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Commonly Misspelled Words Quiz #2

These words are misspelled. See if you can guess the correct spellings.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: May 27, 2014
First submittedAugust 9, 2011
Times taken47,084
Rating4.25
4:00
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 / 27 guessed
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Incorrect
Correct
Seperate
Separate
Vaccum
Vacuum
Liason
Liaison
Anull
Annul
Rasberry
Raspberry
Pyscho
Psycho
Shepard
Shepherd
Sargent
Sergeant
Pharoh
Pharaoh
Incorrect
Correct
Reknown
Renown
Marshmellow
Marshmallow
Accomodate
Accommodate
Apartide
Apartheid
Resteraunt
Restaurant
Limosine
Limousine
Innoculate
Inoculate
Minature
Miniature
Seige
Siege
Incorrect
Correct
Twelth
Twelfth
Lambast
Lambaste
Accidently
Accidentally
Vinigarette
Vinaigrette
Catapiller
Caterpillar
Maintainence
Maintenance
Dumbell
Dumbbell
Gaurentee
Guarantee
Supercede
Supersede
+1
level 36
Sep 30, 2011
why would anyone write marshmellow or pyscho, they don't even sound like that.
+1
level 71
Nov 24, 2012
It depends. When you listen to the Beatles' version of "Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds," http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDl0qPfkSRw at 1:15, it sounds more like marshmellow. On the other hand, Elton John, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zWSJQvFTg4&feature=related at 2:10, pronounces it distinctly as marshmallow. Without claiming any expertise, I wouldn't be surprised if this difference was one that divided Liverpudlians such as Lennon from Middlesex natives such as John,
+2
level 71
Jan 2, 2013
And long ago, when I was much too young to see it, I told my parents I wanted to go see "Psycho," which I pronounced "pishco."
+1
level 67
Aug 6, 2014
I definitely pronounce marshmallow as "marshmellow," and I always hear it that way too. It could be an accent thing.
+1
level 77
Aug 17, 2014
Marshmeller? That sounds as odd as that guy Barack Obamer they're always talking about on the BBC. And Chiner... Cuber... Russier... and some other mysterious places.
+3
level 62
Oct 7, 2015
kalbahamut, You're obviously hearing the accent very oddly, because that's not how we pronounce them. Quite the reverse. We don't pronounce an "R" at the end of a word, like doctor. So to you it'd be "doctah".
+2
level 46
Mar 29, 2016
It's pronounced marshmellow where I'm from too.
+1
level 76
Apr 15, 2017
Once again I accidentally hit delete when I thought I was replying. My original comment stated that we also pronounce it as marshmellow, and heaven forbid, occasionally as marshmeller. That prompted Kalbahamut's reply. I was trying to say that I also hear the Brit's add r's to the ends of some words such as Chiner and Cuber. I used to chuckle when Gordon Ramsay would tell a contestant, "That chicken is not cooked! It's rawr!" But I also hear those r's added to some US accents - maybe the Northeast?
+1
level 73
Apr 17, 2017
It's called a rhotic accent/dialect. You get it in SW England, Ireland, etc. so not surprising it made it to parts of the Northeastern USA ... and saying "marshmellow" is just plain wrong
+1
level 74
Apr 18, 2017
hm I think rhotic acent is pronunciation of actual Rs, like in first, father etc. Not adding extra Rs.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
yup to me they sound exactly the same.
+1
level 35
Feb 24, 2012
can spell the words, just not enough time to answer them all
+1
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
me too...i cannot type.. i have to hunt-and-peck....not recommended in a timed quiz
+1
level 22
Jul 9, 2012
Glad to see accommodate was accommodated. Some of the misspellings were so weird I could hardly recognise what they were meant to be - but I really enjoyed the game. Thanks!!
+1
level 62
Nov 23, 2012
Pyscho? That's so far from right and I never read it like that anywhere. XD
+1
level 58
Mar 5, 2017
The correct spelling is "psycho" so it's only the s and y switched around. Hardly that far off
+1
level 58
Mar 5, 2014
I don't think I've ever heard the words Annul or Lambaste, so I had no idea about those. I couldn't figure out who word Midevil was trying to get - it didn't sound at all like Medieval, so I didn't make the connection. I just missed Liaison and Vinaigrette.
+1
level 44
Nov 21, 2014
i've definitely heard annul (as in, people get an annulment on their marriage) but i've never heard lambaste either
+1
level 76
Apr 15, 2017
"The politician lambasted the reporter's remarks that he had stolen money from his campaign funds." I've heard people say lamblasted instead, but I didn't realize it had an e on the end until I took the quiz today. At least that was easy to guess.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
hadnt heard of lambaste either, reminds me of alabaster..
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
I looked up the word lambast, without the e is the correct spelling in Uk-english. So maybe not the best clue? (now they might start to write it the wrong way for them haha)
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
medieval is not on the quiz anymore. But I think it definitely is one that most people whose first language is not english would misspell (and maybe for native english speakers aswell. And it definitely does sound like mid-evil ...
