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French Place Words Quiz

Below you will see a bunch of French words for places. Enter their English translations.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 5, 2017
First submittedSeptember 4, 2017
Times taken8,008
Rating4.14
4:00
Enter English translation here:
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French
English
Ville
City
Île
Island
Pont
Bridge
Mer
Sea
Fleuve
River
Plage
Beach
Côte
Coast
Rue
Street
French
English
Banlieue
Suburbs
Boulangerie
Bakery
Église
Church
Marché
Market
Musée
Museum
Maison
House
Lac
Lake
Salon
Living Room
French
English
École
School
Piscine
Pool
Stade
Stadium
Pays
Country
Jardin
Garden
Palais
Palace
Magasin
Shop
Gare
Station
+2
level 84
Sep 4, 2017
I think the last clue is a typo? Station is Gare.
+3
level ∞
Sep 4, 2017
Fixed, thanks
+1
level 62
Jan 17, 2019
i wonder what it originally said, was it stadion? I so i would ve gotten the last one I missed... I thought a allready typed station, but it was stadion (for stadium) that I had tried..
+1
level 64
Sep 4, 2017
I am no Native speaker but I am pretty sure that 1) salon has several possible meanings, first of all lounge, and 2) living room is rather "salle de dejour".
+4
level 73
Sep 4, 2017
It is "salle de séjour", but salon and salle de séjour are generally the same room, if you don't live in a castle !
+3
level 71
Sep 6, 2017
The definition of a "lounge" was never completely clear in my mind, but I'm fairly sure that what English-speakers would call a lounge is not something we'd ever call a "salon" in French. As for a "salle de séjour", the majority of regular homes don't have one; the "salon" is what you call the main common room of the house, the place where you have your sofas, TV and fireplace (if you have one) and as far as I know that's what the English "living room" is. The only other widespread meaning for "salon" that I can think of is for, like, "le Salon du livre" or "le Salon de l'habitation", in which "Salon" is kind of at once an event and the place where it takes place - normally a large open indoor venue. I'm not sure there is a single English translation for that meaning though... I believe "Salon du livre" would be a book fair, while my local "Salon de l'habitation" calls itself "National Home Show" on its English webpage.
+2
level 65
Feb 21, 2018
I'm English, and to me, lounge and living room are synonyms.
+1
level 46
Mar 1, 2018
AVB That must be the difference between British and American English, then. I've never heard a living room referred to as a lounge here in America. To us, a lounge is a break room for employees at a workplace, or an exclusive club-type thing that's got a bar and really comfortable chairs/sofas, where there's usually live entertainment and a lot of smoking. No one in America has a lounge in their home (except for maybe REALLY rich people).
+1
level 71
Sep 6, 2017
Sorry, silly me, I forgot another obvious meaning of "salon" as in "salon de beauté" or "de coiffure", but in those cases I believe it would have been the same word in English - beauty salon or hairdresser's salon.
+2
level 58
Feb 21, 2018
Who says 'salle de dejour'? You'd go a long time waiting to hear that. Lived in France for years, nobody says that. Salon is living room, lounge, front room, sitting room. And lounge and living room are the same thing - I'm English and call the room I'm in the lounge, my American wife calls this same room living room.
+2
level 55
Feb 21, 2018
I live in France and, being also a frequent flyer, I definitely second the first point: in every French airport there are bilingual signs directing business class passengers to "the lounge" and "le salon". Lounge should be a correct answer.
+3
level 77
Feb 21, 2018
I just put "room" and I got it...
+2
level 73
Sep 4, 2017
The spelling is "banlieue". French language is the champion of useless letters !
+1
level ∞
Sep 5, 2017
Lol. Fixed.
+3
level 71
Sep 16, 2017
English sure has a lot of useless letters though, too. The French extra letters are just nicer letters, like e and u. We have all those ugly g's and h's
+1
level 35
Feb 21, 2018
and english??? with K (i dont know, knife) and few other letters
+1
level 84
Sep 4, 2017
Would Ville not also be a town?
+1
level ∞
Sep 5, 2017
Yes
+1
level 68
Sep 5, 2017
Swimming pool should be accepted for "piscine", I put it in and then realised but if somebody put that in and it wasn't accepted, they may assume it's wrong.
+1
level ∞
Sep 5, 2017
That will work now. Thanks.
+1
level 77
Sep 5, 2017
Google Translate says that the French translation of the English word "saloon" is "salon". Presumably, that means that "saloon" is a permissible English translation of the French word "salon".
+3
level 71
Sep 6, 2017
I would perhaps take Google Translate with a grain of salt here. As a French-speaker, I can say there is nothing that is called "salon" in French that I would translate as "saloon" in English. Although I will admit that besides the far-west type of saloon, I have no idea what would be called a saloon in English nowadays.
+2
level 72
Sep 7, 2017
Totally agree. Google Translate is the worst translation tool ever, with the exception of random guesswork!
+2
level 71
Sep 16, 2017
*Grain* of salt? One should take Google Translate with an entire salt MINE. Or possibly the Salar de Uyuni.
