi-storey buildings!
+3
level 29
Sep 23, 2013
After reading many of these stupid comments, I'd just like to point out to everyone who thinks American English is "better" that STANDARD English is British English, which (along with the British Empire) is why most of the world speak it Afterall, the language is called "English" not "American"
+2
level 42
Nov 14, 2014
Linguistically speaking, American English has changed less since the 18th century than British English has. But yes, continue to think that your single particular dialect is the "correct" way to speak the language. I'm sure the other 2/3 of English speakers who speak American English will agree with you...
+3
level 76
Aug 27, 2015
I have read that both have changed by about the same amount, and each has kept things that the other hasn't, so really, any argument for or against one or the other is pointless.
+2
level 24
Nov 7, 2015
That's a common misconception. A related misbelief is that the British in the 16th century spoke similarly to modern Americans. Both are simple falsehoods. Besides, what's your yardstick for 'changed more or less'? Especially when in a historical literacy was a rarity and a single word could have a plethora of 'correct' spellings.
+2
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
So you're proposing we change the name of the language to American? Probably not a bad idea.
+3
level 18
Oct 30, 2013
...aand Australia is a combination of the two
+1
level 38
May 19, 2015
+1 True-blue aussie tween reading dumb arguments between brits and americans stop fighting, guys and gals! G'Day, mate!
+2
level 34
Mar 28, 2018
Same for Canada
+5
level 40
Mar 24, 2014
should be called 'correct spellings quiz'
+3
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
I'm not sure if I want to take spelling advice from someone who doesn't know what capitalization or punctuation are.
+3
level 72
Nov 14, 2014
it is the internet...capitalisation and punctuation do not matter
+3
level 57
Jun 6, 2018
*capitalisation
+1
level 68
Jun 18, 2018
Correct if you decided in the 1800s to make English and Latin based words more French looking than they were originally. Not sure why the "correct" way was to become more like the French after the fact.
+1
level 44
Apr 13, 2014
I have been spelling it manoeuvre for the better part of a few years, and I still forgot how to spell it when it came time for this quiz.
+1
level 61
Apr 23, 2014
I'm British but I've never seen or used kilogramme instead of kilogram or storey instead of story. In fact my computer underlines them for incorrect spellings when I do!
+3
level 55
May 10, 2016
the quiz maker doesn't understand that some of the words chosen are actually just 2 different words with different meanings instead of the "British" spelling, for instance story and storey, one is to be read, the other is a measure of tall buildings.
+1
level 67
Jan 27, 2019
I think the quiz maker understands that just fine. When referring to levels of a building, for instance, we in the US do indeed spell it "story," while Brits do spell it "storey."
+1
level 45
Jun 1, 2018
That's because computers typically recognise only the American spellings
+1
level 45
May 3, 2014
You Yanks ruined the English language!! If ever we used any of your spellings in our schoolwork, we got told off as it is not Standard English! The English language is a beautiful thing that does not need to be 'dumbed down' or simplified. The spellings of the words above really offend my eyes.
+3
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
The English language is a mongrel language with holdovers from different Angle dialects, French, German, Saxon, Dutch, Danish, Latin, Greek etc. It's a mess.
+2
level 35
Apr 26, 2018
Haha but isn't every language? And Angle dialects? There was only one tribe of Angles, and they weren't that big. Perhaps you mean Angle/Saxon/Jutic dialects? Sorry to be pedantic...
+3
level 76
Aug 27, 2015
Do you really spell it "kilogramme"? I don't know anyone who does that, or even anyone who ever has done that. Anyway, let the Americans have their spellings. There is almost no way of knowing who is actually right for many of them.
+2
level 67
Aug 29, 2015
The English language is not a mess, it is because of its ability to absorb words from different languages and to have straightforward common sense meanings that have given it the ability to be used by all the world as a universal language. You don't have to speak it perfectly to be understood as is proved by the great numbers of non-English speaking people using this quiz.
+2
level 68
Jun 18, 2018
Nope, a lot of the French -our and -re were added in the 1800s for some reason. A lot of Latin words were suddenly Frenchified. The Americans kept trucking with the actual English spellings.
+1
level 32
May 4, 2014
There is the Queen's English, and then there are mistakes.
+1
level 30
Dec 1, 2015
Queen who? Of what?
+1
level 67
Apr 25, 2016
Rhubarb
+1
level 44
Aug 27, 2014
I'm British and spell all of these words the British way - but it does seem to me that we have made it very difficult for ourselves, the American spellings are much more phonetic than ours...
