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British Words Quiz #1

Translate these British words into their American equivalents.
Dear nitpicker: this quiz does NOT suggest that all British people use these words
Try the opposite quiz here
Last updated: September 04, 2018
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British
American
Chips
Fries
Crisps
Chips
Football
Soccer
Queue
Line
Flat
Apartment
Loo
Bathroom
Lorry
Truck
Barrister
Lawyer
High Street
Main Street
British
American
Whinge
Complain
Petrol
Gas
Ta
Thanks
Zed
Zee
Pissed
Drunk
Fag
Cigarette
Trainers
Sneakers
Jacket Potato
Baked Potato
Way Out
Exit
British
American
Biscuit
Cookie
Bonnet (car)
Hood
Silencer (car)
Muffler
Nappy
Diaper
First Floor
Second Floor
Full Stop
Period
Chemist
Pharmacy
Zebra Crossing
Crosswalk
Dodgems
Bumper Cars
+1
level 33
Jul 27, 2011
21/23 totally didn't know second floor or period.
+1
level 32
Apr 23, 2014
i only found out period from how i met your mother.
+2
level 68
Nov 27, 2018
Perhaps you should rephrase that. TMI.
+4
level 18
Aug 9, 2011
Line; baked potato; apartment; truck; lawyer; bumper cars; complain; thanks; drunk; cigarette; exit are all completely normal British words! Some of this is ridiculous, particularly exit and thanks!
+8
level 16
Jan 7, 2014
It's more about the fact that American's don't use the British terms than that British people don't use the ones that have been designated American versions
+1
level 32
Apr 23, 2014
good point there...
+1
level 38
Apr 18, 2019
^ Exactly! - The English may use the American terms but Americans don't use the British ones.
+1
level 58
Oct 26, 2014
I agree, Iain - I found this quiz very frustrating
+2
level 44
Nov 27, 2014
The quiz is about words we use that Americans don't. We use words like exit and drunk like Americans do, but Americans don't use words like way out and pissed like we do.
+1
level 67
Nov 29, 2014
I think the quiz is the wrong way round ...... but anyway, here in Australia we use all the words given for both sides, just sometimes one word or the other with no particular preference.
+1
level 20
Nov 28, 2018
In the Uk we use both terms for most of these as well. We also have hundreds of other words for half of these too!
+4
level 36
Aug 20, 2011
should put 'bum bag' on this list to give us childish Brits a giggle.
+1
level 32
Aug 29, 2011
As a Canadian I also use most of these words already, like Chips, Barrister, High Street, Pissed, Way Out, Bonnet... Great quiz though!
+1
level 49
Oct 15, 2014
I never use any of those words and I'm Canadian, I guess you're from somewhere settle almost entirely by the British.
+1
level 67
Nov 29, 2014
Obviously French Canadian if you NEVER use any of these words!
+1
level 67
Nov 27, 2018
Pissed as a colloquialism for drunk. Chips only if having them with fish. Other than that, this Canadian agrees that we use the American terms virtually exclusively.
+1
level 46
Nov 27, 2018
I'm from the Maritimes, which is probably the most British part of Canada (apart from NFLD). In my experience, we don't use these terms regularly, but I have always been aware of them...Growing up in pre-cable TV times anyway we got a lot of UK television...My mother used to torture us with Coronation Street every day...
+1
level 44
Nov 9, 2011
Haha, same here @PurrrpleCat, Rugrats taught me all I know! Yeah, Aussies use a lot of words for the same things, we'll say flat, apartment and unit, crisps, chips and potato chips, pissed, drunk and blind and all sorts of things. Though we don't say period. Period.
+2
level 44
Nov 9, 2011
I've had a revelation!!! When they say "Period" in US TV shows, that's effectively an Aussie saying "Full stop"! Wow, can't believe I never realised that before...
+1
level 47
Nov 10, 2011
It is the first floor because the American first floor is the British ground floor, and the first floor is the floor above the ground floor. I have no idea how I know this conidering I am American and don't know anyone British.
+1
level 23
Nov 14, 2011
Ta, pissed and fag are just the slang words for those things, and complain and exit aren't any more American than they are British. And what on earth is a silencer? :S
+1
level 35
Feb 8, 2012
18/23. Half of the American words are English words as well.
+1
level 16
Mar 26, 2012
this is all very stereotypical, I am British and 8/23 of these words we use here. we don't all speak posh or cockney.
+1
level 27
Jun 6, 2015
I got them all and I'm english
+1
level 22
Jul 1, 2012
Totally misunderstood what was meant by fag. Do the Americans really not have a more interesting word for "whinge"? I'm sure I've heard the word "bitch" used. Mobile phone would be a good word for this quiz, wouldn't it?
+2
level 64
Feb 26, 2013
Whine also worked.
+2
level 50
Jun 25, 2014
It's also a swear word. That's why it's not on there.
+1
level 28
Sep 2, 2012
good one! Good to know if the red coats get in my face again! ;)
+1
level 22
Nov 28, 2012
I'm English (from York) and I don't think I've ever said 'way out' rather than 'exit'.
