General Knowledge Quiz #20

Answer these random trivia questions.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: June 18, 2018
First submittedNovember 24, 2011
Times taken68,583
Rating3.91
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Question
Answer
What is the world's most famous sled dog race?
The Iditarod
What country is Justin Bieber from?
Canada
Who sang "Happy Birthday, Mr. President" to John F. Kennedy?
Marilyn Monroe
What volcano destroyed the city of Pompeii?
Mount Vesuvius
Who requested sharks with frickin' laser beams?
Dr. Evil
What is also referred to as a horn of plenty?
Cornucopia
What TV show featured the Holodeck?
Star Trek: The Next Generation
What is 12345 + 12345?
24690
Who built a wall to separate Scotland and England?
Hadrian
What nut is a typical ingredient in pesto?
Pine Nut
What does a cobbler make and repair?
Shoes
What is a word that means "island chain"?
Archipelago
What part of animal is suet?
Fat
What major fault line runs through California?
San Andreas Fault
What King was beheaded during the English Civil War?
Charles I
Who wrote the musicals the "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Evita"?
Andrew Lloyd Webber
What title does someone gain when they are knighted?
Sir or Dame
Which borough of New York City starts with Q?
Queens
In what movie did the main character bend over backwards, dodging bullets
as if they were moving in slow motion?
The Matrix
U2 is a band. What is a U-2?
an Airplane
+2
Level 44
Oct 8, 2013
Only 41 percent of the test takers know about the Iditarod! Sad. Maybe they just couldn't spell it.
+3
Level 63
Oct 8, 2013
That would be my guess. I tried about ten different ways before Googling it. Which is not cheating (see: The Shia LaBeouf Rule)
+2
Level 87
Jun 18, 2018
I don't think Iditarod qualifies. It is spelt exactly as it sounds.
+4
Level 82
Jul 24, 2018
Yep. Eyedituhrawd. Exactly as it sounds.
+1
Level 47
Aug 17, 2018
May I ask what the Shia LaBeouf Rule is?
+1
Level 61
Aug 21, 2018
I would guess if you know an answer but just can't spell it, and you can't get close enough that your answer is accepted, you can look up the spelling without penalty. The same as verbal answers are accepted on Jeopardy even if the contestant couldn't spell the word to save his life.
+1
Level 63
Nov 29, 2013
I tried about a dozen ways of spelling it and couldn't get it right.
+2
Level 15
Dec 16, 2013
word.
+3
Level 52
Jul 13, 2018
I knew it right off. Not knowing it is not sad. You are sad, Sir Pompous.
+5
Level 49
Aug 16, 2018
Just didn't know. Sorry to be a peasant in your kingdom of your pointless dog racing knowledge.
+1
Level 44
May 28, 2020
This is a quiz site. Most of the stuff on here is supposed to be useless knowledge.
+1
Level 81
Aug 16, 2018
Visually it always reminds me of the word idiot.
+1
Level 44
May 28, 2020
Only 29% now
+1
Level 83
May 16, 2014
Damn you Spanish! I tried Saint Andreas and St Andreas and even Sint Andreas. Of course it's San Andreas. Bwah.
+1
Level 35
Aug 16, 2018
"Sint" is Dutch, by the way.
+1
Level 81
Aug 16, 2018
Sanka is coffee.
+1
Level 52
Oct 30, 2019
Sri Lanka is a country
+2
Level 63
Sep 19, 2015
Unsurprising that the English history question is the least-guessed answer in an American-dominated quiz website. Which is sad considering British history is American history for most Americans.
+2
Level 48
Feb 13, 2016
Not all of it.
+4
Level 72
Jan 16, 2017
Cheer up. It's not sad at all
+1
Level 79
Sep 21, 2017
Being from Maryland, that was an easy question for me!
+3
Level 81
Jun 18, 2018
Not sure what the "most Americans" part of that comment is supposed to mean, but in 2009 only about 13% of Americans were of British ancestry Source
+1
Level 77
Jun 18, 2018
From your link:
However, this figure is likely a serious undercount, as a large proportion of Americans of British descent have a tendency (since the introduction of a new 'American' category in the 2000 census) to identify as simply Americans or if of mixed European ancestry, identify with a more recent and differentiated ethnic group. Eight out of the ten most common surnames in the United States are of British origin.

Plus you have to add Irish Americans for the purposes of the discussion above.
+2
Level 81
Aug 16, 2018
No, you really have to keep the Irish separate. If it weren't for the genocidal policies to give the English wealthy total control of the food supply, there wouldn't be that many Irish in the U.S. All over minor differences in non-Biblical customs within the same religion. As for "British" the only people who call themselves that are the English. It's always a dead giveaway. The Scots, Irish and Welsh are just subjugated by England. Don't call them British, they don't like it.
