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English Contractions Quiz

Give the expanded form of these contractions.
Last updated: August 23, 2015
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Contraction
Stands For
Let's
Let us
Y'all
You all
Shan't
Shall not
Ma'am
Madam
A'ight
All right
Could've
Could have
I'd've
I would have
Don't
Do not
Can't
Can not
We're
We are
Contraction
Stands For
'Sup
What is up?
Zounds
God's wounds
Goodbye
God be with ye
Gonna
Going to
Dunno
Do not know
Wannabe
Want to be
Mo'
More
Innit
Is not it
G'day
Good day
Yes'm
Yes madam
Contraction
Stands For
'Em
Them
I'mma
I am going to
C'mon
Come on
Jr
Junior
Mr
Mister
Dr
Doctor
Sgt
Sergeant
'Til
Until
O'er
Over
N'er
Never
+4
level 43
Jan 17, 2012
I think "alright" should be accepted for "all right".
+2
level ∞
Jan 17, 2012
Okay. That will work now.
+3
level 64
Jul 24, 2018
Except alright is not a word.
+2
level 75
Oct 1, 2018
sure it is
+3
level 10
Apr 15, 2014
"Alright" technically is not a word.
+1
level 48
May 11, 2015
TheBluerock and samiam1955 are both correct. Technically, there is no such word as "alright". However, people have spelled "all right" as "alright", and many people use "alright", even though it really is not a word. Sure, the dictionary may say "alright" is a word, but it also says "funner" is a word. I find that to be hilarious.
+4
level 17
Jun 8, 2018
Language isn't static. The "rules" of grammar and the accepted words adapt over time. As far as just words, you can look up all sorts of examples if you dig a little bit. The technical revolution invented hundreds of words to describe the things that simply didn't exist before. And plenty of words have gone out of use for many different reasons, just google a list of archaic words. Have you ever tried to read middle or old English? It's completely different structure and a completely different vocabulary. Language adapts with the needs of society, it changes with major historical events and conflicts, and sometimes it just flat out gets altered for no good reason.
+3
level 66
Aug 3, 2018
'Alright' is as much a word as is 'almost', 'altogether', 'always', 'albeit'...
+1
level 66
Jan 17, 2012
A'ight is alright, not all right. Also I put in shall not twice and it wasn't accepted. And for the record, most of these are not contractions, but rather slang.
+2
level 81
Jan 17, 2012
"Alright" is a nonstandard word that is itself a contraction of all right. The Quizmaster has it correct.
+5
level 75
May 5, 2013
In common usage alright and all right actually mean two different things. Though some particularly snooty prescriptive grammarians reject the change, as they do all changes, as history has borne out those types always ultimately lose the argument. The contraction "Aiight" can mean both "all right" and "alright."
+4
level 68
Aug 1, 2015
Guess I'm just a snooty grammarian type, then...but I'm also right.
+1
level 17
Jun 8, 2018
kalbahamut, i love you
+1
level 41
Jan 17, 2012
I thought Mo' meant moment as in.... I'll be there in a mo'
+2
level 71
Jul 8, 2014
I thought it meant 'mother', as in mofo...
+2
level 64
Jul 24, 2018
I'd like some more fo, please.
+2
level 66
Aug 6, 2018
mo money, mo problems.
+1
level 29
Jan 17, 2012
There's no such thing as improper or poor speech. The language evolves; to say some new words of phrases are poor is wrong.
+1
level 45
Jun 2, 2015
But poor language remains just that and makes its users sound ignorant. If text speak becomes acceptable as written English I think that I shall give up and hie me to a nunnery!
+2
level 27
Jan 17, 2012
Zounds and Goodbye threw me! Even though they're not all contractions, it's a fun quiz! Love the grammar/language quizzes.
+1
level 42
Jan 17, 2012
Oh come on. If you accept "yes ma'am" and "what's up" you should accept "I'm going to". And donna, please, please, read up on the subject. Your attitude is outdated and dangerous.
+1
level ∞
Jan 17, 2012
"I'm going to" will work now.
+2
level 76
May 20, 2014
Dangerous?
+2
level 32
May 11, 2016
dangerous to his ego
+5
level 39
Jan 17, 2012
Both of the ones I missed had God in the them. No wonder
+1
level 55
Jan 18, 2012
I heard Goodbye meaning God Be With You before yet I had to cheat to get that one right and for Zounds I had no idea that it meant gods wounds(also cheating on Zounds).