+2
level 54
Dec 3, 2018
Have you ever been to a train station? Or any public place where the way out/exit might be marked?
+1
level 41
Dec 18, 2012
15. not great.
+2
level 40
Dec 24, 2012
Why do you lot call petrol 'gas'? It's a liquid, not a gas. Strange.
+3
level 56
Nov 27, 2018
It's short for gasoline.
+1
level 33
Feb 17, 2013
The difference between most of these words are slang and proper - not british and american. I have never, in my entire life, heard any one say Ta. I am British.
+4
level 64
Feb 26, 2013
I'm also British and Ta is used regularly in my experience. Maybe it's a regional thing but I doubt that as I've heard it all over the UK in my travels.
+2
level 48
Mar 7, 2013
I was stationed in Britain for 5 years and heard it all the time. I was told it stands for Thanks Awefully. I'm sure they were just taking the piss out of me though
+2
level 40
Sep 28, 2015
Yes, they were! It has simply come into use as it's easier for very young children to say than "thank you".
+3
level 36
Oct 28, 2015
i hear ta but its probably more of a brummey thing since im from birmingham
+3
level 61
Mar 11, 2018
I have heard ta-ta as in good-bye, we use it in Canada from time to time.
+1
level 61
Mar 16, 2018
In Canada, i've heard ta used more when asking for something from a toddler or baby, although i have heard it used as a way of saying goodbye but mostly by senior citizens i would say.
+1
level 44
Apr 30, 2013
Right after I pressed "give up" I remembered half of the ones I left blank... :/
+1
level 40
Jun 9, 2013
You should accept shoes for trainers.
+4
level 35
Jul 14, 2013
I'm British, so for me I was guessing the American words, and I spent ages trying different variations of the words angry and annoyed for "pissed" until I realised it was "drunk" I didn't realise they called biscuits cookies, either. It's funny how many words they have different words for. I never knew there were so many of them.
+5
level 37
Oct 21, 2015
I'm Canadian and was typing variations of angry too. didn't get to drunk until I was out of time, and was pissed I missed it. lol
+1
level 61
Mar 11, 2018
Same here, in Canada if someone is pissed, they are angry as in "pissed-off" . Not really used that much to describe someone who is drunk, sloshed, wasted. Should do one for Canadian / American words.
+1
level 38
May 29, 2018
On tihs side of the pond, the term sometimes used is "pissy drunk"
+2
level 61
Mar 16, 2018
In Canada i've heard pissed used for both drunk and angry, don't know if its age thing or a regional thing though.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
American here and I've heard pissed off, meaning angry, and it's often called P-O'ed.
+1
level 18
Oct 30, 2013
This is quite hard as an Australian
+4
level 16
Jan 7, 2014
Don't understand the compaints on this quiz. Lived in England (and not in London) all my life and all of these are very common words which I use and hear regularly. Good quiz I thought.
+1
level 48
Mar 25, 2018
I agre. It says "This quiz does NOT suggest that all British people use these words 100% of the time".
+1
level 47
Jan 26, 2014
never use ta its a northern term
+1
level 48
Feb 26, 2014
I heard it all over Norfolk and Suffolk when I lived there. Apparently, its expanded
+1
level 45
Feb 27, 2014
Definitely heard in the Midlands as well!
+1
level 36
Oct 28, 2015
west?
+1
level 35
Nov 27, 2015
Basically it's not a Southern term, here in Hampshire, and all the local counties words like Ta are never used
+2
level 64
Nov 27, 2018
I don't agree it's predominantly a Northern thing in my experience. I'm from the South (and have also lived in Hampshire and many other southern counties), and hear it just as much in the south as the north. It's certainly not the case that it's never used here.
+1
level 72
Apr 10, 2019
Believ it originated up North but now people use it where I live (Suffolk), and where my Cousins live (Hampshire)
+1
level 70
Feb 28, 2016
For some reason I thought "ta" was Australian (exclusively so).
+2
level 43
Apr 1, 2016
I live in Hampshire and I use it all the time. I dont think its a location thing but I might be wrong. I might be from 'oop north' at heart
+1
level 35
May 8, 2016
Im also from Hampshire, but can safely say I naver hear Ta used
+1
level 27
Aug 21, 2018
i am from Hampshire and i use Ta a lot
+1
level 54
Dec 3, 2018
I hear it in Sussex as well. I suspect it's a class difference, rather than a regional one.
+1
level 12
May 6, 2016
I'm from Liverpool and that's how everyone says Thanks :)
+1
level 45
May 6, 2018
I hear it often in Yorkshire.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
Tom Barnaby says it, so it must be real - at least in Midsomer. :)
+1
level 50
Feb 14, 2014
We usually say exhaust, not silencer.
+2
level 78
Feb 26, 2014
The silencer is only part of the exhaust.
+1
level 17
Feb 23, 2014
How about accepting pedestrian crossing?
+1
level 70
Feb 28, 2016
Agreed. We definitely call it a "pedestrian crossing" as well as a crosswalk.