+1
level 34
Jun 5, 2014
I kept spelling the word the exact same way it was misspelled even though I know how to spell it, this quiz is definitely harder than it looks but I really enjoyed the challenge~
+1
level 75
Aug 6, 2014
When I saw anull I tried anal. oops.
+1
level 64
Aug 6, 2014
"Phrasing!" -Sterling Mallory Archer
+1
level 31
Aug 6, 2014
Being a non-native english speaker, and learning by hearing AND reading seems to have its advantages - 27/27 at first try :).
+1
level 72
Aug 6, 2014
When does word spelling that evolves over time change a "wrong" spelling into an accepted one? "Shop" was wrong for decades when it was supposed to be spelt "shoppe". Has "lambast" already become a new spelling?
+1
level 76
Aug 7, 2014
This is an interesting article on language reform: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English-language_spelling_reform. This article tells how Merriam-Webster decides on which new words to add to their dictionary. http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/faq/words_in.htm It appears that the correct spelling and pronunciation depends on which expert or dictionary you consult as there is no definitive authority.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
Nowadays words are a lot more written down, so you can more easily say a word is spelled wrong. Centuries ago most people couldnt read or right, so it got spelled different everytime, and language evolved much faster.
+1
level 52
Aug 6, 2014
From The Grammarist: "For the verb meaning (1) to beat or (2) to scold or berate, lambaste is the preferred spelling in American and Canadian English, while lambast is preferred in varieties of English from outside North America." So this one is a regional variant, not really an incorrect spelling. Merriam-Webster: "Supercede has occurred as a spelling variant of supersede since the 17th century, and it is common in current published writing. It continues, however, to be widely regarded as an error." So I guess I've been spelling this one wrong. Not that it comes up very often...
+1
level 20
Aug 7, 2014
22/27 Is that good for a 14 year-old Serbian? :)
+3
level 48
Jan 29, 2015
Lambast is the correct preferred spelling in the UK, so should be replaced with something else.
+1
level 65
Apr 28, 2015
It's almost as frustrating as typing "colour" into Microsoft word and seeing the red line underneath suggesting "color" as the correct spelling. We had this language first and I'm not prepared to lose it to the internet! :P
+1
level 42
Apr 15, 2017
You can set the language as your preferred variant of English though
+1
level 53
Jul 7, 2015
Won't accept 12th. Quizmaster please fix this is an OUTRAGE.
+2
level 48
Jul 24, 2015
"lambast" has been in use since 1850, including by renowned authors like Charles Dickens and Rudyard Kipling. http://grammarist.com/spelling/lambast-lambaste/
+1
level 58
Sep 7, 2015
I am embarrassed to say for how long "vinaigrette" stumped me.
+1
level 60
Mar 29, 2016
Shouldn't it be "Lembas"?
+2
level 42
Apr 15, 2017
Found the Tolkien nerd lol (I had that thought too)
+1
level 47
Mar 29, 2016
Too easy.
+1
level 24
Oct 24, 2016
So embarrassed about raspberry :\
+1
level 54
Jan 15, 2017
You could add words like definitely and tomorrow. I see those misspelled all the time by trying to put in "A" in there when neither have one. Also the word misspelled. :)
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
tamorrow, tomarrow or tomorraw?? I have never seen any of those. But definately, yes definitely. (And I am 95 % sure that that is the way I have learned it at school, because when I need to type the word my mind spells it out in syllables (and that really only happens with this word, so I think they have really been hammering it in ) de-fi-na-te-ly...
+1
level 60
Jan 15, 2017
I assume the best part of making this was not worrying about type ins.
+1
level 42
Mar 1, 2017
Anybody else have no clue that they've been spelling marshmallow wrong for their whole life?
+2
level 64
Apr 15, 2017
Since when does Lambast have an E on the end? That's ridiculous!
+2
level 71
Oct 12, 2018
“Lambast/Lambaste: For the verb meaning (1) to beat or (2) to scold or berate, lambaste is the preferred spelling in American and Canadian English, while lambast is preferred in varieties of English from outside North America.“ So interesting correction of what I thought was the right spelling. Possibly better placed in a differences between US and UK English quiz.
+1
level 47
Apr 15, 2017
The one I see frequently, is congradulations. It seems to be mostly Americans that do it, perhaps because they say it with a softer T than we Aussies....or perhaps its a new word to say to someone when they graduate! :)
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
I have never seen that one. Interesting. I guess people get confused because of graduate?
+1
level 76
Apr 15, 2017
Another one that drives me nuts is adviser vs. advisor. The latter is supposed to be correct, too, but I get a red line under it.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
Adviser advisor neither gets a red line with me, but for me adviser looks very wrong...!

