Take another quiz >

French Foods

Based on the descriptions, name these popular French foods.
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
First submittedMay 18, 2014
Last updatedMay 26, 2014
Times taken19,365
Rating3.72
4:00
Enter answer here
0
 / 20 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Description
Food
Thin pancake
Crêpe
French word for French fries
Frites
Custard topped with a thin crust
of burned sugar
Crème Brûlée
Communal pot of melted cheese
Fondue
Soup with a meat and onion base,
topped with cheese
French Onion
Almond sponge cake
remembered fondly by Proust
Madeleine
Elongated loaf of French bread
Baguette
Spreadable meat product,
often made with liver
Pâté
Fattened goose liver
Foie gras
Cooked snails
Escargot
Description
Food
Flaky, buttery, crescent-shaped pastry
Croissant
French sausage popular in Cajun cuisine
Andouille
Beaten eggs folded around a filling
Omelette
Popular soft cheese of Normandy
(hint: starts with C)
Camembert
Flaky pastry with dark chocolate inside
Pain au Chocolat
Salad with tomatoes and hard-boiled eggs
named after the city of Nice
Salad Niçoise
Emulsion of oil, egg yolks, and vinegar
Mayonnaise
Very similar to the above, but with garlic
Aioli
Stewed vegetable dish of Provence
(and subject of a Disney movie)
Ratatouille
Ganache between
almond meringue cookies
Macaron
+3
level 84
May 18, 2014
This just made me hungry.
+3
level 71
May 25, 2014
I missed Aioli, I've heard the word before but I don't think I've ever eaten any so I never thought of it. Blanked out on "pain au chocolat" as well.... in Québec we always call those a "chocolatine" and when that didn't work I just stared at my screen out of ideas.
+4
level 62
May 25, 2014
The word "chocolatine" is often used to call the "pain au chocolat" in the South of France as well.
+2
level ∞
May 26, 2014
That one will work now.
+4
level 43
Jan 28, 2016
One says France is divided in two parts : the pain au chocolat part and the chocolatine part.
+2
level 60
Jun 28, 2017
and in Belgium the "couque au chocolat"
+3
level 33
May 25, 2014
Change the wording of the last hint please! I was trying to name the filling, not the entire cookie.
+2
level 60
Nov 26, 2016
Yes. The Macaron refers to the meringue part - not the filling.
+1
level 52
Mar 3, 2017
+1
+1
level 71
Jul 20, 2019
I had no idea that “macaron” did not refer to the entire assembled sandwich, but looking it up, I see y’all are correct.I am a frequent and avid consumer of them, so I feel like a dolt. (Are any of you French bakers? May I please have some free macarons? 🤗) But at least I did know that ganache is not necessarily the only traditional filling; buttercream and jam are just as common, at least in the US. Quizmaster, how about something like, “An almond meringue cookie served sandwich-style with filling”?
+1
level 25
May 26, 2014
French fries are popular in Belgian cuisine, not in the French one
+2
level 43
Jan 28, 2016
They are popular in french cuisine as well, despite the belgian origins.
+1
level 77
May 7, 2016
They are popular pretty much everywhere. As much flak as Americans get for popularizing fast food, I used to think it was mostly an American thing, but since moving overseas I've seen this isn't true at all. If anything the rest of the world likes fries way more than Americans do.
+1
level ∞
Mar 20, 2017
I found it very difficult to order that didn't involve french fries when I was in Ireland.
+1
level 36
May 26, 2014
Ayako says this quiz is stupid
+2
level 76
May 27, 2014
Oh, so that's what's in mayo. I thought it came from a Mayo bush. Or the legendary Mayo fish.
+2
level ∞
May 27, 2014
Haha. Can you imagine if there were a mayo fish? We'd have fished that thing to extinction long ago!
+1
level 67
Oct 26, 2015
I had a French friend who made Mayonnaise with wine vinegar and Dijon mustard............ boy was it good.
+2
level 45
May 28, 2014
Got them all. Thanks NYT Dining section! :-)
+1
level 71
Jul 20, 2019
Username checks out!