+4
level 46
Mar 27, 2016
Zebra crossings are for the UK's vast zebra population though, contrary to popular belief they are not for pedestrians
+2
level 69
Feb 26, 2014
British guy: Why don't Americans call it a queue when you're waiting for the bathroom? American guy: Because queue does not come before pee.
+1
level 69
Feb 26, 2014
Sorry, I just could not help myself.
+1
level 38
Jun 29, 2015
Are you a dad telling horrible dad jokes?!
+1
level 34
Feb 26, 2014
Most of these "english" words are just slang terms for the "american words" and NEVER has an englishmen used the word silencer, i had to look it up! silencer should be changed to exhaust
+1
level 34
Feb 26, 2014
and what do americans call cookies? because cookies are a type of biscuit, surely all biscuits are not cookies
+1
level 45
Feb 27, 2014
If I remember correctly: An English cracker equals an American biscuit, an English biscuit equals an American cookie, an English cookie is chocolate-chip etc...
+1
level 67
Aug 4, 2015
A Cracker (not the girl next door) is a square biscuit, not sweet, that can be used savoury (tomato & cheese) or sweet (jam etc) Biscuits in England are the Cookies of America. But these days so many of the same products are sold in England and USA that eventually they will loose the differences.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
In America, biscuits are round, quickbread rolls usually made with flour, baking powder, salt, fat, and milk. We eat them hot, slathered with butter and/or jelly (jam), or honey or molasses, or covered in milk gravy, or as sandwich bread for breakfast topped with eggs, ham, bacon, sausage, or fried chicken. They are probably closest to your scones except they don't have sugar. Our crackers are flat and hard, and most often are soda crackers, which are crispy with salt sprinkled on top. We crumble them into chili and soup, or eat cheese or peanut butter on them. Our cookies are the same as your chocolate chip cookies, except we have all kinds of flavors - buttery sugar cookies, peanut butter sandwich cookies, Oreos, oatmeal raisin, etc. We call shortbread and lemon bars cookies, too.
+1
level 78
Feb 26, 2014
The silencer is the large piece of the exhaust system near the tail end.
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2016
It's good to have a mechanic in the room.
+1
level 52
Aug 21, 2016
A silencer is part of the exhaust. It's definitely an English word.
+1
level 51
Feb 26, 2014
Please add "pedestrian crossing" as an acceptable answer. It took me like a whole minute to remember the alternative for pedestrian crossing
+1
level 34
Feb 26, 2014
British peeps are whack... they use "chips" for fries yet a whole new word for chips....
+1
level 45
Feb 27, 2014
Dare I bring up the Football/Soccer saga? Football (to give it its proper name) is nothing like American Football, which is more like Rugby!!
+1
level 33
Jul 9, 2016
That's because we have proper chips. Fries are those thin, pathetic little things. We have big fat ones. Mmmm.
+1
level 40
Oct 17, 2016
actually you use different words for them, your the one who was discovered by brits and had to make things different
+1
level 67
Feb 26, 2014
A little disappointed not to see cold on the cob or rooty tooty point and shooty on here.
+1
level 29
Feb 27, 2014
I'm english and I've never heard the word "ta" meaning thank you. I thought it was short for "ta-ta" as in the old word for goodbye. Must be a northern thing.
+1
level 10
Apr 5, 2015
"Tar" is used around Liverpool and that way
+1
level 51
Oct 17, 2016
Aye here in Grimsby too lad
+2
level 59
Nov 16, 2016
You must be very young. Ta has been common usage for ages.
+1
level 71
Feb 28, 2014
I've been a Californian my whole life and got 23. However, some of these crack me up and I'm going to start using them just for the reaction. Some of you from Britain should start using our "words" as well. Probably all get a decent laugh. I don't smoke, but if I did...
+1
level 40
Oct 17, 2016
You realise you changed our words, we didn't change yours
+1
level 58
Oct 27, 2016
We do use your words all the time - for example, ta is slang for thanks, not the English version.
+1
level 40
Mar 18, 2014
Never really understood how/why Americans can call a liquid a gas. :)
+4
level 75
Sep 30, 2014
It is short for gasoline, a word which originated in England. http://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2012/04/the-origin-of-gasoline/
+1
level 46
Nov 15, 2015
Technically it's a gas/vapour at the point of combustion in the engine. But yeah, I find it weird that they say gas when that could literally be any matter in gas form
+3
level 61
Mar 11, 2018
Petrol is short for Petroleum, the stuff that you distill gasoline or "gas" from. Petroleum is the raw material, gasoline is the finished product.
+1
level 46
Apr 14, 2014
You can't call all biscuits cookies! That's like calling all cakes muffins!
+1
level 24
Dec 20, 2016
So true!!
+1
level 72
Apr 10, 2019
But we call all biscuits... biscuits

I have wondered whether Americans have a specific word for what we call cookies though, anyone know?
+1
level 32
Apr 23, 2014
I'm british and i got 90 percent. just shows how american media is all over britain.
+1
level 22
Jun 1, 2014
You should include lectern which is podium in america
+1
level 24
Jan 20, 2019
No, it isn't. It's a common mistake in America. Even in America, the podium is the thing you stand on, the lectern is the thing you stand behind. But a lot of people just get it wrong.
