Take another quiz >

Homonyms Quiz #1

We give you a pair of definitions. You guess the homonym.
Homonyms are words that have the same spelling and pronunciation, but different meanings.
Includes both true and polysemous homonyms
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
First submittedNovember 1, 2011
Last updatedJune 9, 2016
Times taken43,693
Rating3.84
5:00
Enter answer here:
0
 / 20 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Meanings
Answer
Type of bird
Catholic official
Cardinal
Spherical object
Formal dance
Ball
Legal arena
To romance
Court
Piece of sports
equipment
Fraudulent scheme
Racket
Piece of
superhero attire
Point of land that juts
into the sea
Cape
Half of a whale's tail
Improbable occurence
Fluke
Type of poker
Male breeding animal
Stud
Type of footwear
Trunk of a car in Britain
Boot
Elementary
Having a high pH
Basic
Strike with the fist
Fruit juice beverage
Punch
Meanings
Answer
Social gathering
Political group
Party
An addiction
Nun's clothing
Habit
To record
Adhesive material
Tape
Nifty
Without ice
Neat
Personnel
Wizard accessory
Staff
Type of fish
Diving position
Pike
Dark red color
To abandon on a
deserted island
Maroon
Place for strays
Unit of weight
Pound
Seaman's left
Type of fortified wine
Port
Boat maneuvered
using a pole
American football kick
Punt
+1
level 15
Nov 1, 2011
The highest is only 75%. Wow.
+1
level 61
Dec 13, 2018
87% now for cape
+3
level 55
Apr 28, 2014
My husband made fun of me for saying "tape" when I meant record. He has a point. When was the last time you recorded something on tape?
+7
level 77
Jul 29, 2014
When was the last time your boss paid you in salt? But we still use the word salary...
+1
level 63
Sep 3, 2015
Haha, fantastic point :)
+1
level 77
Jul 29, 2014
though, on the other hand, I do think "tape" as a verb is falling out of favor. Much more common to hear "record," "save," or even "TiVo" which is itself fairly obsolete. People still call their mobile phones cell phones even though we stopped using cellular technology a long time ago, but that term seems to be waning as well in favor of "mobile," "smart phone," or in some places "hand phone." Some terms like this stick and some don't.
+1
level 66
Oct 13, 2016
I always say tape. Regardless of what I mean. And it's been 10 years since I used a VHS to record.
+1
level 73
Oct 13, 2016
In my language (and probably others as well) we can still "spin" music, movies etc, regardless of the media
+1
level 76
May 12, 2017
Last week, actually.
+1
level 61
Dec 13, 2018
When is the last time you recorded something on a record?
+1
level 72
Sep 12, 2019
The verb came before the noun. That's a flip flopped comparison.
+2
level 50
Jun 21, 2014
I prefer elementary. Imagine Sherlock Holmes saying 'Basic, my dear Watson.' Yeah. No.
+2
level 49
Jul 29, 2014
Well, it's not like he ever said that 'quote' in the first place.
+6
level 49
Jul 29, 2014
It's not like he actually existed.
+2
level 50
Sep 6, 2014
Whatever, it still sounds cool. Actually, he came very close, when speaking to Watson, he did say 'Elementary,' and 'my dear Watson', in very close proximity to each other. Besides. 'Luke, I am your father' never actually happened. 'Beam me up, Scotty' never happened. It's just association.
+2
level 70
Jun 9, 2017
Oh c'mon, starbury. At least preface your comment with "SPOILER ALERT!". :-)
+1
level 25
Aug 7, 2015
Can we change "unit of weight" to "unit of mass" please?
+2
level 76
Nov 4, 2015
The clue is correct. Pounds are not a unit of mass; they are a unit of weight (or in a more general sense, force). Much of the confusion is because the typical unit used with the Imperial/US system is a force (pounds), whereas the typical metric/SI unit is a unit of mass (kilograms). Outside of science and engineering, few know the Imperial unit of mass (slugs) or the metric unit of force (Newtons). Adding to the confusion, quasi-official units have come into use, such as "kilogram-force" (kgf) and "pound mass" (lbm), which use earth's gravity as the "standard" acceleration relating force and mass.
+1
level 12
Dec 25, 2015
what about musket (bird) and musket (gun)
+2
level 46
Jul 6, 2016
So thanks to homonyms, the phrase "The ball is in your court" could mean that the formal dance is in your romance.
+2
level 50
Oct 13, 2016
No because court is a verb m8... that's like saying "the ball is in your swim"
+1
level 37
Oct 13, 2016
No, Court is definitly not a verb.
+2
level 58
Feb 9, 2019
Matthew07 are you serious?
+1
level 61
Oct 13, 2016
I believe the piece of sports equipment is spelled "racquet."
+1
level 57
Sep 17, 2018
In the UK it is. In the USA it's a racket.
+1
level 55
Oct 13, 2016
excellent challenge
+1
level 68
Oct 13, 2016
occurrence. two r's.
+3
level 52
Oct 18, 2016
i put "tea party" for the political group...
+1
level 52
Sep 28, 2018
are you from Boston??
+1
level 54
Feb 14, 2017
3.45
+1
level 44
Feb 23, 2017
did anyone else put commune for social gathering and political group?
+1
level 43
Aug 21, 2017
A pound is not a unit of weight, it is a unit of mass. A unit of weight is a Newton, for example.
+2
level 44
Jan 18, 2018
The clue is correct. Pounds are not a unit of mass; they are a unit of weight (or in a more general sense, force). Much of the confusion is because the typical unit used with the Imperial/US system is a force (pounds), whereas the typical metric/SI unit is a unit of mass (kilograms). Outside of science and engineering, few know the Imperial unit of mass (slugs) or the metric unit of force (Newtons). Adding to the confusion, quasi-official units have come into use, such as "kilogram-force" (kgf) and "pound mass" (lbm), which use earth's gravity as the "standard" acceleration relating force and mass. (Taken from FreeStateBear)
+1
level 72
Sep 12, 2019
Amazing. Long-form answer and still the same short-form objection appeared.
+1
level 65
May 23, 2018
This was a tricky one, I missed a few. Sometimes you see the answers and you're mad you didn't think of it but in this case I just was too flummoxed by half of a whale's tale, I had never heard that described as a fluke. Now I know!
+1
level 39
Jun 26, 2018
...i thought fluke was the whole tail end...
+1
level 61
Dec 13, 2018
Isnt racket just a lot of noise? (And something to play tennis with) never heard of it as a fraudulent scheme. I tried stick.. there is a stick-up...
+1
level 67
Apr 1, 2019
I don't agree with all of these, so I'll just make my own clues.

Piece of sports equipment - Fraudulent scheme - Noise Type of fish - Diving position - Weapon good against cavalry Boat maneuvered using a pole - American football kick - Country the ancient Egyptians used to trade with
+1
level 65
Jun 2, 2019
I bet that more people would guess the accessory if you made it “Gandalf’s accessory.”
+1
level 72
Sep 12, 2019
I wouldn't have a clue. Using a specific person versus a universal one wouldn't work for people who don't know who Gandalf is.