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English Idioms Quiz #3

Fill the blanks in these English language idioms.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: October 2, 2014
First submittedApril 18, 2012
Times taken43,643
Rating4.26
4:00
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Idiom
A diamond in the rough
Fly off the handle
Drown one's sorrows
Got off on the wrong foot
Hot and bothered
Have an axe to grind
Follow to the ends of the Earth
Keep your powder dry
Cross the Rubicon
That's the $64,000 question
Idiom
Never a dull moment
Firing on all cylinders
Wolf in sheep's clothing
A hard nut to crack
No strings attached
A fly in the ointment
Third time's a charm
Behind the eight ball
Rob Peter to pay Paul
Par for the course
Idiom
Without rhyme or reason
Beyond the pale
Albatross around one's neck
Not worth a hill of beans
Read between the lines
Hold your horses!
Put one's house in order
A shoulder to cry on
Came out of left field
Thank one's lucky stars
+3
level 77
Apr 18, 2012
Great quiz!
+1
level 25
Apr 18, 2012
aww, i always thought it was "pile" or "mound" of beans.
+1
level 61
Apr 18, 2012
Axe is mispelled (missing the 'e')
+1
level 42
Apr 18, 2012
"Ax" is an alternate spelling of "axe". Both are acceptable. But I've never ever heard "keep your powder dry". And I vote NO on "hold your breath". That's not an idiom. "Hold your horses" is an idiom, because it has a non-literal meaning.
+2
level 77
Apr 18, 2012
How about "Hold your tongue"?
+1
level 48
Apr 12, 2013
I agree, 'Don't hold your breath' would be, but not 'Hold your breath'.
+1
level 76
Aug 5, 2014
According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trust_in_God_and_keep_your_powder_dry, "Trust in God and keep your powder dry" first appeared in a poem by William Blacker in 1834 who attributed the statement to Oliver Cromwell who said it to his troops when invading Ireland. Through the years the second half of the maxim became more commonly used.
+3
level 53
Feb 20, 2015
Not a good example. You can absolutely hold horses. In fact, that's exactly the definition of the saying. Sounds literal to me.
+2
level 29
Apr 18, 2012
Um... ax is a very archaic spelling of axe, axe is far more widely accepted... Seems odd, to say the least.
+1
level 76
Dec 10, 2015
Ax is the American spelling, I think.
+1
level 32
Apr 18, 2012
I've always heard "not worth a row of beans." I've also heard "get off on the wrong track." I think "hold your tongue" should be an acceptable answer as well. Just suggestions, it was a great quiz!
+5
level 58
Apr 20, 2012
I kept reading the statement as "Rob Peter" and thinking who is that? Once I saw the answer...
+1
level 41
Feb 22, 2015
I did that too
+1
level 44
Jul 9, 2019
Just realized that wasn't what it meant oops
+1
level 58
Apr 26, 2012
Any possibility of accepting "clothes" for "clothing"?
+1
level ∞
Apr 27, 2012
Okay. That will work now.
+2
level 25
May 10, 2012
Best explanation of beyond the pale is here: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/beyond-the-pale.html Got all with 3:04 left!
+1
level 66
Apr 19, 2018
Thank you, very nicely stated.
+1
level 20
May 11, 2012
@CraigA51 Thanks! I've always wondered what "beyond the pale" meant
+2
level 20
Sep 8, 2012
Fly off the _____ kinda reminds me of Fly on the wall. Sad that 'wall' isn't the answer XD!
+2
level 41
Dec 21, 2012
22. "par for the course" i guess!!
+4
level 28
May 1, 2013
I have never heard "That's the $64,000 question" before, I've always heard it as "That's the million dollar question". I guess you could say it with any form of monetary value, so I still go it right. Woot!
+1
level 71
Nov 21, 2014
Pretty easy really. couldn't think of what went with rubicon.
+1
level 74
Feb 20, 2015
30/30 with 3:11 remaining. You can do it too!
+2
level 76
Feb 20, 2015
I just did.
+1
level 35
Feb 20, 2015
Why is it the $64000 question when it is 'English Idioms'? Surely it should be £1000000?
+2
level 28
Feb 20, 2015
Yes & no. If you mean "English" to equal "British" you're correct, but if you're talking about the English *language* (spoken in many countries where the unit of currency is not the pound) and I believe this was the quizmaster's intention, then 64000 question is spot on.
+1
level 70
Feb 20, 2015
I always heard "Firing on all pistons".
+1
level 28
Feb 20, 2015
Have certainly heard that, but cylinders is what immediately came to mind for me.
+1
level 60
Feb 20, 2015
I've always heard "Bury your Sorrows" as well. I think that should be accepted.
+1
level 28
Feb 20, 2015
I always thought it was a "tough" nut to crack, rather than "hard." If that had been the blank to fill instead of crack, I probably would have failed to get it.
+2
level 71
Feb 28, 2016
Same here; only ever heard *tough* nut to crack.
+2
level 13
Mar 16, 2015
feel so dumb i missed: hold your HORSES. i can't believe i missed something so obvious. i kept trying tongue. :/
+1
level 21
Aug 15, 2015
Make easy points: - Press 'Give Up?' - Take screenshot of the answers - Start quiz again and enter all answers - Repeat for all quizzes on Jetpunk - Get to level 99!
+1
level 62
Jan 18, 2017
Pathetique
+1
level 44
May 11, 2016
I think Third Time's A Charm is more of an American thing. I always said Third Time Lucky
+1
level 62
Jan 18, 2017
Same.
+1
level 12
Jun 16, 2016
More time!
+1
level 61
Nov 9, 2016
I got 29 of 30, 97%...better than 92% of other quiz takers who averaged 20 out of 30...but that's only good for 4 points out of 5?
+1
level 23
Mar 2, 2018
These quizzes are such good fun
+1
level 46
Mar 14, 2018
i have never heard like 2/3rds of these
+1
level 66
Apr 19, 2018
These are all classics, it's interesting to realize just how MANY idioms one encounters and/or uses in every day life.
+2
level 44
Jun 29, 2018
hold your tongue! I would consider that an idiom.
+2
level 63
Mar 22, 2019
It should definitely accept hold your tongue. Especially since that exclamation mark is there, it makes tongue come to mind before horses. And just a question, isnt follow to the end of the world a thing?
+1
level 86
Apr 9, 2019
I always heard it as "Fly off the rails."
+1
level 63
Nov 20, 2019
please accept rhythm for reason. I have heard it both ways.
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