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European Greetings Quiz

Translate these greetings into various European languages.
Translations are not word-for-word
Not all translations are exact, because that wouldn't be possible
Last updated: February 10, 2017
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Hello
Spanish
Hola
French
Bonjour / salut
Italian
Ciao / salve
German
Hallo
 
 
Goodbye
Spanish
Adiós
French
Au revoir
Italian
Ciao
German
Auf Wiedersehen
 
 
Please
Spanish
Por favor
French
S'il vous plaît
Italian
Per favore
German
Bitte
 
 
Thank you
Spanish
Gracias
French
Merci
Italian
Grazie
German
Danke
You're welcome
Spanish
De nada
French
Je vous en prie / de rien
Italian
Prego / di niente
German
Bitteschön
 
 
Welcome
Spanish
Bienvenido
French
Bienvenue
Italian
Benvenuto
German
Willkommen
 
 
Good day
Spanish
Buenos días
French
Bonjour
Italian
Buongiorno
German
Guten Tag
Good evening
Spanish
Buenas tardes
French
Bonsoir
Italian
Buonasera
German
Guten Abend
 
 
How are you? (formal)
Spanish
¿Cómo está?
French
Comment allez-vous ?
Italian
Come sta?
German
Wie geht es Ihnen?
 
 
See you later
Spanish
Hasta luego
French
À plus tard
Italian
Arrivederci
German
Bis später
+3
level 75
Mar 16, 2014
Knew many of the German ones, but how to spell them? That's a different story.

I should have remembered "A plus tard." I'd never heard the expression before until watching The Lego Movie with Arabic and French subtitles. "See you later, alligator" was translated as "A plus tard, leopard."