+1
level 67
Feb 22, 2018
Don't just grumble and pick fault, name a better translation tool.
+1
level 76
Sep 16, 2018
^ The problem with Google Translate isn't necessarily that it's bad, it's that so many people use it as if it isn't.
+3
level 78
Sep 10, 2017
Côte has several meanings in French. Coast is one of them, but it can also mean rib and slope, and the latter one can indeed be a place name. Land should also be accepted for pays, and maybe arena for stade. To translate Fleuve into river is always a problem, because fleuve is specifically a river that reaches the sea, and it seems there is no word for that in English! The French word for river is rivière.
+1
level 73
Feb 21, 2018
I agree with you for Côte/Slope. Hill and Shore should also be accepted. I have no problem, however, with Fleuve/River, as there is indeed no other possible translation in English for that word.
+1
level 64
Feb 21, 2018
I agree with Côte. In addition, it can also mean cuesta in English, though that's probably really obscure for anyone not studying geology. The French Wikipedia article for Fleuve has the article for Main stem as its English counterpart.
+1
level 70
Sep 15, 2017
Salon threw me - knew it meant living room, but given the nature of the other answers, I kept trying different things, thinking it had another meaning.
+2
level 65
Jan 20, 2018
salon also means hall! "le salon des miroirs" in versailles. also why not accept "road" for rue?
+1
level 61
Feb 21, 2018
the french word for road is route ..
+1
level 67
Feb 22, 2018
The "salon des miroirs" is the same salon that means lounge or living room or drawing room or whatever you call that, a place to relax that is not for sleeping, eating, or cooking. The hall in a house is "le couloir", the hall in a convention centre is either "la salle" or "le hall".
+1
level 60
Feb 21, 2018
Banlieue is surely a singular word, so would not the singular English answer be correct?
+2
level 71
Feb 21, 2018
Very, very pedantically, and outdatedly, 'suburbs' is a singular word (Latin urbs = city).
+1
level 64
Feb 21, 2018
Works for me.
+1
level 67
Feb 22, 2018
French is very strange in that "banlieue" is very rarely pluralized, so you can have "Clichy est une banlieue de Paris" but also "je préfère la vie dans la campagne à celle dans la banlieue"
+2
level 59
Feb 21, 2018
Living room is a lounge or sitting room in English too
+1
level 74
Feb 21, 2018
There are numerous possible translations for 'salon',
+1
level 49
Feb 21, 2018
I got everything with 3:04 left. Maybe the fact I'm French might have helped... Maybe !
+1
level 45
Feb 21, 2018
Magasin means mall, not shop. Shop is 'boutique'.
+1
level 67
Feb 22, 2018
It definitely does not mean mall, a mall is "un centre commercial". A boutique, just as in English, means a small, usually upscale shop, and a magasin is just a retail establishment.
+1
level 36
Feb 21, 2018
In my French class, I learned that banlieue is a neighborhood.
+1
level 67
Feb 22, 2018
Banlieue literally means suburb. Use "quartier" for neighborhood. If you come out of a metro stop in Paris or Lyon you will see a board called "plan du quartier"—neighborhood map. If you're talking about a neighborhood as literally a collection of neighbors, "un voisinage".
+1
level 59
Feb 21, 2018
Baker's for bakery?
+1
level 58
Feb 21, 2018
How about accepting "castle" for "palais"? Palace and castle are synonymous.
+1
level 58
Feb 21, 2018
I think "château" is really better for "castle" than "palace"
+1
level 42
Feb 21, 2018
Palace and Castle aren't synonyms...Palace is the official residence of somebody important like a bishop or a queen (like Buckingham Palace) while castle is a large building that's built for battle and to withstand attacks
+1
level 49
Feb 21, 2018
Oh la la
+1
level 38
Apr 6, 2018
I thought that the "salon" would be the living room, while the "lounge" would translate into family room (the less formal gathering place where tv's, stereos, board games,etc are played or where one just "lounges around").
+1
level 52
Oct 15, 2018
nice... if you have a big enough house to have all those extra room. like the Dining room, the Sitting room, the Front Parlour, the Den, the Games room, the Bar, the Office, the Sewing room etc ad infinitum
+1
level 38
Aug 17, 2019
Oh, please! You don't have to live in a mansion to have both a salon and a lounge. Many houses, especially those recently built, but also older ones, include both (one as a formal living room, the other as a "day" room, a family room or a basement recreation room).
+2
level 51
Jul 15, 2018
Can bakers not be accepted for bakery?
+1
level 62
Jan 17, 2019
there can be several bakers in one bakery, it is not about the person
+1
level 79
Feb 18, 2019
izzywhizz28 probably means baker's i.e. baker's shop as in "I bought the bread at the baker's".
+1
level 62
Jan 17, 2019
Nearly gotten them all, didnt get gare while it was what I thought it was, just thought I had allready tried it... and got banlieu at a complete guess. Getting magasin right was a bit of a struggle. As other probably will also have tried, tried magasin first. Then I started to remember the right direction, but thought warehouse... (in my language a similar word mean a big storage place for shops and bussinesses. so also tried storage)
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