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Fastest Shrinking U.S. Cities

Name the American cities that have lost the most residents since the year 2000.
By city proper population. 2000-2017
Hint: Think manufacturing + crime
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: May 26, 2018
First submittedMay 26, 2018
Times taken6,328
Rating4.19
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Loss
City
278,166
Detroit
179,566
Chicago
92,878
Cleveland
91,382
New Orleans
39,563
Saint Louis
39,506
Baltimore
37,128
Toledo
34,036
Buffalo
32,156
Pittsburgh
Loss
City
32,110
Birmingham
29,984
Cincinnati
28,495
Flint
26,738
Gary
25,808
Dayton
19,228
Akron
17,422
Youngstown
17,291
Jackson, Mississippi
13,122
Saginaw
+9
level 76
May 27, 2018
So, what is it with Ohio??
+7
level 77
Jun 1, 2018
Jokes aside, I would venture to guess it has more to do with people moving out of city limits and into the suburbs than moving out of the state all together.
+3
level 57
Jul 25, 2018
I think there's a lot to that. Also the way cities are defined: My understanding is that Columbus draws the map to include suburbs, while Cleveland is just Cleveland proper. So the whole area is losing jobs, people move to the suburbs, the map (and tax base I assume) doesn't include suburbs, city loses more money plus more people etc.
+3
level 68
Jun 1, 2018
Everybody wants to move to Columbus, which is partially responsible for Columbus for being one of the fastest growing cities in the country.
+2
level 74
Aug 17, 2018
If they just went there first, they wouldn't think it's worth committing life to it.
+4
level 58
Aug 17, 2018
I'm a native Ohioan, born and raised an hour from Youngstown. The state, especially the eastern half, was built largely around the auto industry and steel mills. When Goodyear Tire left Akron in 1978 and Wheeling-Pittsburgh Steel filed bankruptcy in 1985 and again in 1990 (and never truly recovered), places like Akron, Youngstown, Cleveland, Dayton, and Toledo fell much in the way of Detroit, albeit less dramatically. Most of those cities are also ravaged by drug abuse, which raises their crime and poverty rates. This, of course, causes many to flee to other areas that are safer and more stable job-wise. Thankfully, Columbus is still thriving!
+1
level 66
Jun 14, 2018
Got them all but Youngstown, which I really should have remembered, and Toledo. Interesting how Gary is still shrinking so much, I was just there and it's already so hollowed out. Such an interesting, historic city.
+2
level 54
Jul 17, 2018
For most of these cities there's an elephant in the room, care to guess what one thing is that they all have in common?
+10
level 68
Aug 17, 2018
Relocation of industry, right? You didn't mean anything more racist/less historical than that, I trust.
+1
level 50
Aug 17, 2018
http://lmgtfy.com/?q=White+flight
+2
level 67
Aug 17, 2018
And don't forget about external events that might have caused people to leave the cities between 2000 and 2017, like in New Orleans and Flint.
+1
level 77
Aug 17, 2018
Hurricane Katrina was a significant factor; contaminated drinking water in Flint I'm sure wasn't.
+2
level 77
Aug 17, 2018
They're centered around dying industries?
+2
level 74
Aug 17, 2018
They all suck?
+2
level 80
Aug 17, 2018
All of the above?
+2
level 77
Aug 17, 2018
and in response to Quizmaster's hint: people don't move because of crime. They move mostly because of jobs. So manufacturing, yes. Crime, no.
+1
level 57
Aug 18, 2018
Ohio? High taxes. Those who can leave, do.
+1
level 43
Nov 2, 2019
By "elephant in the room" you mean the manhood size of a particular ethnic group? LOL
+2
level 41
Aug 17, 2018
What in the world is happening with Ohio? Maybe it has to do with the opioid situation. They are dying, not leaving.
+1
level 77
Aug 17, 2018
There were 3600 opioid deaths in Ohio in 2016, and many of these were by people who don't live in major cities.
+1
level 63
Aug 17, 2018
All but 4 of the 18 cities lost less than 40,000 people over 17 years. No city likes negative growth but that's hardly a mass exodus. That said, New Orleans was completely devastated by a natural disaster which explains a lot of their population loss. Manufacturing jobs being lost or moved internationally probably explains quite a bit of the rest.
+1
level 74
Jun 26, 2019
And several of those cities are under 100,000 people. Many have halved since the 1950s. Youngstown has lost 2/3 of it's population. St. Louis 856,000 in 1950 and soon to be in the 200s.
+1
level 66
Aug 17, 2018
It would have been good to include the populations being counted as a city. Saginaw seldom makes these lists because it is too small, so I didn't even consider it.
+1
level 77
Aug 17, 2018
If this was by urban area and not city proper I think the entire quiz might only be 2 or 3 entries long.
+1
level 51
Aug 20, 2018
Pick your random Blue city....