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Christmas Trivia #2

Answer these random Christmas trivia questions.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedDecember 11, 2012
Last updatedJuly 31, 2016
Times taken37,993
Rating3.64
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Question
Answer
In Britain, what is the name for the day after Christmas?
Boxing Day
What plant is used to deck the halls?
Holly
Besides a star, what decoration is commonly placed atop a Christmas tree?
Angel
What is "Stille Nacht" in English?
Silent Night
In 1996, which toy was so popular that it was virtually unattainable in stores?
Tickle Me Elmo
What is the politically correct way to say "Merry Christmas"?
Happy Holidays
What kind of pipe did Frosty the Snowman have?
Corncob
Who nips at your nose?
Jack Frost
In which country did the tradition of the Christmas tree start?
Germany
Which Christmas character was created by the Montgomery Ward department store?
Rudolph the
Red-Nosed Reindeer
Who is the French version of Santa Claus?
Père Noël
Which warm, spiced wine is served at Christmastime?
Mulled Wine
Which Christmas music group has a German city as part of its name?
Mannheim Steamroller
In addition to gold and myrrh, which gift was given by the three wise men?
Frankincense
Santa's belly jiggles like a bowl full of what?
Jelly
Who wanted to kill the baby Jesus?
King Herod
Who was Jesus's earthly father?
Joseph
In U.S. retail, what is the nickname for the day after Thanksgiving?
Black Friday
What Christmas movie stars Will Ferrell?
Elf
What custardy drink is a traditional Christmas beverage?
Eggnog
+2
level 20
Dec 11, 2012
I sometimes wonder the origin of the word "Boxing day". It just reminds me of boxing kangaroos o.o!
+1
level 44
Dec 11, 2012
I think it's more along the lines of boxed gifts, but I could be way off
+2
level 29
Dec 11, 2012
I always thought it was because that was the day you "boxed up" all the Christmas decorations, but most people seem to leave their stuff up until February most of the time.
+1
level 38
Sep 4, 2015
+1 You are correct
+1
level 62
Dec 11, 2016
I doubt it. The traditional day to take down Christmas decorations is the 12th day of Christmas, 6 January.
+3
level 76
Dec 11, 2012
It's the day they give gifts to people they do business with ... like the milkman, the mailman and so on.
+3
level 67
Nov 23, 2015
It comes from the tradition of giving presents to the staff of the house (not just leftovers) in boxes (parcels)
+3
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
you could be boxing your relatives after all the things they said at the dinner table the night before.
+1
level 73
Oct 26, 2018
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boxing_Day
+2
level 30
Oct 28, 2018
The origin lies in the servants of nobles during the Victorian era. Since they had to work and serve on Christmas Day, they were given the day after off to celebrate with their own families. They were given a box from their employer to share with their family.
+1
level 63
Dec 11, 2012
Oh man, I wrote "King Herrod," with two Rs. I'm totally giving myself credit for that one! :)
+1
level ∞
Oct 6, 2014
Herrod will work now.
+1
level 58
Dec 11, 2012
There needs to be a grave accent on the first e of 'père'
+1
level ∞
Oct 6, 2014
Fixed
+1
level 32
Dec 11, 2012
Boxing day is basically where people would box presents or food and give it to the local church
+1
level 56
Dec 12, 2012
As in if somebody actually cared about "politically correct".
+1
level 67
Dec 11, 2016
That's funny - and here I thought it was an acknowledgment that not everyone celebrated Christmas.
+1
level 57
Oct 1, 2018
It wasn't originally, and if it is now then it isn't really any more inclusive than "Merry Christmas" - not everybody has a holiday around then either.
+1
level 58
Jan 27, 2019
TWM03 well it is more inclusive than Merry Christmas because Merry Christmas applies only to Christians, whereas Happy Holidays applies to everybody with a holiday around this time- and most people at least have holiday from work or school if not a religious holiday. It is not totally inclusive, no, but to say it "isn't really any more" inclusive is just ridiculous
+1
level 53
Dec 12, 2012
After seeing the name of the day after thanksgiving this may be a silly question but- Is thanksgiving always a Thursday, if so what is the reason?
+1
level 83
Dec 12, 2012
Yes, Thanksgiving is always on the 4th Thursday of November. Why? There is some suspected history (see [http://www.equiculture.org/why-is-thanksgiving-on-thursday-.aspx], for example), but most of the reasoning you'll find is speculative at best. The most accurate reason is: because Congress said so.
+1
level 58
Dec 11, 2014
Technically not true. Only American Thanksgiving is celebrated on the 4th Thursday of November. Canadian Thanksgiving is the 2nd Monday of October (it came first BTW).
+1
level 28
Dec 11, 2014
@Symmetrik why is there even a Canadian Thanksgiving? The first Thanksgiving was celebrated between the pilgrims and Native Amricans in America.
+1
level 58
Dec 11, 2014
The first evidence of Thanksgiving in Canada was In 1578, when a group of Artic explorers ran into freak storm and bad snow. They escaped relatively unscathed, and gave thanks for the strange fortunes that came to them in their survival. The next evidence was 1604, when French settlers following Samuel de Champlain, gave thanks with a huge feast after crossing the ocean.
+1
level ∞
Dec 11, 2014
Added U.S. to the question.
+1
level 18
Dec 12, 2012
Argh, I THOUGHT of Boxing Day but I thought it was in November for some reason! And Pere Noel... I couldn't remember the second part... I kept on saying Pere Christmas... Lol
+1
level 20
Apr 29, 2013
If this is CHRISMAS TRIVIA, why is there THANKSGIVING on this quiz????
+1
level 73
Aug 9, 2013
Because for some unGodly reason, Christmas starts the day after Thanksgiving. I friggin hate it.
+1
level 82
May 22, 2014
So the rest of us that don't have Thanksgiving don't get Christmas either?
+1
level ∞
Oct 6, 2014
I wish @buck1017. Lately Christmas has started the day after HALLOWEEN.
+1
level 50
Oct 12, 2014
There is actually a song about that. Christmas Can-Can. Heard this same song twenty times and it's only Halloween. It's not even cold outside. Christmas season, starting sooner every year. It's October, stores have plastic Christmas trees... etc. It's pretty darn funny. Sincerely recommend a listen.
+1
level 76
Sep 28, 2015
You think you get it bad - in the UK it tends to start somewhere round the end of August. Or the shops think so anyway.
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
Though the all-consuming Christmas season continues to resorb more and more of the end of the calendar year... "Black Friday" has long been and I think still is considered the start of the Christmas *shopping* season, if not the season in general. It's when the sales start. It's when retailers can count of having their ledgers be "in the black" as many US retail chains make most of their profits this time of year.