+1
Level 78
Jul 17, 2018
It is surprising to me, but as an admitted/committed Anglophile, I may know almost as much history of the UK as most Britons. For some reason I find the history, culture, and almost everything about the country very interesting - may have lived there in a former life. I think it all started when I read "Green Darkness" as a child. My mother bought the book and left it out. Probably the only "romance" novel I have ever read, but I was interested in a country that was so much older than my own. Been reading about it ever since.
+1
Level 72
Jul 20, 2018
He’s not any less talented than beyonce rihanna katy perry drake... I could go on. Imho they are all the same
+2
Level 63
Aug 16, 2018
King Chuck getting his head lopped off by 400 years ago isn't super relevant to most American history classes. Yeah, in the long winding road of falling dominoes that is history the English Civil War and the US are definitely related, but that's more of a long-winded academic term paper than a really resonant milestone for American history.
+1
Level 64
Aug 16, 2018
Ugh, no. There is a lot of world history to learn. A *lot.* People can't learn all of it. Whether it was Charles/George/Edward/John/Richard that got his head chopped off in the seventeenth century is not something everyone needs to know. Yes, you could trace a line from the English Civil War to the American Revolution if you wanted to, but the fact is that the whole thing is just not that significant to Americans or their history, and no one should feel inadequate for not knowing it, just as no European should feel inadequate for being ignorant of Warren Harding's presidency. It's always good to learn as much history as you can, but frankly, people have other things going on, and the hard truth, whether you like it or not, is that whether an American knows about King Charles's execution will almost certainly have no effect at all on that person's life. So get over yourself, is what I'm trying to say.
+1
Level 81
Aug 16, 2018
Not all that many Americans are English, far fewer are more than half English. Those who are have ancestors so far removed from now, that it means nothing to them. Sorry, it's been a quarter millennium since the divorce. Our parents are now gone for both of us, the kids have moved off, we live apart and we have a few hundred million other kids with someone else. It's time you move on.
+1
Level 70
Jan 1, 2016
I am surprised that so few got the 'Suet' question right, I'd love to know what part of an animal most thought suet was!
+1
Level 48
Feb 13, 2016
I had no idea what it was.
+2
Level 81
Jun 18, 2018
I guessed pretty much every internal organ.
+1
Level 78
Aug 16, 2018
Apparently there are not a lot of people on this site who feed birds or make English Christmas puddings or mincemeat. (Or raise their own cattle and sheep as we do, and render the suet into tallow.)
+1
Level 67
Feb 26, 2016
I find the pesto question a bit odd. I guess it's fairly common to put pine nuts in it. but if a typical topping for ice cream is sprinkles, it could also be chocolate sauce or a cherry. so why does pine nuts get special treatment?
+1
Level 72
Sep 6, 2016
Yeah, tom88, your anology of sprinkles is to ice cream as pine nuts is to pesto is not valid here. The appropriate one is CREAM is to ice cream as pine nuts is to pesto – as dunkinggandalf said: a required ingredient.
+3
Level 77
Mar 18, 2017
I knew king Charles thanks to Blackadder: The Cavalier Years :D
+1
Level 59
May 24, 2017
Musicals are hardly ever written by one person ("Hamilton" is a rare exception). Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote the music for Phantom but he and Richard Stilgoe wrote the book and Mr. Stilgoe wrote the lyrics with Charles Hart. You should probably change the question to "who wrote the music to Phantom of the Opera?"
+1
Level 88
Jul 10, 2017
Please consider allowing "shoe" for the cobbler question. I typed it six times and moved on thinking I was crazy.
+2
Level 82
Jun 17, 2018
Today's nitpick: New York City consists of 5 boroughs, not buroughs.
+1
Level ∞
Jun 18, 2018
Fixed
+1
Level 87
Jun 20, 2018
15/20
+3
Level 72
Jun 30, 2018
I am distressed to see that in the two years since I last took this quiz, I *still* can't spell "archipelago". Sigh.
+3
Level 70
Aug 2, 2018
It seems grossly unfair that Tim Rice is being ignored. You should accept him as an answer to who wrote the musicals JC and Evita. He did. He wrote the words. Lloyd Weber only did the music.
+1
Level 66
Aug 16, 2018
Please accept pignoli/pignolo/pinolo/pinon, we use the word pignoli (transcribed pinjoli) here in Serbia, and Wikipedia suggests it, too.
+1
Level 58
Aug 16, 2018
This one was half trivia, half spelling bee.
+1
Level 35
Aug 16, 2018
I know, right?
+2
Level 73
Aug 17, 2018
I think "Bomber" could be accepted for U-2 as well.
+1
Level 45
May 14, 2019
Tim Rice should be accepted alongside Andrew Lloyd Webber for the Evita question and Antoninus Pius for the wall.
+1
Level 52
Oct 30, 2019
I think calling any dog-sled race as 'famous' is pushing the boundaries of common sense as far as they will go