My deepest, sircerest, and most heartfelt apologies to anyone whose lives were significantly impacted by being forced against their will to read this comment which is of course onerously and inconsiderately long and contains grossly offensive fragments of personal anecdote. I realize it's a horrible thing I've done and hope you will find it in your hearts to forgive me for this.
+1
level 43
Mar 16, 2014
Maybe one day I will be able to forgive you
+1
level 39
Mar 16, 2014
I won't
+1
level 75
Apr 1, 2014
thanks cdguy. Jacko, I'm sorry to hear that. I will blog extensively about the suffering that this causes me and the personal journey I will have to go through to find acceptance of your disapproval, and in the future post a link.
+2
level 57
May 29, 2016
Red-handed! Caught you here, Kal: you don't blog!
+1
level 75
Jun 3, 2018
this is true.
+1
level 25
Jul 8, 2016
Define 'impacted'. My dinner went a little cold...does that qualify? :/
+1
level 75
Feb 10, 2017
I'm one who enjoys personal anecdotes related by others, and I had no idea there were people out there who weren't tirelessly waiting in hopes I would relate a new one. From this point on I hope everyone will accept that all of my posts also contain Kal's last paragraph, in spirit if not in written word. "A plus tard, leopard," - love it. :)
+1
level 75
Feb 10, 2017
I think when I originally made this comment it was when, on the same day but a separate quiz, some people had complained at length about me posting an anecdote in the comments section. I really don't get why people get so put out by people making comments. To share stories. To make an observation. To share their results. To comment on the quiz's difficulty. To make a political statement. Or for any other reason. If you don't like reading comments.... don't read the comments.
+2
level 72
Feb 12, 2017
I never, ever heard someone tell me "À plus tard, léopard" but I think it's so awesome that I'll begin to use it routinely, to everyone's great dismay.
+1
level 23
Feb 13, 2017
I love how you casually watch The Lego Movie with Arabic and French subtitles
+1
level 75
Jun 3, 2018
it's not like I put on strange subtitles at home to learn odd expressions in foreign languages... I forget where I was watching it but maybe in Bahrain. They usually subtitle all the films there in Arabic, sometimes in French, and sometimes in Hindi or Marathi or Bengali. There are a lot of foreigners living in Bahrain.
+1
level 44
Mar 16, 2014
Only missed 2 of the German ones (1 of which I knew very well, but blanked). Great quiz! Multilevel, I mean multilingual thinking :P
+1
level 58
Mar 16, 2014
bis spater? new to me that one (despite studying german for 7 years!). Benvenuto was a banana skin as I couldn't spell it. Anyone know why its 'ben' and not 'buon'?
+1
level 49
Mar 18, 2014
ben is the adverbial form, buon(a) the adjective form
+2
level 36
Mar 18, 2014
How can you study German for that long and NOT know "bis später"??
+1
level 24
Apr 29, 2014
Bis später is perfectly normal - native Austrian here. However, the game didn't accept my "spater" (living in the US and not usually bothering to change the settings). Might make it easier for a lot of people if "spater" was accepted.
+1
level ∞
Apr 29, 2014
Okay, just später will work now.
+1
level 40
Nov 10, 2017
Well, ''bis später'' is totally common in Germany... We use it every day. I can't believe you could have studied German for 7 years without knowing bis später...
+1
level 73
Mar 16, 2014
It's like these French have a different word for everything.
+1
level 61
Jan 13, 2017
...except a word for 'entrepreneur'.
+1
level 55
Feb 10, 2017
'entrepreneur' is a french word :-)
+2
level 72
Feb 10, 2017
I suspect Bonzo007 knows that.
+1
level 57
Feb 10, 2017
How about a six page papier?
+1
level 72
Mar 16, 2014
Although auf wiedersehen is used for goodbye, its literal translation is "to again see you" so it would fit the "See you later" category too.
+1
level 70
Apr 9, 2014
basically this is true for au revoir as well.
+1
level ∞
Nov 23, 2016
True. Of course "goodbye" doesn't mean "goodbye forever" in 99% of cases. Au revoir is the correct translation. Adieu has other connotations.
+1
level 38
Apr 9, 2018
Totally agree with both comments concerning "auf wiedersehen" and "au revoir" .
+1
level 75
Jun 3, 2018
I was going to comment on this. Learned this from watching another movie. In this case, Inglorious Basterds.
+3
level 59
Mar 17, 2014
"Tschüss" would be a better fit for "Goodbye" in German. "Auf Wiedersehen" isn't wrong though. "Gern geschehen" would be better for "You're welcome".
+1
level 81
Mar 17, 2014
Agree with tschüß for goodbye, but bitte is the best fit for 'you're welcome.'
+2
level 36
Mar 18, 2014
Thirded. That was the first thing I tried... alas.
+1
level 71
Mar 22, 2014
I thought just 'gerne' for you're welcome
+2
level 34
May 3, 2015
I agree with you. "Tschüss" was the first word I tried, having studied German for four years. It is one of the first things you learn.
+1
level ∞
Nov 23, 2016
Tschüß will work now. Thanks.
+1
level 57
Jul 7, 2014
Can you not have 'ca va' for 'how are you' in french?
+1
level 42
Apr 15, 2016
Yes and for the formal, can't you put COMMENT ca va?
+1
level ∞
Nov 23, 2016
I don't think it's formal, but okay.
+1
level 76
Feb 10, 2017
Comment ça va is rather informal.
+1
level 45
Apr 25, 2015