Anyway, though the hint mentions Thanksgiving, the answer- Black Friday- is definitely about Christmas.
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2014
Christmas is the Borg of holidays. It grows larger and larger, consuming and assimilating all adjacent holidays until the entire year is one long onslaught of holiday music and consumerism. Resistance is Futile.

and, oh yeah, Christmas is under attack. Right...
+1
level 67
Dec 19, 2014
Does that make Halloween the Tertiary Adjunct of Unimatrix Zero-One (with Christmas as 01)? So sorry everybody....
+2
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
Nobody is attacking the meaning of Christmas, either. Didn't you see Kirk Cameron's magnum opus Saving Christmas? It won a lot of awards. Razzies mostly. In it he explains how pagan polytheist traditions, shmaltzy holiday kitsch, and rampant crass consumerism are all really about Jesus.

More seriously, I've been hearing about people forgetting Christmas was about Christ since I was 5. That was 32 years ago. Nobody has forgotten yet.
+1
level 73
May 3, 2019
In a way it's like the anti-Borg - as the Borg assimilate more individuals the knowledge and experience that the hive mind shares grows greater and greater. Christmas, like you say, just turns a larger and larger portion of each passing year into a mass of dumbed-down homogeneity, so much so that for about 2 months of the year now there will be absolutely no good music on in my mum's house - just the same 20 god-awful 'Christmas' songs on a loop - and all of the shops on the high street hang the same tacky lumps of garish plastic in their windows.

I wish Christmas would go back to being 2 days, then it was special.