+1
level 72
Nov 14, 2014
i am american and i spell the majority of the words on this quiz the british way
+1
level 59
Nov 14, 2014
I don't know if showing the more complicated British spellings was the point of this quiz, but seriously, mate. Either way, in my opinion, English speakers should make a few simplifications for foreigners if they want to keep their language The Global Language. While Brits and Americans (and others such as Scots and Aussies) are fighting, Chinese is stepping up. At least Mandarin has only one official variety.
+2
level 76
Nov 14, 2014
I thought there were multiple written versions of Mandarin, and even the "simplified" Mandarin is still mind-bogglingly complex. Though I agree written English is overdue for an overhaul. It should be replaced by some sort of International Stark, like in Ender's Game. At the very least clean up the spelling and alphabet. After that a simplified grammar would be helpful, too.
+1
level 45
Jul 25, 2018
Making English a uniform language would mean destroying all the different versions of it across the world, including the regional ones within countries. This would be a great pity and will never happen because people like speaking it their own way.
+1
level 76
Jan 9, 2019
I bet you're wrong. The world is growing smaller all the time.
+1
level 61
Jul 4, 2015
Scots are Brits.
+1
level 45
Nov 14, 2014
These are the spellings of the English language. American English teachers really need to shape up, they do a shoddy job at teaching the Queen's.
+1
level 66
Nov 14, 2014
Don't forget things like orient / orientate (the verb) and preventive / preventative.
+1
level 60
Nov 14, 2014
Some of these might need some context
+2
level 39
Nov 14, 2014
Some of these "arguments" occur because so many British people have such poor spelling (and grammar), that they can't spell many words correctly, anyway. I am British and I cringe when reading badly spellled comments on social media and the use of appalling grammar by television presenters. People commenting on this quiz that they have never spelt the word as storey, have no idea that it means each floor of a building! Having said all this, I do agree that a lot of American spellings are very odd to the British.
+2
level 46
Nov 14, 2014
This quiz just makes me feel so angry at Americans
+1
level 30
Dec 1, 2015
Cry cry. Don't talk to us if you don't like it! lol
+1
level 52
Jan 7, 2017
Don't worry, we don't
+1
level 28
Jan 24, 2017
We just don't see the need for our spellings to be so French
+1
level 72
Nov 14, 2014
i can't believe only 34 percent got aeon...i am from usa and had no idea that in usa it is actually spelled eon
+1
level 57
Nov 14, 2014
Might I point out we spell 'story' the same way that you do?
+2
level 75
Jan 2, 2017
I'm American and I was taught that storey is a section of a building, and story is what I tell my grandkids to bore them to death. Have those meanings changed?
+1
level 35
Jan 7, 2017
I believe the lack of context is confusing people.
+1
level 67
Nov 14, 2014
Aluminium is a weird one, mostly because it's American's who break from the international standard and insist on a variant. Not that all the others are variants, it's just there's not an international standard like IUPAC.
+1
level 75
Jan 2, 2017
Personally I would prefer if we changed to aluminium. It's much easier to pronounce than aluminuminum.
+1
level 36
Feb 22, 2017
America actually tried to change Aluminium to Alumina (Which is basically Aluminium Oxide -_-) and they threw a strop because Britain said no to the change so they insisted that they should change Sulphur to Sulfur... Every British chemist was FURIOUS.
+1
level 52
Mar 10, 2017
Then again, America has never been one to follow British standards, eh?
+1
level 33
Nov 14, 2014
Hahahahahaha...TITbit. (I'm not 12, but my inner 12 year old came out when I saw that).
+1
level 20
Nov 14, 2014
100% with 55 seconds left!
+2
level 58
Nov 14, 2014
As a Canadian, I use pretty much a 50/50 split of the words. Some look pretty stupid, some I can understand. "Likable" looks like it should read lickable. I use both gray/grey because I never know which one is right. Colour, airplane, analyze, realize, mold, defence, ageing, traveller, catalogue, plow,curb, eon, tidbit. Sometime I use both spellings; pyjamas/pajamas, racket/racquet, meter/metre, center/centre. Then there are some that are just wrong. Kilogramme, aging, kerb, behove.
+1
level 75
Jan 2, 2017
It seems as though behove should be the past tense of behoove. :)
+1
level 44
Mar 24, 2018
Huh. I'm Canadian too, but I use mould (the rest are the same though).
+1
level 36
Nov 15, 2014
I didn't even recognise half of them. I'm so used to the British spelling that I had no idea what the definition of the words were. Like Check
+1
level 45
Mar 30, 2017
Same
+1
level 21
Nov 15, 2014
Us Canadians spell this way as well.
