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Foods Named for Places

These foods are named after places. Fill in the blanks.
We are looking for a place name, or something that describes a place, such as "Japanese"
Last updated: March 25, 2015
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Description
Food
Ground beef sandwich
Hamburger
Hot dog
Frankfurter
Breakfast dish of fried, egg-soaked bread
French Toast
Chicken wings and sauce
Buffalo Wings
Spicy French mustard
Dijon Mustard
Ridiculously hot type of pepper
Scotch Bonnet
Sushi roll with crab, cucumber and avocado
California Roll
Steak and cheese in a bread roll
Philadelphia Cheese Steak
Puffy batter cooked in drippings
Yorkshire Pudding
Ice cream, sponge caked and meringue - baked in the oven
Baked Alaska
Chicken breast rolled around garlic butter, then breaded and fried
Chicken Kiev
Pastry filled with beef, potato, turnip and onion
Cornish Pasty
Roast duck with crispy skin
Peking Duck
Egg yolk and butter sauce
Hollandaise Sauce
Chocolate cake with pecan-coconut frosting
German Chocolate Cake
Large, deep-pocket waffles usually served with whip cream
Belgian Waffles
Milk or cream-based chowder that definitely doesn't use tomatoes
New England Clam Chowder
Steamed, beef hot dog with a poppyseed bun, lots of toppings but not ketchup
Chicago-style Hot Dog
Cocktail with 5 different liquors
Long Island Ice Tea
Melted cheese poured over toast
Welsh Rarebit
Omelette with diced ham, onion and peppers
Denver Omelette
Cake with custard filling and chocolate frosting
Boston Cream Pie
+1
level 59
Nov 4, 2012
It's supposed to be Welsh Rabbit, not Rarebit.
+4
level 10
Nov 7, 2012
it's definately rarebit...do your research before commenting.
+1
level 47
Apr 15, 2014
Wikipedia is your friend. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_rarebit . Rabbit far predates rarebit. Doesn't everyone knew that rarebit is a bastardization of rabbit?
+1
level 67
Nov 6, 2016
Never an insult to the Welsh: ......According to the Oxford English Dictionary, 'Welsh rarebit' is an "etymologizing alteration. There is no evidence of the independent use of rarebit". The word rarebit has no other use than in Welsh rabbit. "Eighteenth-century English cookbooks reveal that it was then considered to be a luscious supper or tavern dish, based on the fine cheddar-type cheeses and the wheat breads. Surprisingly, it seems there was not only a Welsh Rabbit, but also an English Rabbit, an Irish and a Scotch Rabbit, but nary a rarebit" Michael Quinion writes: "Welsh rabbit is basically cheese on toast (the word is not 'rarebit' by the way, that's the result of false etymology; 'rabbit' is here being used in the same way as 'turtle' in 'mock-turtle soup', which has never been near a turtle, or 'duck' in 'Bombay duck', which was actually a dried fish called bummalo)'
+1
level 54
Nov 6, 2016
🔥🔥🔥
+1
level 35
Dec 28, 2017
It's definitely both: they're alternative names.
+2
level 50
Nov 4, 2012
I think Welsh Rarebit is correct. The problem is with Cornish Pastry. It reads "Cornish Pasty".
+4
level 28
Nov 4, 2012
Rarebit is correct and so is pasty. It is not pastry. History of Pasty - Cornish Pasty
+2
level 56
Nov 4, 2012
Actually that's correct, it's called a pasty.
+5
level 43
Jun 2, 2015
haha i'm guessing you're not British? cant beat a good pasty
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2012
You ought to accept Beijing for Peking duck. Since the city has more accurately and commonly been called Beijing duck, more and more people call the dish by this name too.
+3
level 29
Nov 9, 2012
no, they don't.
+1
level 73
Aug 12, 2013
Never heard of Beijing Duck. And if my Chinese take out menu in my desk drawer says "Peking Duck", I'm going to say that the Chinese still say Peking Duck.
