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Ethnic Groups by Country Quiz #2

Name the modern-day country that has the largest population of each selected ethnic group.
Answer must correspond to highlighted box
Last updated: March 07, 2017
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Ethnic Group
Country
Arabs
Egypt
Basques
Spain
Khmer
Cambodia
Hmong
China
Tagalog
Philippines
Sinhalese
Sri Lanka
Inuit
Denmark (Greenland)
Ethnic Group
Country
Sherpas
Nepal
Uyghurs
China
Druze
Syria
Tatars
Russia
Berbers
Morocco or Algeria
Hispanics
Mexico
Zulus
South Africa
Ethnic Group
Country
Nubians
Sudan
Afrikaners
South Africa
Bengalis
Bangladesh
Acadians
Canada
Cherokees
United States
Javanese
Indonesia
Bedouins
Sudan
+1
level 32
Oct 22, 2012
Very interesting quiz. I also expected Kurds to be on the list... btw, isn't this quiz meant to show up minorities? Just because of the Arabs in Egypt, thought they're the majority.
+3
level 61
Oct 31, 2012
The quiz instructions mention nothing about minorities.
+1
level 49
Apr 14, 2015
In the bible it explains that Hagar, an Egyptian woman had a child, Ishmael, with Abraham. Ishmael became the first Arab.
+5
level 45
Apr 27, 2015
Do you really have to bring the Bible into this? Can't we have one comment section without some literal Bible believer claiming we all came from one dude a few thousand years ago. That has been refuted big time, and I'm sick of hearing about it over and over again
+1
level 66
Aug 20, 2017
Oh boy.
+2
level 75
Aug 20, 2017
It's funny seeing people try to make historical sense of stories with as much credence as The Tortoise and the Hare or The Little Engine That Could.
+4
level 58
Aug 20, 2017
Oh no! Are you telling me, after all these years, that The Little Engine actually Couldn't??? ;-)
+1
level 75
Aug 20, 2017
Fret not, Cwej. I'm sure Solomon has some kind of detailed analysis that proves the Little Engine, in fact, Could.
+3
level 55
Aug 23, 2017
Whoa, why all the hostility?! if you don't like religious posts, just pass on by. All the person did was share some info. I found it interesting, at least. It's not like they preached a sermon full of fire and brimstone. No need to get your atheistic panties in a bunch XD
+2
level 75
Aug 24, 2017
ryan: that's a popular meme amongst the religious these days, but it's not a well supported idea. The old Jewish texts that became the Old Testament include all sorts of mundane minutiae concerning specific histories and genealogies; a book intended to be purely a philosophical work wouldn't bother with that. Christian theology falls apart completely if the history presented in Genesis is not literally true. Archaeology as a discipline was born when early Christians traveled to Palestine in search of artifacts proving the validity of the Bible, based on the belief that it was a literal and true history. The historical record indicates strongly that everyone from Moses on up to Pat Robertson believed the Bible (and Quran) to be literally true and an accurate historical record.

Of course, the fact that it is so obviously not is inconvenient to believers today. And, so, this metaphor/allegory meme was born and popularized.
+2
level 75
Mar 17, 2019
(someone who has since been purged left a comment here suggesting that Christians don't take the Bible as literal truth but understand it was written as allegory)
+1
level 75
Jan 26, 2014
Got everything except for the Acadians.

Personally I do not buy that there are many ethnic Arabs in Egypt at all. Arabic-speaking people around the world did not start to identify themselves as Arabs until the rise of Arab Nationalism which began in the 1900s. This was a political movement that grew out of a combination of things including opposition to Ottoman (Turkish) rule over most Arabic-speaking people, Western Imperialism up to and immediately following World War I, and most importantly, the personal ambitions of the Sharif of Mecca and his opposition to Zionism, the growth of which encroached on his own political power interests, which by cynically and erroneously labeling as Arab and Muslim issues he successfully changed from a local issue into the cause-du-jour of the entire Arabic-speaking world and greater Muslim ulemma for the next century.