+1
level 27
Jul 7, 2014
I've never heard the word "lectern" used before... Everyone says podium in england
+1
level 45
May 24, 2015
Lectern in church, podium elsewhere.
+1
level 35
Nov 27, 2015
That is just plainly false
+1
level 52
May 23, 2016
A lectern is the tall shelf you put your notes/book on. It often stands on a podium which is a small stage, or dais.
+2
level 58
Jun 9, 2017
Yes! Podium is for your feet, thus the "pod" in podium.
+1
level 27
Jul 7, 2014
People just watch a film where an old english guy says a word differently and assumes everyone says that
+1
level 27
Jul 7, 2014
assume*
+1
level 29
Jul 15, 2014
i guess its just me, but i thought apartment was spelled with two p's
+4
level 43
Sep 15, 2014
Yeah. Rest of us can spell.
+1
level 52
Oct 10, 2017
Yeah. Rest of us aren't pompous jerks.
+3
level 35
Aug 28, 2014
Hmm, barrister is not really equivalent to lawyer, it's equivalent to advocate. Barrister is not used in Scotland (under Scottish law there are advocates, not barristers). Barristers are peculiar to English and Welsh courts.
+1
level 75
Sep 30, 2014
In the US, attorneys perform that service as part of their profession. We have do not have the separate divisions as in the UK, so lawyer or attorney is correct.
+1
level 70
Sep 18, 2016
I thought that in England, lawyers were called solicitors. No?
+1
level 38
Nov 1, 2016
I have been taught that in the United Kingdom, attorneys are divided into two distinct roles: Solicitors are basically advocates who handle all pretrial matters, interviews, pre-trial discovery, all interrogatories and the solicitation of the trial attorney or Barrister. Again, I believe that this is peculiar to the United Kingdom.
+1
level 24
Dec 20, 2016
Hey DonTheLamplighter! Lawyers and solicitors are different things - lawyers are generally just people that study the law, such as a solicitor or barrister, and solicitors are more specifically people that deal with conveyancing and other legal matters such as wills. Hope this helped! ^.^
+1
level 63
Apr 2, 2017
Speaking as a Brit... lawyer is a general term for anyone having a qualification in law; barrister is a lawyer who represents you in a criminal court only; a solicitor is a more general lawyer who does non-court work (although nowadays there is some limited access for solicitors to lower level non-criminal courts). Given that the US does not have this division of labour, I always thought that the US word for all 3 British words was 'attorney'
+3
level 58
Jun 9, 2017
And in the USA, anyone can be an attorney; lawyers go to law school. "Attorney-at-law" is the lawyer. "Attorney" is just a representative. So when my mom wanted me to handle her financial matters, she assigned "Power of Attorney" to me. If you're going to lunch and I ask you to bring me back a ham sandwich, you're my Attorney-at-Lunch.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
Having a power of attorney for someone makes you an attorney-in-fact, not an attorney-at-law. You are not admitted to the bar and cannot practice law. Basically in the US, attorney and lawyer are the same thing.
+1
level 67
Dec 23, 2014
Anyone who hasn't heard all these words used is either very young or has not been around too much.
+5
level 35
Nov 29, 2016
Or has never been to England?
+6
level 70
Aug 14, 2017
Did it occur to you that there are hundreds of millions of native English speaking people who do not live in the UK?
+2
level 75
Feb 22, 2018
In Malbaby's defense (not that she's ever come to mine), I think she was probably speaking to the many British/English people commenting here who claim to have not heard one word or another.
+4
level 40
Dec 29, 2014
I got a bit confused at 'pissed' it means a few different things in south east England; angry, to go to the toilet or being drunk
+3
level 47
Mar 6, 2015
Haha you Brits have fag, which we find hilarious, and we have fanny pack, which I'm sure you find hilarious.
+1
level 35
Nov 27, 2015
Fag is just a slang term, there are far far more amusing words than that...
+1
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Oh I'm sure...lol
+3
level 14
Jul 27, 2017
yeah, we call them bum bags in the uk
+2
level 10
Apr 5, 2015
Not all Brits say "loo". Most people say toilet.
+1
level 67
Apr 30, 2015
Many Brits say 'Lav' for lavatory many on the other side of the pond say 'John'
+2
level 52
May 23, 2016
Most Brits say bog or loo (more polite).
+1
level 32
Feb 15, 2017
Little Boys Room shall reign supreme.
+3
level 56
Jun 7, 2017
We all know what "loo" means though - it's clearly a word used in Britain.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
Is water closet completely off the radar now?
+1
level 19
Apr 13, 2015
hmm..i know it mentions it in the quiz description, but some of the 'american' words in this quiz are used almost all the time here in England!
+2
level 58
Apr 14, 2015
I like the disclaimer "This quiz does NOT suggest that all British people use these words 100% of the time". The quiz master actually had to post that for fear of repercussion. Well, I am an American and I don't say the American words 100% of the time! Waaaaaaaaaaaaaa!!!!! G'day mates :D
+1
level 34
Feb 25, 2018
as a brit, i have never even heard the word 'zee'. we also call them bumpercarts not dodgems or at least anyone from Leicester does... i don't think the creator of this quiz knows EXACTLY what they're talking about. though we could start the war of what the proper name for a 'cob' is too...