And I really wish I was Borg *sigh*
+1
level 77
Apr 3, 2014
I think I said this before. Maybe the comments were deleted. But there is nothing politically correct about saying "Happy Holidays" - a greeting that was perfectly accepted by Christians up until the invented "War on Christmas" came along and convinced people that this was somehow anti-Christmas. The question belongs as much on an April Fool's Quiz as the X-Mas question on this quiz
+3
level 67
Dec 11, 2014
That is completely correct. A couple of years ago I went to a museum to see an exhibition of '50s & '60s Christmas cards, & lo & behold, at least half of them said either Happy Holidays or Season's Greetings. Those decades were long before the (completely phony) "War on Christmas." Greeting someone w/a kind word or three ought to be about making the other person feel good, not about metaphorically patting oneself on the back about how pious oneself is.
+1
level 36
Dec 11, 2014
Exactly.
+2
level 76
Dec 11, 2014
Thank you, Kalbahamut. I also grew up with Season's Greetings and Happy Holidays on cards and in store windows and we never thought anyone was using them to negate the "reason for the season". (Doesn't the word holiday come from holy day, anyway?) I prefer using those types of greetings in order to include people who celebrate other holidays during the same time, and it really irks me that some people have decided that means I'm un-Christian.
+2
level 70
Dec 25, 2014
I understood it was meant to include New Year's greetings.
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
"Happy Holidays" has come to be a term that is meant to be inclusive (oh, the horror! Inclusiveness!!)... buuut... originally it WAS just intended as a shorter was of saying "Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year." Later on people came to think that it also meant Happy Hannukah. And then eventually Kwanzaa got thrown in. I think it was around that time that people started getting angry. But these greetings have been in use, by Christians and non-Christians alike, for decades (Merry Xmas dates back to the 16th century!), without offending anyone.
+1
level 67
Apr 23, 2014
Can "incense" be accepted?
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2014
or Frankensteinsense?
+1
level 16
Dec 15, 2016
Frankenstein incense? Its just frankincense
+1
level 77
Mar 28, 2019
Maybe that guy was joking.
+1
level 10
Sep 23, 2014
There should be a quiz on "the holiday for the rest of us, Festivus" * Seinfeld quote*
+1
level 45
Sep 23, 2014
Excellent idea! Get out the old Festivus Pole and then we'll do the "feats of strength"........
+1
level 76
Dec 14, 2016
Here you go! http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/106973/festivus-quiz
+1
level 64
Dec 11, 2014
That's only the politically correct version in the States. In other areas of the world "Happy Festive Season" is politically correct, and should also be accepted. I am sure there are loads of other "politically Correct" sayings all over the world.
+1
level 70
Dec 11, 2014
"In 1996, which toy was so popular that it was virtually unattainable in stores?" The Turbo-Man, of course!
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2014
I think Rammstein is more festive and Christmas-y than Mannheim Steamroller. They have that song about angels. And another about a piano. A bunch about sodomy.
+1
level 46
Dec 11, 2014
Pretty sure Seasons' Greetings is as politically correct as Happy Holidays........
+1
level ∞
Dec 11, 2014
That will work now too.
+1
level 39
Dec 13, 2014
I tried egg flip, as that is what it is commonly called in the UK. Can you please also accept that as an answer as well?
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
Technically these days to be PC you must get affirmative consent before wishing someone happy holidays. And if you are a man, "white," able-bodied, "cis"gendered, etc, it would also be wise to apologize profusely for your privilege before addressing a woman or person of color, or, really, anybody. Better to just keep your mouth shut. Who are you to oppress these people by insisting that they have a good day? What's next? Are you going to tell them to smile? Or compliment some part of their appearance? ugh! And "seasons greetings!?" Oh my god. Why are you greeting strange people you don't know. That's sexual harassment, obviously. You might as well be raping them.
+1
level 38
Dec 11, 2017
Kalbahamut: I seldom agree with you, but you have definitely hit the nail on the head in your 12/11/2016 comment. (Wow! it took me exactly one year to find it!) This overabundance of being politically correct is not only smothering all creativity but, if continued unabated, will soon reduce us to automatons.
+1
level 58
Jan 27, 2019
Transgender and cisgender are adjectives, not verbs. Cis is also an established and widely used prefix to mean "the same", or more specifically "on the same side". You would most likely recognise the prefixes cis and trans from the terms cisfats and transfats, where cisfats have the h atoms on the same side of the molecule and the transfats have them on opposite sides. Therefore cisgender means same gender i.e. your real gender is the same as the gender assigned to at birth It's not a slur or randomly created term so no need for those " "
+1
level 77
Mar 28, 2019
First, these kooks use "gender" as a verb all the time. Maybe you missed the last meeting.

2nd, of course this ridiculous term was invented with a political agenda in mind. It can and has been used regularly as a pejorative, by those who also use "white", "male", and "privileged" as pejoratives (and there are many out there, I've had these insults hurled at me many times). But the original purpose was not so much to put down normal people but rather to take away and deny their normal status. Because while it should make perfect sense to refer to those who were born biologically male as simply "male" and those who were born biologically female as simply "female," if you exclusively attach prefixes to transsexuals then this is acknowledging that there is something unusual or different about their gender identity, and we can't have that, so they want to force unnecessary prefixes on everyone. At the same time calling people "cis-male" or "cis-female" pushes the narrative that ...
+1
level 77
Mar 28, 2019
... gender is fluid or a social construct and that there is some need to identify if someone is the same gender they were born as. This is sort of like calling someone a human-person, or Siamese-Thai. It's redundant, unnecessary, and politically charged.