+1
level 75
Jan 26, 2014
Anyway the people of Egypt are Egyptians or Copts. Historically, "Arab" only applied to the desert nomads who lived beyond the borders of civilization which stopped at Jordan, Israel, and Iraq. Before 1900 or 1850 if you had asked any Egyptian if they were Arab they would have been perplexed. As conquered subjects of 12th Century Arabs they were forced to adopt some components of Arab culture, language, and religion; but they did not become Arabs to my mind any more than the Cherokee became English. Popular political movements of the last century convinced most of them otherwise, but in my opinion the only real Arabs in the world are the people indigenous to Yemen and to a lesser extent the other countries of the Arabian peninsula (Saudi Arabia, Oman, the UAE, Qatar, Bahrain, Kuwait).
+1
level 75
Jan 26, 2014
Did I say Sharif of Mecca? ... I meant the Mufti of Jerusalem.
+1
level 75
Apr 14, 2015
Acadians were easy for me because of Longfellow's poem, "Evangeline". The French Acadians from Nova Scotia moved to Louisiana and became the Cajuns.
+1
level 67
Apr 14, 2015
This is the forest primeval...
+1
level 59
Apr 14, 2015
Ah, yes, another never-ending demographic debate: Should Arabs be distinguished by country borders and in which contexts to do it?
+1
level 75
Apr 14, 2015
Not really like that. Are Jamaicans English? Are Equatorial Guineans Spanish? If no, then why would we consider Moroccans or Lebanese to be Arabs?
On the other hand, ethnicity is whatever identity people ascribe to themselves, so even if we can see that this trend is completely recent and more to do with politics than anything else, if Egyptians, Algerians, Sudanese and Iraqis want to call themselves Arab, then I suppose they're Arab. I just won't think of them as such. No need for a debate.
+1
level 72
Oct 27, 2016
Why would we consider Englishmen to be English then?
+1
level 75
Jun 21, 2017
Maybe because in addition to speaking English and being English in culture they also live in England, and most have family histories and genetics going back that are also thoroughly English. Their parents, grand parents, and great great great grandparents were probably all or predominantly English. The difference here is mainly that the Arabic-speaking people outside of the Arabian peninsula did not think of themselves as Arabs (and most are not, at least in terms of genetic lineage) until pretty recently. I guess that's the only reason I find it odd. But we're already at a point where most people just take this for granted and within another few generations I'm sure it will just be assumed that this is how it always was. That's how these things tend to work...
+3
level 72
Aug 20, 2017
So apparently it's just a question of time before a new mix or acquired identity becomes "official", and yeah, ethnicity is mostly a matter of self-identification. The only wrong thing I see is what you mention at the end – assuming it has always been like this. But it's the same in Europe. There was also a time when many tribes/ethnic groups/populations ... were only recently considered French/German/Spanish/Italian/Russian/Turkish/... and it was all quite political of course, i.e. depending on where the borders were drawn and who conquered whom. The only significant difference with Arabs I see is that many Arab countries don't have a majority Arab origin, but even that is debatable also elsewhere.
+2
level 75
Mar 17, 2019
Djilas: yes, exactly, we agree completely.
+1
level 56
Apr 14, 2015
huh. the only time i've read about sherpas was in tintin in tibet, i thought it was a job, a guide or something.
+1
level 47
Apr 16, 2015
The Sherpa are an ethnic group living in Nepal, which is where Mt. Everest is located. Since they're acclimated to the extreme lack of oxygen up there, it's pretty valuable to take one of the indigenous people with you when you try to climb the mountain. Don't worry, you're not alone; I used to think the Sherpa guide was a position or some kind of job, too.
+1
level 60
Apr 14, 2015
really enjoyed the quiz
+1
level 57
Apr 15, 2015
I decided that we were shooting for the 8th century BCE with Acadian and kept guessing Mesopotamian countries. I apparently know more about Akkadians than I do about Canadians. Sorry Canada!
+1
level 66
Apr 21, 2015
Greenland never crossed my mind for Inuit habitation. I tried USA (Alaska), Canada, and Russia, then moved on. Oh well.
+1
level 59
Apr 2, 2017
Same!
+1
level 61
Aug 20, 2017
Yeah, same here
+1
level 75
Aug 20, 2017
I tried Canada and the US first as well, but after that there's really not too many other places to try, so I got it.
+2
level 67
Mar 18, 2019
After Canada, Alaska, and Russia (and before Denmark), I tried various Central and South American countries, on the off-chance that the quiz was looking for all descendants of the people who crossed the Bering Strait.
+1
level 45
Nov 4, 2016
I think Hispanics as an ethnic group is really primarily used in the United States. People living in Spanish-speaking countries don't really refer to themselves that way. You'd be more likely to find people claiming indigenous ethnicities.
+1
level 58
Aug 24, 2017
Right, there are Hispanics of American, European, African, Asian, Middle Eastern, and mixed heritage, Hispanic/Latinx isn't really an ethnic group
+2
level 65
Nov 9, 2018
Also the Portuguese are Hispanic so shouldn't Brazil be the largest one instead of Mexico? Hispania was the Roman province of modern-day Iberian peninsula, which includes Portugal. Therefore the Portuguese-speaking parts of Latin America are Hispanic.
+1
level 38
Aug 20, 2017
i only guessed basques, javanese, khmer,sherpas,zulus,bengalis,tagalog,hmong and tatars. COol Quiz!
+1
level 56
Aug 20, 2017
great quiz!
+1
level 43
Aug 20, 2017
I'll admit I didn't have a clue for most of these! Good quiz
+1
level 22
Aug 20, 2017
Hi everyone! I made a quiz based around important people in European History! If that interests you, please check it out on my profile. The name is "Influential Figures in European History".
+1
level 22
Aug 26, 2017
I'm pretty sure being Hispanic/Latin doesn't mean you're part of an ethnic group? You can find Hispanic people all over the world, there are indigenous ethnic groups among Latin population like Mapuches, etc.
+1
level 67
Sep 16, 2017
I think 'Hispanic' has become to mean 'Spanish Speaking' these days, and as that Mexico would be correct.
+1
level 75
Mar 17, 2019
Hispanic means "of or relating to the Spanish language or culture."

If you come from a Spanish-speaking country, you are Hispanic.
+1
level 63
Apr 1, 2018
shouldn't the largest population of Hispanic people be in the USA? 'Hispanic' doesn't really exist as an ethnic group anywhere else. In Mexico people identify as Mexicans or whatever ethnic minority in Mexico they are
+2
level 38
Apr 28, 2018
True. In most of the world people identify themselves by their country of origin: i.e., Jamaican, Peruvian, Barbadian, Dutch, German, Indian, etc., etc. Only the USA seems intent on "defining" us further.
+1
level 75
Mar 17, 2019
false
+1
level 75
Mar 17, 2019
false
+1
level 51
Mar 17, 2019
For Bedouins, I typed South Sudan thinking I had already typed Sudan, but I didn't....
+1
level 43
Mar 18, 2019
isn't the population of bedouins in Saudi Arabia greater than that of Sudan?