+1
level 21
Nov 15, 2014
Well, most of them. We definitely don't say aeroplane.
+1
level 59
Mar 30, 2017
Or tyre.
+1
level 71
Mar 30, 2017
We Canadians spell this way as well.
+2
level 75
Mar 30, 2017
Except for analyse, realise, aeroplane, ageing, aluminium, tyre, plough, kilogramme, paediatric, oestrogen, titbit, behove, kerb, and arguably pyjamas and moustache.
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2017
Nice! LOL
+1
level 51
Nov 15, 2014
I'd invite anyone who thinks either British or American English is "more pure" to undergo a reality check. Written English has only had standardised spellings since the production of the first dictionary, so the debate about correct versus incorrect is really just "I like this one more, so it must be better."
+1
level 58
Mar 30, 2017
Except, you've proved your own argument wrong. The first English dictionary was published 1604. There's a 172 year gap between English Dictionaries and American independence. So, yes British English is, as you put it, more pure.
+1
level 67
Jan 27, 2019
Oh, you mean this dictionary? Robert Cawdrey's A Table Alphabeticall, contayning and teaching the true writing and vnderstanding of hard vsuall English words, borrowed from the Hebrew, Greeke, Latine, or French &c, in which are spellings such as ballance (balance), eccho (echo), franticke (frantic), ieopardie (jeopardy), maniacque (maniac), and ouall (oval), and includes US spellings like naturalize, solemnize, tyrannize, and vapor?
+1
level 78
Nov 16, 2014
Ov kors letz do a wai wiv yu es n brit speling difrensiz n dzust rite wot we think iz akseptabl wether itz rite or rong gramma and punkchuashun r all so irelivent sorted innit? Just learn to spell, Brits do it the British way and Americans don’t. Live with it. British Kerb (edge of pavement/sidewalk) does not have the same meaning as curb (restraint): British Story (a tale) does not have the same meaning as storey (building level) British Cheque (bank document) does not have the same meaning as check (restraint/halt/go over) British Racquet (tennis bat) and racket (noise) not the same. And Pajamas are jimjams! As for Aluminum! Give me strength… :-/
+1
level 37
May 29, 2015
very funny
+1
level 54
Dec 16, 2016
Agree with the differences though. Same for tyre (as in on your wheel) and tire (feeling buggered)
+1
level 32
Nov 17, 2014
Maybe American english has just been made easier due to a low percentage of the population that actually speak English. (A higher percentage of the Dutch population speak English than that of the USA)
+1
level 45
Mar 30, 2017
it was the british settlers who devised these spellings.
+1
level 58
Nov 19, 2014
Clues should read "Meter (length)", "Check (bank account)", "Racket (sports)", "Curb (roadside)". In British a meter is a measuring device, like for how much electricity you've used, a racket can be a criminal enterprise or a loud noise, curb is the verb meaning to restrict or curtail and check has all sorts of other meanings on both sides of the Atlantic.
+1
level 58
Nov 19, 2014
I didn't even realise (ha!) until reading the comments that people have thought that the question implies "story" means all forms of the word are spelt with the 'e'. And I didn't even think of the connotation of "to tire"! So, to my list add "story (floor of building)" and "tire (car part)".

I'm a proud British speller, but I do not align myself with any concept of British spelling being superior or even older than American spellings. I once read a stupid British author who singled out "gotten" as a "tedious Americanism". No doubt there are many barbarisms that America has imposed on the glorious English language, but "gotten" is not one of them. Apparently that author has forGOTTEN, not only that word but gotten's appearance in the King James Bible, right there at the start of Genesis (Eve: "I have gotten a man from the Lord"). And in any case it's a beautiful word, a real "cellar door" as Tolkien once said.
+1
level 31
Nov 25, 2014
I never knew "gotten" was a word! In elementary school they would get mad when we used it, which I found weird because my British aunt would use it.
+1
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
When I was at primary school, the word "got" was banned from any story we wrote. We had to use an alternative like "receive" or "became". The teacher was very good at expanding our vocabulary. And I still cringe when people use the word "got" even today!
+1
level 75
Mar 29, 2017
You've got to be kidding. I gotta think about that one. Gotcha! :)
+1
level 41
Nov 28, 2014
People are ridiculous. All spellings are made up, so who cares which one you think is "better"?