The way quotes work in this context is that you are quoting someone else- using someone else's words that are not your own words. These are not my own words. In some cases you may borrow someone else's words that you might also use yourself, but you want to use a proper attribution. But not in this case. I would never in my life refer to someone as "cis"gender un-ironically. I also don't recognize race as a real thing, so "white" is similarly appropriate. It's shorthand for saying something like "so-called white people" to acknowledge that while the label is invalid or just not something I would use myself, nevertheless there are people who use that label. My use of quotes was completely justified.
+1
level 67
Dec 11, 2014
Glogg for mulled wine?
+1
level 26
Dec 17, 2014
gold, gingerbread ostrich, and myrrh.
+1
level 59
Dec 3, 2016
'Happy Holidays' is simply an Americanism, not necessarily politically correct
+1
level 47
Dec 11, 2016
In every other quiz on this site Jell-O is the answer. Tried that here and moved on.
+1
level 70
Dec 11, 2016
Have you read the poem? It's always been "Jelly" and never "Jell-O"--that wouldn't rhyme.
+1
level 76
Dec 11, 2016
Plus, "A Visit from St. Nicholas" (aka 'Twas the Night Before Christmas') was published in 1823, and Jell-O wasn't invented until 1897.
+1
level 43
Dec 11, 2016
Hm... Title of the quiz: Christmas Trivia #2. Date published on the site: 31st July??????
+1
level 50
Dec 11, 2016
Can someone please explain the 'Santa's belly jiggles like..' question? The poem says 'and a little round belly That shook when he laugh’d, like a bowl full of jelly' - doesn't it? '
+1
level 50
Dec 11, 2016
Also - I tried St Nicholas for the French Santa - no??
+1
level 76
Dec 11, 2016
There weren't three wise men! An unknown number of "Magi from the east" (Matthew 2:1) brought gifts made of three materials (Matthew 2:11), thus everyone assumes there were three gifts; one wise man per gift. Also, "Happy Holidays" isn't the politically correct way to say Merry Christmas; it's the inclusive way to wish people happiness during whatever holiday they celebrate. "Merry Christmas" is the politically correct way to say Merry Christmas.
+1
level 37
Dec 11, 2016
Another great Christmas Quiz. Thanks :) I enjoyed it very much! I remember the great struggle to find the Tickle Me Elmo. It was crazy.
+1
level 63
Dec 11, 2016
Almost didn't get frankincense as I kept just writing frank. That's how I learnt it. Oopsie.
+1
level 38
Dec 11, 2016
70% first try. Aren't jelly and jello the same thing?
+1
level 77
Dec 11, 2016
peanut butter and jell-o sandwiches?
+1
level 58
Jan 27, 2019
Isn't jello a brand of American pudding? I had american neighbours and they always used to make "jello pies" with us, and that was like a chocolate cream sort of thing. Jelly is, well, jelly. It wobbles
+1
level 60
Dec 11, 2016
I could be wrong, but I thought all , (or at least most) commonwealth countries celebrate Boxing Day
+1
level 45
Nov 28, 2017
we have black Friday in UK as well now is the christmas toy thing in America coz I remember in 1996 the stores being totally sold out of buzz lightyears as it was the ust have toy in UK
+1
level 35
Nov 12, 2018
I see you accept Gluhwein, but maybe accept it with some kinder spellings for people in the odd situation I am that they know of it as Gluhwein and not mulled wine, but can't spell German words (maybe something along the lines of gluewine or gluevine as that's how it is pronounced)
+1
level 58
Jan 27, 2019
I didn't realise thanksgiving was related to christmas- I always thought it was in november and was to do with american settlers. As a brit thanksgiving is a bit of a mystery to me, I genuinely had no idea it was anything to do with christmas!
+1
level 73
Jan 31, 2019
Also a Brit and also not sure but I think it's something to do with native Americans sharing their food with the pilgrims who had a shortage. I don't think it is related to Christmas per se but rather as it is a holiday and it's in the run-up to Christmas I think the stores started trying to cash in by offering big discounts at a time when people had time get to the shops.

I could be totally wrong about all of that. I suppose we could ask Google couldn't we?!
+1
level 77
Mar 28, 2019
I explained this above. The question isn't about Thanksgiving, it's about Black Friday, which is the Friday after Thanksgiving and in the US traditionally marks the beginning of the Christmas shopping season.
+1
level 65
May 12, 2019
Is Noel considered the last name of French Santa? If so, I tried just putting that, but got no credit.
+1
level 73
Sep 30, 2019
Please accept papa noel for the French version of Santa Claus