+1
level 24
Jan 20, 2019
It's referring to the last letter of the alphabet. When we pronounce z, we say zee. You (and everyone else in the Englsh speaking world) say zed.
+3
level 59
Apr 20, 2015
Didn't take "letter Z" or just "Z" for Zed.
+2
level 29
May 24, 2016
Agreed. Who rights "zee?"
+1
level 24
Jan 20, 2019
Who writes zed? It's talking about pronunciation in either case.
+1
level 28
May 19, 2015
Didn't get the crossing, a lot of the American ones are just as commonly used in Britain though
+1
level 20
May 21, 2015
The word 'Pissed' has multiple meanings, it can mean 'Drunk' but we use 'Hammered' more often for that, it also means 'Annoyed' and 'Pee', for example 'I just had a piss' or 'I just pissed' means 'I just had a wee'. Pissed is also a swear word here in the UK.
+1
level 14
Jul 27, 2017
yeah like if you're irritated at someone you would be pissed at them
+1
level 46
May 24, 2015
Found myself sort of going 'what else could you call that?? Think like an American..hmm..' Also, 'Crosswalk'! What! :")
+1
level 51
Feb 13, 2018
Crosswalk had me stumped too
+1
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Yeah that's definitely the only thing they're called here in America. Never heard of "zebra crossing" until I took one of these quizzes but I think it's very cute :)
+1
level 54
Jun 23, 2015
I only knew "dodgems" because that is what the bumper cars are called in Roller Coaster Tycoon. Looked it up, and the developer is actually Scottish. I had absolutely no idea.
+1
level 11
Aug 25, 2015
pissed can also mean annoyed that's why I got it wrong
+2
level 30
Aug 15, 2017
"Pissed off" means annoyed. Pissed means drunk.
+1
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Interesting! To an American, pissed off and pissed mean exactly the same thing (really angry).
+1
level 26
Aug 26, 2015
Try saying "I have a stain on my pants" in London.
+2
level 50
Aug 26, 2015
I'm linguist, who has lived in the UK and US. Football is short for Association Football as opposed to Rugby Football. The word for somebody who play Rugby Football is a Rugger as opposed to an Association Football player who, in the late 19th century, was called a Soccer. That is how the word Soccer was created... in England. You could add: Take-Away = Take out/to-go Aubergine = Eggplant Cling film = Plastic wrap Court card = Face card Noughts and crosses = Tic-tac-toe Pram = Baby carriage/Stroller Recorded delivery = Certified mail Sleeping partner = Silent partner Stag night = Bachelor party Ticket tout = scalper Tights = Pantyhose Timber = Lumber Earth = Ground (electrical terms) Hob = Stovetop Hundreds and thousands = Sprinkles Jumper = Sweater Pinafore dress = Jumper Vest = Undershirt (tank top style) Verge = Shoulder (of a road) So many more are available, however, as TV and Movies cross the each way our languages becomes more common.
+1
level 70
Feb 28, 2016
There is a whole regional thing in the US around sprinkles vs. jimmies...
+1
level 35
Oct 29, 2016
eeew I don't your jimmies anywhere near anything of mine
+1
level 67
Apr 24, 2016
'I'm linguist' ......... should read I am a linguist. Your knowledge of Football / Soccer is abysmal, and your usage of 'Rugger' and 'Soccer' is even worse. My advice is stick with your own language, whatever that may be .... cos your English aint up to it.
+2
level 60
Aug 7, 2016
The linguist had some good ideas though. Despite imperfect grammar.
+1
level 14
Jul 27, 2017
Also pants/trousers
+1
level 14
Jul 27, 2017
and like saran wrap/cling film
+1
level 16
Oct 21, 2015
A lawyer in the UK is actually called a Solicitor, a barrister is just a type of Solicitor....
+2
level 68
Nov 27, 2018
No, they're different branches of the profession. They used to have very distinct roles but that has blurred in recent years. By and large a solicitor still works largely on either non contentious (wills, property, that sort of thing) or the preparation for trials. A barrister is more specialised and generally does the advocacy in court. I am a solicitor. I run each case and then instruct a barrister when it comes to court.
+1
level 38
Apr 18, 2019
Perhaps a more simple comparison between the English and American legal systems could be that in the US, the work done by an English Solicitor is often done by a Paralegal, whereas the equivalent of a Barrister is an Attorney-at-Law, or more commonly, a lawyer.
+1
level 36
Oct 28, 2015
Quite a few of them are wrong British people barely ever say chemist. All of the 'chemists' around Britain are called pharmacies. And we always say baked potato and bumper cars. only posh people call lines queues and we definitely do not say loo again only for posh people we quite often say truck and thanks and drunk we always say exit cigarette is quite often used and fag is mainly (now) another way of calling someone gay. so yeah. idk.