+1
level 73
Nov 28, 2014
In decades of reading and teaching in the UK, I can't recall seeing 'aeon' used, even though it might be grammatically correct. 'Eon', however, is relatively common.
+1
level 56
Mar 29, 2016
Eon really isn't most common in the UK. I guess it depends what schools you were teaching at.
+1
level 69
Nov 28, 2014
I write color, analyze, airplane, center, realize, meter, defense and check, but likeable, mould, ageing, moustache, catalogue, traveller, pyjamas, kilogramme, paediatric, manoeuvre. 8:10 for the British!
+1
level 72
Nov 28, 2014
As someone who was brought up in a British spelling environment, I think the spelling that Americans use is generally more phonetic and would make a better spelling standard for the language we call "English". The only exception would the American usage of 'Aluminum' which is just plain odd, since there is a scientifically internationally accepted standard there and that's Aluminium. Americans don't say Sodum, Lithum, Cadmum, or Strontum - so would American spellers latch on to an irregular spelling for just that one word?
+1
level 69
Apr 1, 2017
we don't pronounce it Al-Loo-Min-E-Um. Its just A-Loo-Mi-Num
+1
level 64
Nov 28, 2014
storey and kerb look so ugly ew
+1
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder.
+1
level 30
Jun 9, 2017
storey as in second floor we spell a piece of fiction a story
+1
level 67
Jan 27, 2019
Sure, and in the US we would call the second floor a story as well.
+1
level 49
Nov 28, 2014
Check before you cash your cheque. British use both spellings, both have different meanings.
+1
level 39
Apr 1, 2017
There are several examples of this, for example, a meter is a measuring device, but a metre is a unit of distance, and a racket is a din, but a racquet is for playing tennis.
+1
level 49
Apr 1, 2017
Yep totally down here in Australia the same. Also racquet with different meanings( racket- noise)
+1
level 26
Nov 29, 2014
I am british and i know that some of these are stereotypes. For example: we spell story just the same way as you americans do!
+1
level 39
Dec 3, 2014
Dhian. No, we don't! We use storey when used to mean a floor in a building - as so many on here have already pointed out.
+1
level 60
Dec 29, 2014
I'm a New Zealander (but I live in Australia) and I got them all correct, I'm quite proud considering that NZ has adopted many US spellings (though we'll probably never drop the u from colour and other like words).
+1
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
Yep, for a New Zealander this quiz is easy as. We are familiar with both British and American spellings, though British is the "correct" version. (Except I have never seen kilogramme and aeon used here).
+2
level 57
Feb 6, 2015
Can I just say that a lot of these are weird to me, even though I am actually British? Firstly, aluminium should be spelled like that since there is BLATANTLY a second I in there, and we spell kilogram the same way you do (at least I do)
+1
level 24
Apr 1, 2017
The American pronunciation is a-LOOM-i-num. We neither write nor pronounce a second i in the word. I was really fascinated the first time I heard the British pronunciation fairly recently.
+2
level 29
Feb 15, 2015
I'm British and a few of these need to be made clearer. In the UK, check and cheque are both used to mean different things. So are storey and story. Also, we spell kilogram the same as you do so I think that one is wrong. Lastly, why would you spell aluminium aluminum? That changes the sound of the word so should therefore mean something else.
+2
level 24
Apr 1, 2017
We literally pronounce it a-LOOM-i-num. There's no second i written or pronounced.
+1
level 66
Apr 2, 2017
Then you (and Americans everywhere) pronounce it incorrectly.
+2
level 67
Dec 7, 2017
Hey, we're just calling it what its discoverer, Humphrey Davy, called it. Not our fault you all decided to go with something different. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium#Etymology
+5
level 17
Feb 20, 2015
Both "storey" and "story" are used but for completely different things, as are "cheque" and "check"
+3
level 45
Jun 4, 2015
Also curb and kerb.
+3
level 36
Nov 2, 2017
And mold, mould, racket, racquet, meter ad metre!
+1
level 29
Jan 13, 2018
uummmmm.... No. They all have the same meaning
+2
level 44
Mar 12, 2015
Good quiz! However, I have a couple of comments: a) "pyjamas"/"pajamas" and "aluminium"/"aluminum" are not strictly speaking differences in spelling of the same words, but in use of words which slightly different and differently pronounced; b) I think it is unfortunate to include "story" and "check" into this list, because those are perfectly acceptable British spellings, even though only applicable for some usage of the American spelling.
+2
level 38
Dec 5, 2017
I believe that "check" is used to check/check on something, (i.e., let's check the figures, or please check your coat) whereas "cheque" is the instrument used to withdraw funds from your bank account (i.e., the cheque is in the mail).