Again, too slow typing.
+1
level 66
Apr 27, 2015
thanks for being so lenient with the spelling
+1
level 44
Dec 7, 2015
Good quiz :). I know it's incorrect, but can you accept 'bienvenu' for 'bienvenue'? It's what I tried and how I missed this one. And I agree with some people here on 'tschüss' instead of (or at least as another option of) 'auf wiedersehen'.
+1
level 64
Dec 26, 2015
In Italian, "See you later" would be more properly translated into "a dopo", after all similarly to Spanish, French and German. When studying English we learn that arrivederci translates into goodbye, or more properly and similar to the other languages into "addio" (even though it means something like "bye for good", I'll never see you again)
+1
level 48
Mar 22, 2016
A più tardi and ci vediamo should also be acceptable for "see you later" in Italian.
+1
level 73
Apr 19, 2016
Me too. How odd! Quizmaster, perhaps this is a mistake. Ca va is French, not Spanish. Perhaps they meant to add it as an alt spelling for comment allez-vous (which would be correct, though not so formal). They could also add "comment ça va" as well.
+1
level ∞
Apr 20, 2016
This has been fixed
+1
level 45
Jun 9, 2016
Tschüss is german for goodbye. Auf Wiedersehen means something like See you again.
+1
level 47
Jan 13, 2017
I agree - I tried Tschuess (e instead of Umlaut) but it didn't accept it
+1
level 70
Aug 11, 2016
Well I got all the Spanish ones, no trouble. The rest... more of a mixed bag.
+1
level 39
Sep 13, 2016
Here is the quote from Django Unchained: Dr. King Schultz: Mister Candie, normally I would say "Auf wiedersehen," but since what "auf wiedersehen" actually means is "'till I see you again", and since I never wish to see you again, to you, sir, I say goodbye!
+1
level 77
Feb 10, 2017
Which is why I thank Quentin Tarantino for helping me out on this quiz.
+1
level 68
Jan 13, 2017
Il n'y a pas de quoi is what I remember from high school French for You're welcome. But that was a long time ago.
+1
level 76
Feb 10, 2017
Absolutely. Please accept "Il n'y a pas de quoi". On the other hand, "Je vous en prie" is quite rare.
+1
level 65
Feb 10, 2017
Native French speaker here. Both are correct, however "Je vous en prie" is more formal. Most people simply say "De rien".
+1
level ∞
Feb 10, 2017
«Il n'y a pas de quoi» will work now, although I also feel like the vast majority say «de rieni»
+1
level 76
Feb 11, 2017
"De rien" is a bit informal, but is the most common expression, yes. By the way, both that and "Il n'y a pas de quoi" mean that one has done nothing that deserves a thank.
+2
level 55
Feb 10, 2017
Good evening can be translated 'bonsoir', but also 'bonne soirée' which is not accepted… Too bad!
+1
level 67
Feb 10, 2017
Whats wrong with gruss Gott for hello in German?
+1
level 59
Feb 10, 2017
I think that's rather regional. And most foreigners have probably never heard of it.
+1
level 72
Feb 10, 2017
Grüß Gott is used in Austria, Bavaria and a few other places. A significant enough portion of germanophones to accept it as a valid answer. However, it's very unlikely that someone would know this and not Hallo / Guten Tag, so if it Grüß Gott doesn't work, just try something else.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gr%C3%BC%C3%9F_Gott
+1
level ∞
Feb 10, 2017
Grüß Gott will work now
+1
level 69
Feb 10, 2017
Not sure 'good day' is the best English translation. Nice quiz!
+1
level 40
Jan 5, 2018
But... it's the literal Translation. I guess English People are the only ones thad don't say Good day...
+1
level 54
Feb 10, 2017
in german you also say "schüss!
+1
level 75
Feb 10, 2017
Auf wiedersehen = "Upon seeing you again", which is pretty darn close to "see you later". At least as close as "bis spater"="till later" is.
+1
level 76
Feb 10, 2017
Semantically yes, but it's a question of context, of usage. When you say "See you later" in English, a German will say "Bis später/Bis Bald" and a French will say "A plus (tard)". On the other hand "Auf wiedersehen" and "Au revoir" clearly correspond to "Goodbye".
+1
level 76
Feb 10, 2017
Very small detail : In French, we put a space before double punctuation symbols (so : ; ! and ?), thus it should be "Comment allez-vous ?"
+1
level ∞
Feb 10, 2017
Weird. Changed it to that.
+1
level 76
Feb 11, 2017
Haha, I always find it weird that there is no space in English ;).
+1
level 33
May 18, 2017
In spanish sometimes we say "te veo despues"
+2
level 40
Nov 10, 2017
So, I've got one Thing bothering me: ''Tschüss'' would be a better fit for ''goodbye'' since we don't really say ''Auf Wiedersehen'' that often in Germany. We always say tschüss actually. And ''Bitteschön'' for ''You're welcome'' isn't wrong, but ''Gern geschehen'' would be better. Great quiz tho! :)
+1
level 18
Aug 15, 2018
I knew all of Spanish and most Italian, a few French, but had no idea on any of German
+1
level 55
Oct 24, 2018
"Au revoir" and "arrivederci" are exactly the same verbs used in the same ways. Both mean literally "see you later", but are used as greetings when you're leaving the other person. I think it's wrong that here are translated differently. As an Italian I suggest to use "arrivederci" for "goodbye" and translating "see you later" with "a dopo" (or "a più tardi" or "ci vediamo dopo").
+1
level 26
Jan 25, 2019
poor quiz, see you later section especially, most are goodbye transalations.