+1
level 22
Jun 1, 2015
Er. No we don't. Peking is a word only the western people use.
+1
level 67
Mar 19, 2014
I agree, in Beijing it's called Beijing duck.
+3
level 65
Jun 1, 2015
No, it's not. It's called Peking duck on every English-language menu I've seen there.
+1
level 67
Apr 17, 2018
'friendz'........What is your source for 'Beijing Duck' it was recently Peking Roast Duck in Beijing Restaurants.
+3
level 50
Jul 6, 2014
So a man and his wife go to a Chinese restaurant and order Chicken Surprise. When the dish gets there, the man reaches to serve himself, and the lid rises up. Two beady eyes look around, then the lid slams down again. He asks his wife if she saw it. She hadn't, so she reached toward it. Again, two beady little eyes peek out. Perturbed, they call the waiter and demand an explanation. He asks what they ordered. "Chicken Surprise", they say. He says, "Oh. I am very sorry. I brought you Peking Duck!"
+1
level 59
May 31, 2015
Assume the punch line should really be "Peeking Duck"!
+1
level ∞
Mar 25, 2015
I guess there's no harm in allowing Beijing.
+1
level 38
Mar 1, 2017
That's hogwash! - The city may have changed its name, the dish hasn't!
+1
level 77
May 8, 2018
The dish is called "beijing kaoya" in Mandarin, but I don't think I've ever heard it called "Beijing duck" in English. Then again, I don't look at the English side of the menu in Chinese restaurants nearly as much as I used to. Since there's not another dish called "Beijing duck" in English, I agree with QM that there doesn't seem to be any harm in allowing it.
+1
level 52
Nov 4, 2012
Fun quiz and did ok- some things I'd never heard of and a couple I don't fancy trying! But I have had a Cornish Pasty in Cornwall and they're yummy!!!
+1
level 20
Nov 4, 2012
Never heard of Frankfurter
+1
level 42
Aug 11, 2014
Americans only started calling them 'hot dogs' during WW1 to downplay any association with the Germans. I'm not sure if anyone actually called sauerkraut 'liberty cabbage', though.
+1
level 65
Jun 1, 2015
Yeah - we learn that in German history books. With everything that happened, changing the name of a sausage was what really demoralised us.
+1
level 67
Sep 10, 2016
Not to mention that hamburg(er) was changed to Salisbury steak. It's still fatty, ground beef.
+1
level 58
Nov 5, 2012
Chicken Kiev is more than simple breaded chicken cutlet. The problem with labeling it such is that in Italian cuisine, a piece of breaded chicken cutlet is known as chicken Milanese, which in itself is named after the city of Milan.
+1
level 44
Aug 2, 2014
Yes and Chicken Parmesan also employs the breaded chicken cutlet. Clue should be more specific.
+2
level 29
Nov 5, 2012
German chocolate cake was not named after Germany, but after it's creator, Sam German.
+1
level 44
Aug 2, 2014
Nice debunking there.
+1
level 70
May 9, 2017
I was about to say the same thing.
+1
level 15
Nov 13, 2012
You would think i would get the Cornish Pasty one as i'm from Cornwall... But no, i didn't think any thing of it!
+1
level 53
Apr 8, 2013
What makes Chicken Kiev would be the Garlic Butter, not just breaded chicken
+1
level 75
Oct 20, 2013
I was going to make this quiz... decided to do a search before making it, though, and it's already here. I would have included Key Lime Pie and Champagne, and the clue I would have given for Frankfurter would have been "sausage in a bun" or something like that.
+1
level 39
Jan 30, 2015
A frankfurter in a bun is called a hot dog.
+1
level 75
May 31, 2015
There should be enough to do another quiz, although they may not be as obvious or may be brand names - Turkish Delight or Turkish Taffy, French fries, Philadelphia Cream Cheese, Swiss cheese, Neapolitan ice cream, Danish pastry, etc.
+2
level 65
Jun 1, 2015
But it's called a frankfurter regardless of whether or not it's in a bun!