+1
level 29
Jan 13, 2018
and your point is?
+1
level 21
Sep 8, 2015
Noone uses 'Kilogramme', in Britain or Australia.
+2
level 56
Mar 29, 2016
Noone? Who he? Perhaps No-one or even nobody would work better.
+4
level 72
Oct 6, 2016
Peter Noone of Herman's Hermits. He apparently delights when alternating between UK and Oz in retaining the archaic form of the spelling of "kilogramme"
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2017
Something tells me you're into something good.
+1
level 52
Feb 4, 2018
No milk for you today!
+5
level 27
Oct 23, 2015
I hate this title. It should be called 'The proper spellings of words that stupid Americans can't be bothered to use'
+1
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
I can't decide, lemons are sour.
+1
level 67
Aug 17, 2017
Spot on Lemons!
+2
level 33
Sep 22, 2017
British spellings are WRONG
+3
level 63
Oct 23, 2015
Finally a quiz where the answers are spelled correctly
+1
level 30
Dec 1, 2015
Americans: declaring independence from the British over and over and over and over and over and over again.
+1
level 59
Jan 3, 2016
Nice. Always fun to correct American spelling. Alooominum!!!
+1
level 31
Jan 18, 2016
there's no 'e' in story
+2
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
Not so smart.
+1
level 61
Feb 16, 2016
Great quiz! I had no idea that a lot of these words were spelled differently. With regards to the debate occurring in the comments, I agree that that the "better" dialect is completely subjective. Living my entire life in the United States, it looks weird and incorrect when I see "realise" or "ageing," but I know that's just me.
+1
level 45
Mar 14, 2016
Some of these are a bit outdated, I'm British and I got some wrong as they're rarely used. Still an interesting quiz, wish people would stop claiming that the US just randomly butchered the language - American English derives its spelling mostly from Latin while English English derives its spelling mostly from French.
+2
level 56
Mar 29, 2016
'American' English (FFS) derives its spelling mostly from laziness.
+2
level 28
Apr 13, 2016
Think some defininitions of words are needed
+1
level 69
May 26, 2016
I wonder how many people often berate Americans over their refusal to use metric whilst simultaneously insisting on retaining British spellings because.... tradition (ignoring the constant flux in spellings until relatively recent standardization). Plainly 'analyze' more accurately captures the pronunciation of that word than 'analyse'. Of course there are a few I'll stand firm on - 'aluminum' is just an odd American quirk, as no one else pronounces it that way.
+1
level 39
Jun 2, 2016
In Britain, we had metrics imposed on us by the government of the time. We had no choice!
+2
level 45
Mar 30, 2017
Implying English is a language that is "read". Should they have changed "who" to hoo? "bought" to "bawt"? "laugh" to "larf"? American spellings are plainly more phonetically spelt than British spellings.
+2
level 29
Jan 13, 2018
it'd be 'laf' imo
+1
level 64
Feb 28, 2019
The problem with spelling English phonetically is that there are so many dialects. Take "Water". I (southern English) pronounce it "wawta"; Americans pronounce it "wahdr"; a Scot might pronounce it "wa'rr", or "Wo'rr" and so on. There are countless words which would present this problem - "Dahdr" or "Dawta" or "Do'rr" (daughter); "Satuhday", "Sadrrday" "Sa'ahdeey" "Sa'rrdeh" "Setuhdye" (Saturday). So whose phonetic spelling?
+1
level 38
Feb 4, 2018
Just about the entire world, with the exception of the UK, USA (and possibly Australia and New Zealand) use the metric system. Why, according to comedian Trevor Noah, even drug dealers are now using metrics.
+2
level 52
Feb 4, 2018
Australia and NZ definitely use metric.
+1
level 43
Jun 20, 2016
If you are British and spelling metre as meter and centre as center then you are clearly wrong and should question your schooling! As for Storey, the clue is misleading. This spelling of storey refers to a floor in a building, not a tale. Same for check. To check something we spell it the same as you, cheque is a form of payment. We spell racket when describing a din the same, racquet refers to sports equipment.
+1
level 72
Oct 6, 2016
But isn't the clue in the nature of the quiz? i.e. things what are spelt differently in US vs UK? It either ain't difficult or adds a bit of thinking required to work out which story / check / racket it refers to.
+1
level 53
Jan 9, 2019
What if I'm talking about the gas meter?
