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Double C Answers

Based on the clues, guess these random things that contain the letters CC.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedOctober 29, 2013
Last updatedSeptember 19, 2018
Times taken13,785
Rating4.28
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Hint
Answer
Birthplace of Muhammed
Mecca
Top cash crop of Virginia
Tobacco
Roman god of wine
Bacchus
His nose grew when he told a lie
Pinocchio
Country where you'd find Casablanca
Morocco
Small Italian dumplings
Gnocchi
Famous wookiee
Chewbacca
Clever animal that can't be kept
out of Toronto's garbage bins
Raccoon
Famous "circus" in London
Piccadilly
Italian luxury brand
Gucci
Hint
Answer
Opposite of Oriental
Occidental
Smallest woodwind instrument
Piccolo
Capital of Corsica
Ajaccio
Vegetable hated by George H.W. Bush
Broccoli
James Bond's favorite casino game
Baccarat
Clan that feuded with the Hatfields
McCoy
"Witchcraft" religion invented in 1954
Wicca
Edward Jenner invented the first,
for smallpox
Vaccine
The Italian word for plaster
Stucco
Capital of Ghana
Accra
+2
level 76
Nov 13, 2013
TIL that I can't spell worth a crap. Any chance to accept alternate spellings of piccolo? I tried piccilo and piccalo and gave up. I know, I should just learn to spell...
+1
level 48
Dec 19, 2013
+1
+9
level 73
Jul 24, 2015
You're right - you should just learn to spell.
+1
level 63
Apr 23, 2016
'America' comes from Richard Ameryk - not Amerigo Vespucci. Ameryk was chief patron for John Cabot/Giovanni Caboto's exploratory voyages.Vespucci never used the term itself (he never even got to North America) and the earliest mentions of 'America' were in Bristol (England) - where Ameryk was based.
+4
level 76
Sep 20, 2018
Those who control the "Richard Amerike" and "American (word)" pages at Wikipedia disagree with you.
+1
level 48
Jan 29, 2019
That doesn't mean he's wrong. Not sure I'd trust Wikipedia....
+2
level 73
Feb 6, 2019
I'm not sure I'd trust a disaster plan either.
+1
level 60
Feb 16, 2019
They don't really. They just say there isn't hard evidence for it, but there isn't for vespuccio either (and using a first name isn't something that is generally done) they just agreed to stick with the other one.
+2
level 69
Sep 20, 2018
This is useful for improving my spelling. I knew all of these words but probably would have spelled half of them with only once 'C'. Hopefully I remember now.
+1
level 29
Jan 29, 2019
same same!
+1
level 77
Sep 20, 2018
spent a while not being able to get fresco out of my head so missed the actual one.
+1
level 75
Sep 21, 2018
I spent ages trying to think of fresco and never quite getting there
+3
level 67
Sep 23, 2018
Save me a trip to Google, "Clan that feuded with the Hatfields" what does this relate to?
+2
level 79
Jan 3, 2019
Once again we see that the "Ask Jetpunk comments instead of Google" strategy has failed miserably.
+1
level 48
Jan 29, 2019
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hatfield%E2%80%93McCoy_feud
+1
level 75
Jan 29, 2019
The nearly 30-year feud was a long-running battle between the Hatfield family of West Virginia, and the McCoys who lived across the creek in Kentucky. It began with Civil War skirmishes, flared up again over a hog, then again when a McCoy daughter married a Hatfield son, and eventually there was shooting into and burning of homes. Several family members were killed by the other side through the years, and state militia groups were also involved. A case arising from the feud regarding extradition went to the US Supreme Court. There have been books and movies about the feud, and it has become a common phrase used in the US as in, "Those kids are fighting like the Hatfields and McCoys." The feud is also referred to in the Waylon Jennings/Willie Nelson song, Luckenbach, Texas - "This successful life we're living has us feuding like the Hatfields and McCoys." So now you know and didn't have to look it up, but it's a really interesting history and I recommend you do.
+2
level 57
Jan 29, 2019
It's American Romeo and Juliet. Full of guns and diabetes.
+2
level 47
Jan 29, 2019
Italian for plaster is actually GESSO. Stucco is a different beast.
+1
level 21
Jan 29, 2019
Check out my quizzes
+1
level 35
Jan 30, 2019
Haven't seen anyone else mention bocconcini for 'small italian dumplings', when the dictionary definition of the two words are exactly the same. Gnocchi are little balls of potato, not very dumpling-like at all
+1
level 53
Jan 31, 2019
Please accept vaccination for vaccine.
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