+1
level 45
Jun 27, 2016
And now I see why the average scores are always so high. On some quizzes, I feel it is impossible for the average score to be so high, and I had suspected cheating for a while.
+3
level 70
Sep 6, 2016
Cheating is not necessarily rampant. I – and I expect many others – use these quizzes to learn. So when I get some answers wrong, I read up on them and am thereby edified. When I take the quiz again later (which I don't do right away, but weeks or months later), I have retained the new info and get those answers right. If more people are doing that, then that's pushing up the average.
+7
level 51
Jan 18, 2012
I've never heard the word "zounds" or the expression "God's wounds". :/
+1
level 67
Jun 18, 2017
You and me both!
+1
level 38
Jun 3, 2018
^ Same here. And I've only heard of "Goodbye" translated as "Go with God", or "by God's leave".
+1
level 44
Jan 18, 2012
@kal413, same for me, hehehe
+1
level 39
Jan 18, 2012
@frozenELEMENT: Cannot and Can not have two different meanings, albeit they are very similar in spelling. Subtle differences yes, but "Can not" is the correct one :P Missed Goodbye and Zounds - never heard of the contractions of either of them.
+2
level 50
Oct 1, 2018
Incorrect. "Can't" is a contraction of "cannot."
+1
level 50
Oct 1, 2018
And here is the link: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/can%27t
+2
level 17
Jan 19, 2012
dr, jr, sgt, and mr are abbriviations not contractions aren't they?
+1
level 17
Nov 28, 2017
Yeah...
+1
level 60
Jan 19, 2012
@imryan94: Can you tell us what the difference is, because I can't think how their meanings are different at all. As a kid I was always taught that "can not" is the incorrect spelling.
+2
level 16
Jun 28, 2012
can not = have the ability not to do something cannot = aren't able to do something
+1
level 52
Jan 20, 2012
I have always thought of mo' as moment-just a mo' or give us a mo' would be the examples. I have alway thought of innit being short for 'Is it not?' after all it's generally used as a question, innit?
+1
level 23
Feb 1, 2012
I'm pretty sure mo is short for moment.
+1
level 15
Feb 29, 2012
I WILL NE'ER SAY NE'ER. Thank god he's candian. LOL
+2
level 47
Mar 4, 2012
Cannot is one word. It is never written can not.
+2
level 61
Aug 8, 2014
no
+1
level 20
Mar 6, 2012
Learnt something new. Good bye actually means something.. Wow.
+1
level 47
Apr 5, 2012
Could not think of how to break down Goodbye, although it makes sense now, zounds however, I have never heard in my life!! Will accept knowing the rest as now I know...!
+1
level 20
May 31, 2012
Goodbye I would have thought was derived from "farewell" or "farethewell on your journey" hence "bye and bye". Maybe the definitions depend on which history book or bible a person reads.
+1
level 62
Jun 2, 2012
Could is it not be acceptable for "Innit" since "is not it" is O.K.?
+1
level 70
Apr 2, 2013
I agree. That's the only one I didn't get. I tried "is it not" and couldn't think of anything else. You would never say: is not it a good book. You'd say: is it not a good book.
+1
level 70
Sep 6, 2016
I actually could totally imagine saying (and it *is* grammatically correct), "Is not it a good book?" Speaking of totally, I am SO relieved to not've found "totes" on this quiz ;-)
+1
level 22
Jul 10, 2012
zounds is dead old-fashioned - probably floating all over the place in Shakespeare. "Gor blimey " is a good one too. Means "May God blind me". As a kid I was always discouraged from saying it because of what it really meant. Yes, well, I'm sure you all wanted to know that . . . . not . . .
+1
level 57
Jul 22, 2013
Strewth! Or, god's truth, if you prefer... ;-)
+1
level 76
May 20, 2014
Haha, never heard "strewth" until Monty Python. It's a fun and funny word.
+1
level 75
May 5, 2013
great quiz. Much more interesting than the name implies. I got everything, including god's wounds, except for "goodbye," even though I figured it was something along those lines.
+2
level 67
Dec 1, 2015
You got 'Zounds' and not 'Goodbye'........ that's quaint.
+1
level 73
Jun 8, 2013
Today I learned that contraction = abbreviation. I suppose Dr has been contracted down from it's full word, but i don't think that is the fundamental definition of contraction. I always thought you needed an apostrophe to replace a letter.