Oh, wait… it says nycBARB, not nycCARB. My bad.

+1
level 45
May 28, 2014
I have never put meat in my "onion soup"
+1
level 76
Feb 4, 2015
It contains meat stock. At least, mine does.
+1
level 75
Apr 18, 2016
Meat is an overstatement for beef stock.
+1
level 2
Jun 7, 2014
Indeed, no meat in a French "soupe a l'oignon"
+4
level 2
Jun 7, 2014
A macaron can have different kind of fillings .... ganache, buttercream, etc.
+2
level 23
Jun 14, 2014
Fondue is swiss
+1
level 43
Jan 28, 2016
Not the one eaten in France.
+3
level 48
Sep 16, 2014
Shouldn't boudin also be accepted for a French sausage popular in Cajun cooking?
+2
level 76
Feb 10, 2015
1+
+1
level 43
Jan 28, 2016
Boudin is not really a sausage.
+2
level 77
Jun 20, 2018
Of course it is. It is specifically sausage.
+2
level 56
Jun 17, 2019
Hear, hear
+6
level 36
Feb 25, 2015
I got macaron because I was going to type macaroni for no reason.
+4
level 65
Jun 20, 2015
you are my idol
+2
level 43
Jan 28, 2016
+1
+1
level 77
May 7, 2016
Fun fact: most people cannot tell the difference between pate and common cat food.
+4
level 63
Jan 4, 2019
I bet the common cat can.
+1
level 38
May 25, 2018
Please add croquet monsieur, it's a very highly treasured part of French cuisine.
+4
level 79
Jul 12, 2018
Are you sure it's not a highly treasured part of French lawn gaming?
+4
level 39
Jul 17, 2018
...croque monsieur, also croque madame...
+1
level 52
Jul 14, 2018
Kalba, have you tested the 'cat food' theory?
+2
level 52
Jul 14, 2018
cornflakesfu, nice comment : )
+3
level 76
Aug 4, 2018
I did a facepalm when I saw "Pain au Chocolat" for the pastry with chocolate. Seriously? That's just a description of what it is! I could have guessed that if I hadn't assumed that they were more creative/less lazy with the name!
+1
level 52
Aug 14, 2018
French food is better than italian food
+3
level 52
Nov 19, 2018
surely the French do not call their soup 'French Onion' ??
+1
level 42
Feb 24, 2019
No, we call it "soupe à l'oignon", or onion soup in english (very complex haha)
+1
level 38
Aug 18, 2019
I have a cousin who was born in France and her French Onion soup is quite a production. She starts the process a day in advance, by slowly boiling down left over beefsteak. Then, on the day that it is being served, she strains it to remove whatever morsels of meat may be left, adds onions and other seasonings and simmers that for about an hour. The final product tastes delicious! (by the way adding croutons and cheese is, I believe, an American addition). The first time I asked about the cheese, she gave me withering stare, plunked down a hunk of french bread and told me to "eat"!
+1
level 42
Feb 24, 2019
TEAM CHOCOLATINE
+1
level 57
May 2, 2019
I find it mildly annoying that most type-ins are just poor spelling versions of the thing, and having to delete most word endings.
+2
level 56
Jun 17, 2019
Folks have suggested "chocolatine" for "flaky pastry with chocolate inside," I'd also suggest "eclair" and "profiterole" aka "pate a choux."
+1
level 71
Jul 20, 2019
Are you suggesting adding eclair or profiterole (aka cream puff) as the answer to a new question? Because I don’t see how any of the things you list could be a synonym for pain au chocolat. Pâte a choux refers only to the (non-yeast) dough used to make an eclair (which is log-shaped) or a cream puff (round) – and it cooks up chewy, not flaky like the yeasty dough used for pain au chocolat. Both eclairs and cream puffs are filled with a pastry cream, not chocolate. Pouring chocolate on top is optional on a cream puff, but standard on an eclair.

Source: retired relative that got into French baking, but hates almonds and thus doesn’t make macarons, much to my eternal chagrin.