+1
level 75
Jun 1, 2015
Fair point, dg. Helen.. you sure about that? I've been served plenty of hot dogs with no buns, and frankfurters in buns.
+1
level 54
Apr 16, 2015
I hate to be the one to do it, but German Chocolate Cake is named after Sam German, not Germany, so it's not named after a place.
+1
level 70
May 9, 2017
True
+1
level 58
May 31, 2015
They call me slim pasty
+1
level 72
May 31, 2015
93% guessed a French Toast. I didn't. And I'm French. Really don't know what it can be. Maybe "pain perdu", but it's not for breakfast, and not specially french (german, belgian too). Maybe"oeufs au plat", but it's for breakfast in England really more than in France... I suppose 7% people trying this quizz are French too !
+1
level 67
May 31, 2015
In Canada, French Toast en français is called Pain doré.
+1
level 59
May 31, 2015
I only know about French Toast because of the scene in Kramer vs Kramer when Dustin Hoffman has to make breakfast for his son for the first time and it's a disaster. In the UK there used to be a product of dry pre-toasted bread which we called French Toast (it's a more common breakfast food in Europe, I think, but under different names).
+1
level 65
Jun 1, 2015
C'est une version un peu américanisée du pain perdu - j'imagine qu'ils ajoutent du sucre, de l'huile et du ketchup...
+1
level 72
May 23, 2016
Pur cauchemar !
+1
level 68
Mar 10, 2017
Errrr, no...eggs & milk mixed together. Bread dunked in mixture & fried in a pan w/lots of butter. Served w/(in my house) *real* maple syrup, or Nutella (that's my daughter's version). No sugar, no oil, no ketchup (or catsup).
+1
level 61
Jun 2, 2015
add sugar, oil and ketchup - that just sounds vile.
+1
level 17
Jun 4, 2015
i think you should put Arizona Iced Tea
+1
level 49
Jul 27, 2015
delicious, i am hungry now. :)
+1
level 74
May 11, 2016
Black Forest Cake :)
+1
level 80
May 24, 2016
Seriously, German Chocolate Cake is named after a person not a place. Please remove it.
+1
level 70
May 9, 2017
Black Forest Cake would be a suitable replacement I believe.
+1
level 60
Sep 5, 2017
Nope. Different cake.
+1
level 27
Dec 30, 2016
In Southeast Alaska baked alaska often means halibut topped in a sauce of mayonnaise, onion, and other not particularly delicious things. Never heard of this other thing in the clue and I'm from SE alaska and live in the interior of Alaska currently.
+1
level 70
Jul 5, 2017
I love New England clam chowder, but am usually dissatisfied with how little clam is in it. So I keep a couple of cans of chopped clams around to add to my chowder. Problem solved! Mmmmm....
+1
level 60
Sep 5, 2017
I remembered this quiz as I was eating a delicious piece of cake and wondered what it might be called in English. There is no actual English translation for "Russischer Zupfkuchen" but you can find it on the internet as Russian Chocolate (Covered) Cheesecake. A more literal translation would be Russian Pluck-Cake.
+1
level 52
Oct 10, 2018
Pluck....the heart, liver, and lungs of an animal as food.... not sure how that would go covered in chocolate
+1
level 38
Dec 10, 2017
freedom fries (french fries); salisbury steak (hamburger), hot dog (frankfurter). How will we ever be able to have success on a quiz if the "correct" answers keep changing to satisfy unconscious (or perhaps quite conscious) insecurities of the politically correct mob.
+2
level 63
Apr 17, 2018
You could have added "Food between two slices of bread" - Sandwich.
+1
level 49
Apr 17, 2018
Can you put huge disclaimers on quizzes such as these, such as "This is highly American-centric" ?
+1
level 59
May 20, 2018
sigh.
+1
level 34
May 15, 2018
Yorkshire puddings are cooked in dripping (fat from roasted meat), not "drippings" (which makes it sound like the chef is sweating profusely).
+1
level 55
Feb 15, 2019
It's cool that wiener is accepted as an alternative answer