Foods that Start with H

Based on a picture, can you guess these foods and drinks that start with the letter H?
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Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: August 9, 2020
First submittedAugust 30, 2012
Times taken61,715
Rating3.72
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Hazelnut
Huckleberry
British delicacy
naval food
Chinese soup
Native American
usually grated
two eyes on the same side
the sauce
+5
Level 60
Dec 10, 2015
This is the most popular quiz I have ever seen with one answer with 100%.
+2
Level 65
Apr 23, 2017
Got all I could have. Never heard of seven of these.
+3
Level 35
Jul 27, 2018
My father used to call them filberts too.
+1
Level 56
Sep 27, 2020
I heard that the filbert industry changed the name to hazelnut for marketing reasons. People found the name hazelnut more appealing than filbert. They grow them here in Oregon, and when I was a kid we called them filberts, too.
+2
Level 70
Aug 10, 2020
Hot and sour soup, not really known as that surely, you could have 'Hot potato'....... 'Hot meat pie'...... etcc.
+1
Level 79
Aug 10, 2020
I doubt the version served in the US is "authentic," but it's always called "Hot and Sour Soup," for obvious reasons.
+6
Level 72
Sep 27, 2020
In Chinese, it is 酸辣汤 or “Sour and Spicy Soup”, so the translation isn’t that bad & that name is used fairly consistently across the United States. Having had it on both sides of the Pacific, I can say that the authenticity can vary within the US, but most places will have the correct basic ingredients & general flavors
+19
Level 65
Aug 10, 2020
British Scottish 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿
+3
Level 83
Aug 10, 2020
I'm American but I completely agree with skoldpadda: Scottish!
+1
Level 89
Sep 27, 2020
Technically, "British" does refer to the United Kingdom. But in the spirit of fairness, Haggis is Scottish.
+1
Level 69
Sep 28, 2020
Aye, tis true
+3
Level 79
Aug 10, 2020
Good grief, could they make haggis look any less appealing? Lacking any testimonials as to how utterly delicious it is, I don't think I could attempt to eat a single forkful. That just looks so nasty.
+4
Level 71
Aug 10, 2020
You don't normally see it with the skin on (in my experience) which makes it look a good deal better - and it is very tasty indeed.
+2
Level 72
Sep 27, 2020
With the skin on, it looks like a monster from John Carpenter’s “The Thing”
+2
Level 80
Sep 27, 2020
Looks as gross as it sounds. Gag.
+1
Level 79
Sep 27, 2020
I always think of it as a giant sausage, which I guess it sort of is. I would try it if I had the chance.
+3
Level 67
Sep 28, 2020
Not the best picture to be sure, but they are delicious. Perhaps quizmaster could find a pic of a living specimen, with its legs longer on one side, so that it can run around the steep hills of the Scottish highlands without falling over. Very cute, but easily caught by turning them around so they roll down the hills to the waiting huntsmen.
+1
Level 71
Sep 29, 2020
DonTheLamplighter, have you read Green Eggs and Ham?
+1
Level 71
Oct 6, 2020
See, I've always been taught to rub salt on their tails so they run round in circles to lick it off. Once they've started they can't stop (because their legs are longer on one side) so you can easily catch them.
+2
Level 51
Sep 27, 2020
I did not know that huckleberries really existed
+2
Level 80
Sep 27, 2020
I'll be your huckleberry
+1
Level 78
Sep 29, 2020
Great film! ;)
+1
Level 68
Sep 27, 2020
Yup! They're closely-related, and very similar, to blueberries.
+1
Level 79
Sep 27, 2020
If you drive through the Pacific Northwest of the US during summer, you'll see signs everywhere for huckleberry pie.
+2
Level 80
Sep 27, 2020
I tried "heartichoke" for the habaneros. They look kind of heart-shaped. I think that would be a better name.
+1
Level 43
Sep 27, 2020
Gonna be honest, I only got huckleberries because of Doc Holliday in Tombstone.

"I'm your huckleberry".

+1
Level 54
Sep 27, 2020
Never heard of the Native American "Bean"? but everyday is a school day. Happy I got all the rest
+3
Level 79
Sep 27, 2020
Hominy is kernels of dried field corn that have gone through the process of nixtamalization which loosens the outer husks. I made it once with my grandmother who poured water through wood ashes to make lye water for soaking the kernels. After they swelled we had to wash and wash and wash and wash it, and then wash it again, slipping off the outer husks with our hands as we washed the kernels. It takes a lot of time and work to make hominy by hand. We decided it was much easier to buy it in the can, or dried and ground as hominy grits.
+1
Level 36
Sep 29, 2020
Hominy is delicious and soft with a texture kind of like....chickpeas. My family likes to have it in soups!
+1
Level 48
Sep 27, 2020
I didn't know six of these. Definitely Scottish because it's extremely difficult to buy haggis anywhere else. But then you can't buy some of these other foods either in England.
+2
Level 18
Sep 27, 2020
I only got Hardtack because a friend made it for a gaming night, I hope as a joke. I think he got the recipe from how tiles were made for the space shuttle, quite durable.
+4
Level 79
Sep 27, 2020
This was an easy one for me. We've grown eight of these on our farm - ham, hazelnuts, habaneros, honeydew, field corn for hominy, honey, horseradish, and huckleberries - although the hazelnuts didn't survive the first year, and we grew garden huckleberries which aren't the same as regular huckleberries. (We didn't care for the garden huckleberries which are a member of the nightshade family. They didn't have much flavor but they produced well.) We grow blueberries which are much closer to real huckleberries. We've also made brats from our meat which is close to hot dogs but not the same.
+1
Level 47
Sep 28, 2020
I got hardtack from watching too many MRE reviews............
+3
Level 53
Sep 28, 2020
Were I the only one trying Halle for the berry question ? ;)