+1
level 7
Jul 6, 2016
gos im English and i use half of the american spellings instead naturally :'D
+1
level 70
Sep 22, 2016
You forgot one...AMERICAN SPELLING: soccer; BRITISH SPELLING: football. :-)
+1
level 72
Oct 6, 2016
Jeez, I thought you Yanks only pronounced Aluminium incorrectly, not spelt it like that too!
+1
level 60
Jan 9, 2017
Same!
+1
level 75
Mar 29, 2017
We don't use spelt either, unless talking about a grain. It's always "spelled" in American English.
+2
level 75
Jan 2, 2017
Apparently there is some official body in the US who determines these things (for court reporters, at least). I used to type court transcripts for a relative who was a court reporter and she had to go once a year for a grammar and spelling seminar to learn the changes governing their grammar and punctuation rules for official court documents. Over the course of many years we have lost commas, regained commas, seen spellings change and then change back, etc. Without changes we would all still be speaking Old English or one of the various dialects, and we wouldn't be able to understand people from different areas, even in the English-speaking world. Vive la difference as long as it doesn't become so different we can no longer communicate.
+1
level 65
Jun 4, 2018
Gadzooks! So that's how the colonials manage it. They actually go on courses to learn how to spell incorrectly. The blighters!
+1
level 43
Jan 7, 2017
You mean the proper spelling :)
+1
level 52
Mar 29, 2017
Brit here. I have never seen kilogram spelled as kilogramme anywhere. Program/programme might be a better, less controversial addition to the quiz. Kerb/curb, tire. racket, and storey/story are the same depending on context, so maybe some could be added?
+1
level 38
Mar 29, 2017
You would all fall off your chairs then at this latest adjustment to the American English language: Floor being used when the correct word is ground. I was taught that a FLOOR is inside a building, whereas the GROUND is outside.
+1
level 72
Mar 30, 2017
Strangely though, we (UK) would be more likely to spell gramme than kilogramme. I guess it's the SI-recognised version (but that contradicts meter/metre being different) ...and ironcially my spellchecker is flagging up all those British spellings, including recognise)
+1
level 72
Mar 30, 2017
ironically - now there's another word which is different between UK and US ;-)
+1
level 32
Mar 29, 2017
Only reason I got 100%-- my best friend is British and it annoys the heck out of me whenever she writes so much as a note
+2
level 49
Mar 30, 2017
In Australia we tend to use the British spellings for everything. Apart from "aeon" and "kilogramme" (which seem to not be widely used even in Britain these days) I would spell all of these words the British way, but I am also familiar with all of the American spellings. Our way of spelling things generally makes more sense to me, but I do sometimes think that use of the letter "z" is merited for words like "analyse".
+2
level 43
Mar 30, 2017
Is that z as in zed or z as in zee?
+1
level 59
Mar 30, 2017
Americans changed the original spelling (directly linked to french or latin in the majority of those exemples) to fit their ill-pronounciation. TYPICAL ! FAKE NEWS !
+2
level 67
Dec 7, 2017
Except for "aluminum," where we're using the original name given by its discoverer ;)
+2
level 58
Mar 30, 2017
Historically, words that are derived from Greek or Roman roots should use the form/spelling -ize, -izing, -ization (and -yze in the case of analyze). Words that are derived from modern romantic/French roots, such as advertise, are always spelled with an 's' rather than a 'z', even in the US. The British started to shift towards the -ise, -ising, -isation spellings that prevail in the UK today in the late 19th and early 20th century: possibly because Greek and Latin started to become less important on the school curriculum, possibly because the "frenchification" of the language was more desirable (French had traditionally been a language of royal courts in earlier centuries, and so had a "classy" connotation). Some British bodies - such as the Oxford University Press - favour the original, classic -ize spellings even today. So, in that sense, the US form of these words is the original, and arguably correct spellings. ...Not sure it explains color, labor, favor, however.
+1
level 39
Mar 30, 2017
In a former job a new American customer insisted on a contract with American spelling for all freight documentation. Not wanting to get it wrong I asked if they meant American spelling of the English language but was told flatly 'we speak American, so spell it American' It was hard trying to treat them seriously after that.
+1
level 73
Mar 30, 2017
As a French guy, this quiz is actually quite easy because a lot of those words are in fact, borrowed from the French language, and in nearly all the cases, the British spelling is true to the original French one. For the other ones, you must not forget about Latin roots and Latin spellings œ and æ.
+1
level 76
Mar 30, 2017
œ and æ are not alternate spellings, they are letters that do not exist in English.