+3
level 59
Nov 7, 2015
Woah!! Back the truck and all that! Only posh people say queue???! Hell no! And anyone calling a gay person a fag needs a lesson in how to behave in the 21st century!!
+2
level 39
Jan 16, 2016
Agree with beccimoo. Where did you get the idea that only posh people use queue? We don't "always" say baked potato, we also say jacket. In the UK, lorries were always called that, but truck is now being used more - as, unfortunately, are so many Americanisms. The one I hate is people saying, "Can I get a coffee?", instead of "Can I have a coffee?". Ugh! Rant over.
+1
level 37
Apr 14, 2018
a coffee?
+2
level 33
Jul 9, 2016
I have never said baked potato. That question threw me. I could not understand what else a jacket potato could possibly be called.
+1
level 75
Nov 27, 2018
In my US kitchen we bake potatoes in the oven for baked potatoes, but if I boil unpeeled potatoes in a pan on the stove, they are called potatoes in their jackets.
+1
level 35
Oct 29, 2016
Sorry what part of the UK are you from.
+1
level 14
Jul 27, 2017
nah a lot of people where i live use chemist, jacket potato and dodgems, but i agree with you on the trucks a lot of people just use both
+2
level 31
Dec 15, 2017
Basically everything in this comment is wrong.
+2
level 39
Dec 15, 2017
Literally everything you just said is wrong. I am from yorkshire, i will give you some examples of how we speak: Giz a fag (can i please have a cigarette?) Am off tut chemists (I am going to the chemist's shop) Wheres bog? (Where is the toilet?) do us a jacket taitee (Please cook me a jacket potato) Ger in't queue (Join the queue) Just a few examples for you ;)
+2
level 63
Feb 22, 2018
I'm English and I certainly refer to them as chemists, not pharmacies. I don't know anybody who is actually English who would use "line" rather than "queue". There are lots of words for the toilet in England - loo is just one, but it is well known. The primary meaning of "fag" in England is still cigarette, though of course we know the American meaning. The quizmaster isn't saying that ALL English people use ONLY these words ALL the time. Some of these words are slang, and the "American" version is just the standard word, shared by both dialects, if there isn't an American slang equivalent.
+1
level 13
Nov 15, 2015
if you think it's hard, I, for one, am 12 years old, I'm from Sweden and we learn something not american but not english either
+2
level 45
Nov 29, 2015
Yay for reading a lot of British literature, got 22/27 without trying too hard (And we still use a bit of British English in Canada. Barrister confused me because of that, it's got an entirely different meaning to "lawyer" here). Ooh, add jumper! That one confused the heck out of me when I was a kid reading Harry Potter for the first time...
+1
level 50
Jan 4, 2016
Can't you accept running shoes for trainers?
+2
level 45
Feb 15, 2016
Wait, Americans don't say queue or "way out"?
+2
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Well, now that Netflix is a thing, we do say queue, but only in that context. A queue is always a line (although I actually like queue because it distinguishes between people waiting their turn and people simply lining up, e.g. for inspection or something). And yeah, Americans say "way out" as in "I'm looking for a way out of here." But the signs pointing you out of buildings, planes, etc. all say exit, and we call them exits. We never end the sentence with "way out" when that's what we're talking about.
+1
level 40
Apr 16, 2018
Exit and Way out are used very commonly in both nations, so it's not exclusive to either
+2
level 75
Nov 28, 2018
I have never heard someone ask for the "way out".
+1
level 71
Feb 28, 2016
I would like to heartily thank Sherlock for having introduced me to the British terms Ta, Loo, Trainers, Crips/Chips, queue and pissed :).
+3
level 70
Feb 28, 2016
I'm surprised no one's brought up the whole erasers -> rubbers -> condoms quagmire. I remember some very EMBARRASSED British exchange students back in the day.
+2
level 48
Mar 4, 2016
Not bad. Can I suggest editing "Flat" to "Flat (noun)"? I thought at first it was "Flat (adjective)" – as in "a flat tyre". (BTW, that's British for "a flat tire". ;-))
+1
level 45
Mar 7, 2016
pissed can also mean angry/mad as in "I am so pissed with you"
+1
level 63
Feb 22, 2018
For most English people, "pissed" means drunk and "Pissed off" means angry.
+1
level 35
May 8, 2016
Many of these are just synonyms, Apartment, Bathroom, Lawyer, Complain, Thanks, Drunk, Cigarette, Exit and Bumper Cars are all regularly used and are not Americanisms, rather its simply that he other option is specifically English, and in England are completely interchangeable.
+1
level 17
May 28, 2016
why is the first floor called the second floor?
+1
level 52
Aug 21, 2016
Americans don't have a ground floor. They call it the first floor.
+2
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
Well, we do say ground floor fairly often, but even then the floor above that one is always the second floor
+1
level 25
Jul 3, 2016
Paraffin/Kerosene. My best buddies.
+1
level 54
Jul 19, 2016
Accept the singulars for sneakers and bumper cars? Also pissed vs drunk and fag vs cigarette seem too different to be equated, even if their denotation is the same.