Apparently both are correct, I just llooked it up. I am really curious why you dó get a red line..

I advise you to take my advice... That one is pretty confusing.. and easy to trip up on.

+1
level 27
Apr 15, 2017
My french helped me a lot for these! 24/27
+1
level 39
Apr 15, 2017
Adviser was always spelt "er" at the end in the UK, but over the last few years it is spelt "or" in job adverts. I think this has come from the US but just looks odd to me. Also, I don't understand why Ander is saying we pronounce words ending in "a" with an "er"sound. Nowhere in the UK have I heard people doing that.
+1
level 42
Apr 15, 2017
I've always seen it written "advisor" (in Canada) so it's the -er ending that looks strange to me :P
+1
level 73
Apr 17, 2017
You've clearly never been to Bristol then
+1
level 44
Apr 18, 2017
I have. I went in my Ford Cortiner and met some Doozers there. What's a Doozer you ask? They do's this and they do's that!
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
werent they those fraggle guys... ?
+1
level 32
Apr 20, 2017
http://www.moneysense.ca/save/investing/financial-advisor-or-adviser/
+1
level 66
Apr 15, 2017
This kind of quiz baffles me, why would anyone misspell these words? See the word once and there it is. Must be some 'murican thing.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
Nah, most of these happen anywhere, it is more an age and intelligence thing (and exposure, if everyone around you does it wrong and you never get to see the right versions..).

Sometimes certain spelling mistakes are regional, but usually not. (nuculair/nuclear might just be one of those ones that does get misspelled more often in america But I think that one is the exception)

+1
level 65
Apr 17, 2017
I tried "apatride" several times. Never thought of aparthdeid.
+2
level 74
Apr 18, 2017
Okay what's supposed to be the very obvious difference in PRONUNCIATION of marshamallow and marshmellow? Not native speaker obviously, but it doesn't seem to make a difference either way ...
+2
level 32
Apr 20, 2017
Why would anyone spell it "twelth?" That doesn't even sound like the same word. I'm not making fun of people, I just don't think anyone makes this mistake, unless it's a typo.
+1
level 38
May 3, 2017
How about Chaise (instead of cheese) and Lon Giland (instead of Long Island); Tree (instead of three) and dis (instead of this).
+1
level 25
Nov 3, 2017
The trouble I have is not spelling the word, it's pronouncing it differently from the way it's spelled!
+1
level 71
Dec 23, 2017
May I suggest 'mischevious' for the next one of these?
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
It is on the previous one..
+1
level 38
Nov 10, 2019
^ It's "Mischievous".
+1
level 57
Mar 13, 2018
26/27 last time and 27/27 this time. Not bad for an old bloke
+2
level 40
Mar 26, 2018
seeing the incorrect spellings certainly messed with my head but I will continue to use supersede and lambast. Lambaste sounds like something in cookery!!!
+1
level 40
Mar 26, 2018
supersede
+1
level 40
Mar 26, 2018
the autocorrect won't let me spell the way I want too!
+1
level 41
Apr 6, 2018
I Spam Type Pyscho For Psycho
+1
level 38
Jun 3, 2018
Lambaste was the first word I wrote (and correctly), yet was only credited 33%
+2
level 71
Aug 27, 2018
Agree with others - lambast is correct.
+2
level 69
Oct 12, 2018
Also supporting this campaign against non-North American spellings being represented as mistakes. The correct spelling is lambast in the UK. Please consider choosing one of many other less contentious words instead - if only to restore the QM's normally good reputation for keeping both sides of the Atlantic happy. Thanks.
+1
level 44
Oct 12, 2018
Very intelligent quiz-Thanks!
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
Intellegent is one that is spelled wrong often as well. I ve seen it quite often.
+1
level 63
Jun 17, 2019
28% of the people didnt see what was wrong with twelth??
+1
level 47
Sep 24, 2019
add phoenix, it would be fun to see the percentage on that
+1
level 38
Nov 10, 2019
For me, Phoenix isn't half as bad as Tucson to remember. I keep wanting to spell it Tuscon.