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First Names by Slang Meaning

We give you the slang meaning, you give us the first name.
Last updated: May 16, 2013
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Slang Meaning
Name
Coffee
Joe
To pry open
Jimmy
To vomit
Ralph
Earl
Detective
Dick
$100 bill
Benjamin
Viet-Cong soldier
Charlie
German soldier
Jerry
British soldier
Tommy
Slang Meaning
Name
British police officer
Bobby
Marijuana
Mary Jane
Prostitute's client
John
Drink laced with a drug
Mickey
Female equivalent to bloke (Australia)
Sheila
Victim of a con
Patsy
Mark
To throw away
Chuck
+3
level 50
Jun 25, 2013
Does Gerry work for a German soldier? Never heard of Earl, just hurl.
+4
level 26
Jun 28, 2013
My family always said "up-chuck" for vomit, so I put "chuck" and accidentally answered a different question. lol
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2019
Maybe he was trying to do semi-rhyming for "hurl"? (It doesn't really work for me either.)
+3
level 25
Jun 25, 2013
I do believe Spike is a valid name for a drink laced with drugs. And don't tell me Spike isn't a real name because if you do, the late Spike Milligan (sp?) will be turning in his grave.
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2019
Spike is the verb, not the drink.
+1
level 64
Jun 25, 2013
Should accept Ben $100 bill---that's all I've heard it called.
+1
level 75
Aug 7, 2014
Same here. I tried Ben and Franklin - never heard it called a Benjamin.
+4
level 77
Sep 9, 2016
Come on, it's all about the Benjamins
+1
level 68
Aug 5, 2018
Franklin's a first name too.
+2
level 40
Jun 29, 2013
What about Jay for the dope answer. It' the first thing I thought of.
+3
level 46
Apr 25, 2014
In Australia at least I've only heard Jay referring to a joint, not marijuana itself. I tried Bud though, that's a name isn't it?
+1
level 71
Sep 24, 2013
A German soldier could also be Fritz, couldn't it?
+1
level 81
May 29, 2014
No, it's Jerry. Though I couldn't remember it.
+1
level 77
Oct 31, 2015
In French, we say Fritz, but I don't know if it exists in English.
+1
level 69
Aug 18, 2018
Also called G√ľnther elsewhere in Europe.
+1
level 63
May 3, 2019
Yes, Fritz is used in English for a WW1 German soldier/s. At least I'm familiar with it having that meaning. I wasn't there at the time.
+2
level 54
Oct 16, 2013
also never heard earl used.
+2
level 55
May 22, 2014
Me neither.
+1
level 75
Aug 7, 2014
Never heard Ralph or Earl, but Hurl and Chuck I've heard of.
+1
level 69
Jan 17, 2015
I have never heard anyone say Earl when they mean Hurl. Also, Benjamin for $100. I have never heard. Sawbuck for $10 or Fin for $5, but Ben for $100? If someone asked me for a Ben I'd probably hand him a ballpoint.
+3
level 74
May 24, 2015
I think German soldiers have also been called "Fritz". And you should accept Herb for marijuana.
+1
level 72
Jul 25, 2015
Yes, in Europe they were called Fritz. And not only soldiers !
+1
level 68
Dec 11, 2018
Herb is one that works in Europe but not in America, due to differing pronunciations. In America, the H in Herb is pronounced in the name, but is silent when referring to a plant. Still, it make sense as an acceptable type-in since it works in British English.
+1
level 68
Aug 5, 2018
The instructions were pretty meaningless. I had to give up and see some answers to see what you were looking for.
+2
level 68
Aug 5, 2018
I think a Cockney saying 'url for hurl is obviously short pronunciation for what they know is hurl. Other than that, anyone who thinks it's Earl is just confused about the word they're hearing.
+1
level 75
Sep 15, 2018
Are you sure you don't mean "hurl" for "Earl"? I think you're confused because some people don't pronounce the h.
+1
level 68
Dec 11, 2018
I just created a similar quiz, not knowing about this one.
+1
level 70
Mar 30, 2019
The next time you update, you could add Nick for "to steal". British, but they need more respect. :-)