+1
level 44
Jul 26, 2016
That's hard as Australians use both English and American
+1
level 60
Aug 24, 2018
And a lot of nonsense
+1
level 27
Aug 22, 2016
Quite a few of these are just slang words and the answers are still British words, just not slang. For example 'Ta' is a regional version of 'thanks', but most Brits still use 'thanks'. It's not an American word.
+2
level 70
Sep 18, 2016
Think of how simple things would be if we all just communicated via semaphore.
+2
level 62
Oct 16, 2016
way out vs. exit is the worst example of British vs. American words you could possibly think of. All 'ways out' here in England are labelled 'Exit'.
+3
level ∞
Oct 16, 2016
https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Way_out.jpg
+1
level 35
Oct 29, 2016
Way out is rare and I assume getting rarer, and summons other meanings before exit.
+1
level 20
Nov 12, 2016
I'm a Singaporean and we use a mix so it's hard.
+2
level 24
Dec 20, 2016
I'm British and GOD translating some of these words into American was hard!!! Btw, translating 'fag' as cigarette isn't really correct, as fag is slang and not commonly used; I've ever said it in my life! Also biscuits and cookies are different, we have cookies here as well as biscuits, but I get that Americans don't have that. Great Quiz! ^.^
+2
level 66
Dec 21, 2016
In America, cookies and biscuits are very different. Cookies are flat and very sweet - a dessert-type food. Biscuits are a buttery non-sweet pastry that is eaten with breakfast. I don't know what British people call American breakfast biscuits.
+1
level 28
Apr 18, 2019
The closest we have in the UK for the American 'biscuit' (the buttery non-sweet pastry served with breakfast) is a scone, or perhaps a very thick muffin. Here's a pic of what Americans & Brits call a biscuit... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biscuit#/media/File:BiscuitsAmerican%26British.png I'm curious, in the US are 'cookies' always the things that are round, flat, and the texture deliciously chewy? Or are they sometimes other shapes – square, rectangular, triangular etc, and the texture sometimes hard and brittle?
+1
level 46
Jan 14, 2017
In Britain we use these as often as you do - Baked Potato, exit, lawyer, complain (the real word for whinge) pharmacy, truck, cigarette (the real word for fag) apartment, bathroom and so on. Most of these are just slang words and should not be included in this list. The ones that should be in the list as they are not normally used with your meaning are: crisps, queue, petrol, zed, pissed, trainers, biscuit, bonnet, nappy, full stop, silencer, first floor. zebra crossing.
+1
level 39
Jun 18, 2017
Yup.
+1
level 71
May 26, 2017
"Chemist" is the person (pharmacist). ""Chemist's" is a pharmacy.
+1
level 61
Feb 22, 2018
That's how I thought of it, too. I tried "druggist" and "pharmacist" before I thought of the physical store and typed "drugstore."
+2
level 35
Jun 10, 2017
Huh. I was surprised not to see pavement - sidewalk as part of the quiz.
+1
level 67
Jun 30, 2017
No one I know spells the letter Z any way but Z. And a crosswalk is also known as a pedestrian crossing. Other than that = fun.
+1
level 71
Jul 11, 2017
Gobsmacked that so many believe pissed also means pissed off ;)
+1
level 23
Jul 26, 2017
Lol I am South African so we speak British English and American English
+1
level 13
Aug 3, 2017
noooo I got 23 xD so close
+1
level 13
Aug 3, 2017
there also the gherkin -> pickle one
+1
level 45
Oct 16, 2017
So is the UK first floor not the ground floor?
+1
level 49
Nov 26, 2017
The ground floor is called the ground floor, then the first floor above that is called the FIRST FLOOR.
+2
level 24
Nov 12, 2017
Couldn't for the life of me figure out what Americans call a zebra crossing.
+1
level 43
Nov 18, 2017
pissed is annoyed not drunk..
+2
level 58
Mar 3, 2018
Pissed off is annoyed and pissed is drunk. Both vulgar though and classed as slang.
+1
level 49
Nov 26, 2017
Everyone knows that Americans DON'T call it a pharmacy - they call it a drug store.
+2
level 47
Feb 22, 2018
We say both
+1
level 46
Nov 27, 2018
I've always said pharmacy. Drug store, to me is what senior citizens say.
+1
level 39
Dec 15, 2017
A lot of these words are just slang. I will point out as well that if the context is understood you can add 'ed' to the end of just about any word and people will know that you mean drunk, around where I am from for example you get 'blastered' on a night out.
+2
level 29
Dec 22, 2017
should accept pedestrian crossing
+1
level 19
Jan 23, 2018
In London, the word fag is used a lot less than cigarette, lawyer a lot more than barrister, exit as much as way out, and there's only one person I have ever heard say ta, who is Japanese, not English. But overall, great quiz.
+1
level 32
Feb 22, 2018
A Barrister is a form of lawyer that has the right to represent a client in certain types of court. US Lawyers are more like solicitors and when representing client in court Council.
+2
level 75
Feb 22, 2018
"Dodgems" vs "Bumper cars" suggests that British people are much more passive when they enjoy this carnival attraction.