+1
level 76
Mar 30, 2017
OED: "A man going up stairs for a day raises 205 chiliogrammes to the height of a chiliometre." I am appalled that you British have abandoned this traditional spelling.
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2017
I dunno, I rather enjoy seeing the differences. Gives me an opportunity to assess what I say/spell, and why. We all get used to what we're used to, and see that as the mean, with everything else being a deviation.

I like the differences, although some, like uh-LOO-min-um/al-you-MIN-nee-um really make me re-think what I say. I wasn't aware there's an extra "i" that may or may not belong in there, which would absolutely impact how you pronounce it. But I have to admit, pronouncing the 1st two syllables of "alum..." as uh-LOOM instead of "al-yoo" does seem....silly, or even a bit uneducated.

It's tough thinking beyond what you're used to sometimes. But it's definitely worth the analysis, IMO.
+2
level 56
Mar 30, 2017
I'm English, and honestly, the American spellings are better. Much more logical, and easier for L1 and L2 speakers alike. The only ones I can understand are aeroplane, aluminium, and titbit, since that's how we say it here. As for the rest - just have a reform. It's a fundamentally broken system (if you could call it a 'system' at all - it's verging on logographic.) Most other European languages do it regularly, so we definitely can.
+2
level 67
Aug 17, 2017
How about No!
+3
level 58
Mar 30, 2017
My god, it's amazing how a fun quiz can attract so much rhetoric and at times anger. We are all different, the world would be boring if we were all similar and, do you know what, I guessed that 'tire' was used to be the vehicular definition and not an example of lethargy. The sad fact here in Britain is that a huge number of the younger population (and an increasing number of older indigenes) can't spell, use grammar (especially apostrophes) or even communicate properly. Americans and Brits use different spellings and sometimes even different words. That's life! No-one is right or wrong (except maybe where jam/jelly is concerned!)
+1
level 33
Feb 21, 2018
Jam has chunks of the fruit in it and Jelly doesn't. ( I'm American btw)
+1
level 66
Mar 30, 2017
I am English. I agree American spellings are often better, but was brought up to use the English spellings. The strange spellings depend on the origin of the word, whether Latin, Greek, French or whatever. I however use "chile" and have no idea what Behoove means.
+1
level 58
Mar 30, 2017
Change quiz name to "Correct Spellings Quiz" tia
+2
level 64
Mar 31, 2017
It was at this moment that sulfuratus >realised< he had been using a mix of AE and BE all the time.
+2
level 38
Mar 31, 2017
OMG!! I live in Ireland so some are the same and some aren't and I was so confused!
+2
level 43
Apr 9, 2017
I'm British and have never seen Kilogram spelled Kilogramme
+2
level 45
Apr 12, 2017
This is way Australia's vocab is messed up. A mixture of American and English...
+2
level 30
Jun 9, 2017
I'm an aussie right, and I just remembered my favourite american mix up moment. I was a hotel room looking around the room (with my computer open), and my american colleague walks in saying "what's up?" I respond with "Can't find a powerpoint" He walks out and returns with powerpoint open with on his computer
+1
level 49
Jun 18, 2017
I too am British and kilogramme is the correct English spelling; we use gramme for the smaller weight not gram.
+2
level 27
Jul 27, 2017
I love how Americans have their own personal spelling of kilogramme: a unit of measurement that they don't even use.
+1
level 39
Dec 15, 2017
Ha! Thought this as well! :D
+1
level 38
Feb 4, 2018
^ Totally agree!
+1
level 33
Feb 21, 2018
As an American, I can testify that the imperial system is terrible and I have no idea why it is use here, and why it hasn't been switched over. If the next president promised to switch measuring systems I would probably vote for them just based off of that.
+1
level 44
Mar 24, 2018
Canada uses kilogram.
+1
level 28
Jul 29, 2017
full marks blud
+1
level 61
Sep 25, 2017
Though my family lineage is largely English, I must make the point that many of the American spellings are simpler, and thus facilitate communication more easily. Also, since Americans now far out-number Brits, the new-world spellings would be preferred in a purely democratic sense.
+1
level 52
Oct 20, 2017
You may be forgetting that, were just half of Commonwealth members able to speak English (and preferential to British English) they would still outnumber Americans by about 350%.
+1
level 52
Oct 20, 2017
'A lexicographer's business is solely to collect, arrange, and define the words that usage presents to his hands. He has no right to proscribe words; he is to present them as they are.' -Noah Webster, who went on to prescribe a whole ton of alternate spellings in his dictionary.