+1
level 25
Jun 25, 2013
I don't want to be that guy but mo' is also a contraction of homosexual. The main use of mo' though is moment, not more, unless you listen to a lot of rap.
+1
level 80
May 25, 2014
So "Good" in Goodbye means God. Does "Good" in "Good morning" also mean "God"? --- I am just glad I missed both God-related ones. Fare-thee-well!
+1
level 59
Sep 11, 2014
Good Dammit!
+1
level 31
Jun 19, 2014
Zounds sounds like something Velma or Shaggy would say. I'm not going to take sides but in English class we've always been taught that "All right" means all correct, or all set, or something, while "Alright" means okay or some form of agreement. As far as I've learned, they've always both been words. And I just finished up English 11R I literally took the exam today.
+1
level ∞
Jun 20, 2014
Your teacher is making stuff up.
+3
level 59
Oct 27, 2014
You're thinking of "Zoinks!" which of course means "God oinks".
+1
level 71
Aug 6, 2018
God’s oinks, surely ;)
+1
level 48
Jun 21, 2014
I like this quiz. But the comment forum is annoying. (Who cares if they're abbreviations or contractions? They're all deleting letters in the written form.) And I do wish that "Mrs" had been included in the quiz, if only to drive home the point that it doesn't come from "Mister's" and was never in any way possessive. It's "Mistress" (which came to be pronounced "missus"), which was a general form of address for women of authority and later came to be associated only with married women.
+1
level 36
Jun 21, 2014
Technically, Goodbye is an alteration of God Be With Ye, not a contraction
+2
level 50
Aug 6, 2014
Can't is a contraction for "cannot," not "can not." If you cannot do something, you are unable to do it. If you can not do something, it says you have a choice of whether or not you can do it.
+1
level 75
Aug 24, 2014
Where I live "is not it" is contracted to "id'nt".
+1
level 53
Oct 17, 2014
I'll probably get yelled at, but I'm pretty sure some of these contractions are just ebonic words.
+1
level 59
Oct 27, 2014
Y'all isn't a contraction. It is the English language's only distinct word to represent the pronoun of the 2nd Person Plural. The American South has the only form of English blessed with this construction, (in common with many other languages). The rest of us have to say "You" to mean both singular and plural and hope the context makes our meaning clear.
+2
level 76
Nov 17, 2014
So if it's not a contraction, why the apostrophe?
+1
level 39
Aug 30, 2015
Y'all just sounds so uneducated. So does mo' for more. Are they both from the southern States?
+1
level 43
Dec 16, 2014
isn't 'innit' - is it not?
+1
level 59
Jul 12, 2015
Yes, that is what I thought.
+1
level 28
Mar 10, 2015
"Zounds"
+1
level 27
Mar 12, 2015
Must say I'm totally stunned to learn zounds was originally god's wounds, especially since wounds and zounds don't rhyme, but I guess it's an example of both spelling *and* pronunciation changing over time. As several others ahead of me have pointed out, languages are dynamic and constantly changing. Except, obviously, for dead languages, such as Latin.
+1
level 59
Jul 12, 2015
So pleased it's (sorry, it is) not just me who hasn't (has not) heard of zounds. Have not heard of it, and would not know what it was if I had.
+1
level 49
Jul 14, 2015
could not guess anything for "Goodbye" and "Zounds." failed those.
+1
level 24
Jul 18, 2015
Zeus' wounds should work for Zounds as that is where the phase originates from, and is where the Z at the front comes from
+2
level 58
Nov 5, 2016
No. It comes from the "s" at the end of "gods".
+1
level 46
Aug 27, 2015
Seargent doesn't work :(
+1
level 39
Sep 5, 2015
For dunno I kept putting I do not know and couldn't figure out why it was wrong
+1
level 19
Nov 26, 2015
I do not know, haha.
+1
level 44
Sep 23, 2015
Dr, Mr, Sgt, etc. are all abbreviations, not contractions
+1
level 71
Oct 23, 2015
"Can't" is short for "cannot". Not "can not".
+1
level 60
Jan 6, 2016
made up "zounds" for this one? noice!
+1
level 49
Jan 19, 2016
"Innit" is a contraction for "Isn't it" which is a contraction for "Is it not". The quiz says "Is not it", which is wrong.
+1
level 50
Mar 23, 2016
may i point out that a contraction needs an apostrophe in it
+1
level 11
Mar 26, 2016
Glad I'm not the only one who didnt get "goodbye" and "zounds" like ??????????