+1
level 68
Nov 27, 2018
I think you may be overlooking the British sense of irony (or sarcasm, depending on your viewpoint). See for example Little John...
+1
level 58
Mar 3, 2018
Good quiz but as others have said, many of these are slang. Pissed for example means drunk but it is vulgar language and I would not use it in general company. Drunk is the British word too. Ta is the same - it is often said but it is slang and not every British person says it. However, we do all call biscuits biscuits and chips chips and crisps crisps.
+1
level 40
Apr 16, 2018
"Pissed" means someone can also be angry so it's a bit confusing
+1
level 70
Nov 27, 2018
I know what you mean, but it would be more likely to be 'pissed off' rather than just 'pissed'. Context, etc...
+1
level 24
Apr 25, 2018
chips and fries are different things, aren't they? chips are the thick proper ones and fries are the really skinny american ones like you get in macdonalds
+1
level 35
Jun 8, 2018
1. you spelt british wrong. 2. Cigarette, exit, lawyer and thanks originated from the UK. 3. Barristers are a type of lawyer. copied this from JVIR
+1
level 56
Jun 29, 2018
British is actually correctly spelt with a capital 'B'.
+2
level 58
Jun 19, 2018
Quite a lot of these are UK slang - drunk is drunk; pissed is a slang term used by some of us, but not all. Lawyer in UK is anyone who practices law - a barrister is just one kind of lawyer.
+1
level 36
Aug 11, 2018
WHY IS TA HERE WE DON'T USE TA WE SAY THANKS.
+2
level 76
Aug 24, 2018
Have you ever met someone from the Midlands?
+2
level 59
Aug 24, 2018
Head up north, manchester, liverpool, north Wales way and you'll hear ta.
+2
level 56
Nov 27, 2018
Really? Do you not listen to your fellow country people? Ta is heard all over (I'm in the south and I hear it often enough, and say it enough).
+1
level 31
Oct 2, 2018
Never heard of Crosswalk, so 26/27
+1
level 37
Oct 22, 2018
My only experience with hearing "high street" are English makeup youtubers talking about cheaper make-up, such as you would find in an American drugstore. So I thought it meant that...but drugstore (pharmacy) was the answer for something else.
+1
level 32
Oct 29, 2018
Funny how being British means we use some of both, if your parents say chips for dinner, you don't think twice, you go to get fish and chips from the fish and chip shop. However nobody goes to McDonalds and says Chips please, they ask for fries. We also say Bathroom (more than we say Loo, though I assume it depends where in the UK you come from) Lorry and truck are both used as much as each other and most don't really have one they always use. Whinge is more of a moan, complain can be used in the same place but not really. Some people say gas but nobody says gas station. We say Ta and Thanks a lot. Polite people say Drunk, not the other. Same with cigarette, no polite person says 'fag'. Some brands are cookies and some are biscuits, nobody says Digestive Cookie. We say pharmacy as well. And to be honest I think most people say Bumper Cars not Dodgems. In conclusion, you Americans are all wrong! But I love you none the less!
+1
level 55
Apr 18, 2019
Fries and chips aren't the same thing. Chip shop style chips are big fat things. Fries are thin things from Belgium, as in french fries, or steak-frites. Same with lorry and truck I'd say. Lorries are the huge things that do 60mph in the middle lane on motorways. If someone said truck I'd assume they mean a pickup truck or similar. And I'd say toilet or loo is used way more than bathroom. I've never heard someone in a pub ask where the bathroom is, or say they're going to the bathroom. Maybe that's the company I keep though :)
+1
level 23
Nov 27, 2018
POSSIBLE WORD COMBINATIONS FOR SHREK Shrek Sherk Shkre Srehk I gave up now.
+1
level 58
Nov 27, 2018
When did the spelling of cooky become cookie? I still have my Betty Crocker Cooky Cook Book. The early spelling should also be accepted. Also, as a child in Miami in the early 50s, "Funland" had a "Dodgems" ride. Wasn't until I was an adult I heard them referred to as bumper cars.
+1
level 52
Nov 27, 2018
In Britain fries and chips are two different things. Chips are proper bits (chips) of potato, deep fried to crispy wholesome loveliness, then smothered in vinegar and eaten with fish, or if you're feeling flush - steak. However fries are those horrible thin over salted things that you get in McDonalds, and always feel a little bit worse about yourself after you've eaten them.
+1
level 39
Nov 27, 2018
I wonder if there are any American slang words that don't exist in the UK?
+1
level 46
Nov 27, 2018
Really need to accept Main St for Main Street
+1
level 41
Nov 28, 2018
Brit here - never heard the term 'silencer' before with regards to a car. We say muffler too
+1
level 60
Nov 30, 2018
One word used in Britain, but never in U.S. - PLEASE.
+1
level 47
Dec 7, 2018
kept thinking about flat as in, not raised... (funilly a flat is..) pretty sure i did type baked potato but apparently wrote patato... which I often mistakenly do.. Somehow trolley made me type lorry, em sorry, otherway around. I thought it was a cart you could move like heavy stuff with..
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