+1
level 25
Oct 31, 2017
I'm an Aussie who learnt the American way for at least my first five years of school, so I'm a bit of a switcheroo. I like to use the Aussie/British spelling nowadays, though. I can't recall ever seeing some of the British spellings in this quiz before, being much more familiar with their American counterpart.
+1
level 39
Dec 15, 2017
Missed a few, helps if you know how to spell the words in the first place lol
+1
level 15
Jan 14, 2018
3:14 to spare GG
+1
level 26
Feb 4, 2018
Isn’t “eon” “eeyore”? Do you even know what “eon” means? It’s the sound that a donkey makes! Please fix the answer to “eon”.
+1
level 67
Jan 27, 2019
Are... are you joking? I'm honestly not sure if you're being serious or not, but just in case you are they're talking about this word, not the sound a donkey makes (which, for the record, is usually transcribed as "hee-haw" in the US.)
+1
level 26
Feb 16, 2018
People spell donkey noises “eeyore” there.
+1
level 33
Feb 21, 2018
Can we have a version of this quiz the other way around? British words you have to guess the American spelling of?
+1
level 49
Apr 22, 2018
Behove? Aeon? Never used those words so no idea what they mean or shows to spell them. Otherwise, all correct
+1
level 50
Apr 23, 2018
Several of these words have gone out of fashion even for the British (and by extension, us Aussies). The British/Australian spell checkers now are constantly telling me that spelling travelled or traveller is wrong, as is the case for many words that used to be spelled with a double 'L.'
+1
level 64
Feb 28, 2019
Then they are probably not British/Australian spellcheckers!
+1
level 38
Oct 11, 2018
English is my second language, taught to me by Europeans; perhaps that's why I find the English spelling of words easier (except for "kerb", which I've never heard of until now).
+1
level 67
Oct 30, 2018
British spelling is very pleasing--except for where they replace a "z" with "s" or have "re" instead of "er".
+1
level 49
Nov 12, 2018
I didn't know that Americans spell aluminium differently. I just thought they were pronouncing it wrongly! Also some words are now spelt the same as I can't remember the last time I saw kilogram spelt with a mme
+1
level 38
Nov 19, 2018
So that was just french spelling most of the time eheh
+1
level 39
Jan 9, 2019
In New Zealand British spelling is used for lots of words, and US spelling has also influenced NZ spelling. I mention this because although NZ English has more in common with British English than US, I feel I am removed enough from Britain to accept that plenty of US spellings are far more logical than the British equivalent. For example, dropping u's makes life easier, after all, we aren't French. Also, removing silent vowels makes great sense.
+2
level 29
Jan 9, 2019
british spelling =correct spelling
+2
level 31
Feb 8, 2019
Exactly. One of the worst examples is how they spell tap.
+1
level 51
Jan 9, 2019
pretty easy, only racquet (was close) storey ( i guess not the tale but a storey building) and traveller, got the best of me. Never heard of behoove (sounds like someone trying to say behave haha, maybe an allo allo character). Aeon and kerb took a second look. This is gonna screw me up though haha, I think I allready used words of both "langauage/dialect" but I think now it will be even more mixed...
+1
level 68
Jan 9, 2019
Ever since the United States kicked out England with the help of the French it's perplexing how much they've changed their spelling to be more French. Why did the U.S. retain the correct spelling? Imagine if England got conquered by King Louis in the American Revolution, they'd all be speaking French. Oh wait, apparently they are.
+1
level 35
Jan 9, 2019
Us Canadians use basically all the british spellings.
+1
level 67
May 9, 2019
As we do in Australia also. Except for kilogramme, which I've not seen outside of France.
+1
level 42
Mar 23, 2019
Why would you change aluminium to aluminum when every other element pretty much ends in -ium? Seems a bit odd, and confusing. Like you don’t call it cadmum titanum or sodum, so why should aluminium be different?
+1
level 67
May 9, 2019
I find the US insistence on changing the name of the element consistent with their insistence on using feet, gallons and pounds for units of measurement. They seem to enjoy being different, even if the rest of the world just thinks they're wrong for doing so.
+1
level 58
Mar 30, 2019
First try. 100%. Being french helps a bit :)
+1
level 37
May 23, 2019
I'm Australian so we use many British spellings but didn't even know what some of American words were until I saw the British equivalent. We don't use kilogramme and i've never heard of a titbit or tidbit. Very surprised there was no jail/gaol question though
+1
level 16
May 24, 2019
i guess
+1
level 27
Jun 21, 2019
Curb is spelt curb in Britain, Kilogram is also the same