+1
level 67
Apr 5, 2016
There are distinct differences in speech contractions and written contractions (to use the wording given). Mr is only used when written, you still pronounce 'Mister', likewise Dr, Jr, Sgt.
+2
level 21
May 12, 2016
Innit is actually Is it not because it implies a question to confirm something, not prove it wrong. Such as: "This is a great story, innit?", which means "This is a great story, is it not?" and not "This is a great story, is not it?"
+2
level 58
Sep 9, 2016
Totally agree, ChaosQuizzer. No one ever says IS NOT IT but you can say IS IT NOT?
+1
level 67
Aug 6, 2018
I think 'innit' means isn't it, many English speaking people say 'isn't it' and this becomes 'innit' in some regions. e.g. "Its a good movie innit?"
+1
level 39
Nov 12, 2018
Absolutely correct. Very common phrase in UK english, particularly London
+1
level 34
May 26, 2016
bad quiz and can't is spelled cannot not "can not"
+1
level 58
Mar 22, 2017
Sorry, but where I live, Mo' is definitely Motherf***er.
+1
level 54
May 1, 2017
innit = is it not
+1
level 1
May 2, 2017
Zounds! come on....what is that?
+1
level 45
May 4, 2017
I'MMA, I am going to should be correct.
+1
level 20
May 6, 2017
zounds? wtf?????
+1
level 24
Jun 21, 2017
Whoo, I got 'zounds'! Though I did miss ''em', so I guess I'm smart and stupid in equal measure.
+1
level 67
Aug 29, 2017
Lummy. Worra lorra comments, innit? Wadyu rekun?
+1
level 79
Sep 6, 2017
Moustache really should work for 'Mo'.
+1
level 13
Jan 7, 2018
no
+1
level 48
Sep 6, 2017
I do not know doesn't work as a possible answer.
+1
level 13
Jan 7, 2018
Zounds, Hogan! Our mule has been stolen!
+1
level 40
Mar 30, 2018
I thought 'innit' was 'is it not'
+1
level 69
Mar 30, 2018
zounds and goodbye don't belong in this quiz. Otherwise, pretty easy!
+1
level 39
Jul 28, 2018
...i agree along with imma and sup...
+2
level 58
Aug 2, 2018
Why not?
+1
level 20
Apr 5, 2018
100% with 2:34 left
+1
level 32
Apr 30, 2018
24/30 but i'm french
+1
level 57
Aug 4, 2018
23/30 but I'm german
+1
level 41
Aug 3, 2018
surely 'innit'. is 'is it not' ?
+1
level 38
Aug 3, 2018
Surely!
+1
level 67
Aug 6, 2018
No, but this is a good quiz innit?
+1
level 53
Aug 3, 2018
there's so much wrong with this quiz i don't even know where to begin... first of all, a contraction indicates legit English, as opposed to slang, which half this quiz consists of. second, "Jr., Mr., Dr., and Sgt., 'til, ma'am, 'em, mo', n'er, and o'er" are NOT contractions. they're abbreviations. a contraction combines two words to make one. and finally, can't is short for "cannot." it's one word, not two.
+1
level 39
Aug 6, 2018
...annoying, innit?...
+1
level 50
Oct 1, 2018
Thank you. Drove me crazy, too. A third of these are contractions. Others are slang, abbreviations, or just shortened forms of speech
+1
level 57
Aug 4, 2018
Yesn't
+1
level 42
Aug 19, 2018
I have never in my life heard of such a thing as "God's Wounds". Where exactly is this colloquialism from?
+1
level 76
Sep 24, 2018
It's quite a dated phrase that's used quite a lot in Shakespeare, at least as "Zounds".
+1
level 50
Oct 1, 2018
Says it is archaic. I may have heard Zounds once or twice, but only as a surprise exclamation. God's wounds is a new one on me.
+1
level 41
Sep 30, 2018
Many of these are not contractions at all- they are abbreviations which are not the same thing. Contractions occur ONLY when two words become one by using an apostrophe. (Did not read all comments so perhaps this fact was already mentioned.)
+1
level 28
Oct 1, 2018
I agree jr mr dr sgt are all abbreviations but let us you all shall not madam all right could have I would have do not can not we are what is up gods wounds god be with ye going to do not know want to be more is not it good day yes madam them I am going to come on until over never are contractions
+1
level 43
Oct 1, 2018
"Zounds". Has anybody ever said that?
+1
level 24
Oct 26, 2018
Goodbye is a compound word