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General Knowledge Quiz #20

Can you answer these random trivia questions?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 4, 2022
First submittedNovember 24, 2011
Times taken110,389
Average score60.0%
Rating3.99
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Question
Answer
What is the coldest country in South America by average annual temperature?
Chile
Which body part is the nape a part of?
Neck
Which orchestral woodwind instrument starts with the letter O?
Oboe
What volcano destroyed the city of Pompeii?
Mount Vesuvius
Who requested sharks with frickin' laser beams?
Dr. Evil
What is another name for a cornucopia?
Horn of plenty
What is 12345 + 12345?
24690
Who starred in the movies "Caddyshack", "Ghostbusters", and "Lost in Translation"?
Bill Murray
Who built a wall to separate Scotland and England?
Hadrian
What punishment did the pope inflict on Henry VIII and Martin Luther?
Excommunication
What does a cobbler make and repair?
Shoes
Zoology is the study of animals. What is oology?
Study of eggs
What part of animal is suet?
Fat
What major fault line runs through California?
San Andreas Fault
What king was beheaded during the English Civil War?
Charles I
Who wrote the musicals the "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Evita"?
Andrew Lloyd Webber
What title does someone gain when they are knighted?
Sir or Dame
Which borough of New York City starts with Q?
Queens
In what movie did the main character bend over backwards, dodging bullets
as if they were moving in slow motion?
The Matrix
U2 is a band. What is a U-2?
an Airplane
+1
Level 81
May 16, 2014
Damn you Spanish! I tried Saint Andreas and St Andreas and even Sint Andreas. Of course it's San Andreas. Bwah.
+3
Level 41
Aug 16, 2018
"Sint" is Dutch, by the way.
+4
Level 58
Oct 30, 2019
Sri Lanka is a country
+6
Level 61
Sep 19, 2015
Unsurprising that the English history question is the least-guessed answer in an American-dominated quiz website. Which is sad considering British history is American history for most Americans.
+3
Level 48
Feb 13, 2016
Not all of it.
+9
Level 73
Jan 16, 2017
Cheer up. It's not sad at all
+1
Level 82
Sep 21, 2017
Being from Maryland, that was an easy question for me!
+5
Level 84
Jun 18, 2018
Not sure what the "most Americans" part of that comment is supposed to mean, but in 2009 only about 13% of Americans were of British ancestry Source
+6
Level 80
Jun 18, 2018
From your link:

However, this figure is likely a serious undercount, as a large proportion of Americans of British descent have a tendency (since the introduction of a new 'American' category in the 2000 census) to identify as simply Americans or if of mixed European ancestry, identify with a more recent and differentiated ethnic group. Eight out of the ten most common surnames in the United States are of British origin.

Plus you have to add Irish Americans for the purposes of the discussion above.

+6
Level 87
Aug 16, 2018
No, you really have to keep the Irish separate. If it weren't for the genocidal policies to give the English wealthy total control of the food supply, there wouldn't be that many Irish in the U.S. All over minor differences in non-Biblical customs within the same religion. As for "British" the only people who call themselves that are the English. It's always a dead giveaway. The Scots, Irish and Welsh are just subjugated by England. Don't call them British, they don't like it.
+9
Level 77
Sep 5, 2022
Sorry, but I'm Welsh and British. The only time I feel subjugated is after the occasional England win in the Six Nations. Don't make sweeping statements on our behalf. We don't like it.
+3
Level 72
Sep 5, 2022
+1 ruftytufty

Scottish and British here.

+1
Level 84
Nov 22, 2022
I've also known plenty of Scottish an Welsh people who identified as British.
+3
Level 78
Jul 17, 2018
It is surprising to me, but as an admitted/committed Anglophile, I may know almost as much history of the UK as most Britons. For some reason I find the history, culture, and almost everything about the country very interesting - may have lived there in a former life. I think it all started when I read "Green Darkness" as a child. My mother bought the book and left it out. Probably the only "romance" novel I have ever read, but I was interested in a country that was so much older than my own. Been reading about it ever since.
+1
Level 48
Nov 20, 2022
I'm the opposite. Nothing against them, they seem like great people, but I can't get into the history beyond 2-400 years for whatever reasons.

I think it's too.. long, intricate/complex/intermingled with other interests (which also change for/against).

And it's so old, that I have a hard time putting faith in tales of what happened.

Basically, the Prime Minister quiz sums it up lol. The Americans don't know how lucky they have it with 46 +250 years & not many neighbors.

But I'm very thankful for them. They've obviously accomplished an incredible amount & done a tremendous job of advancing humanity. What a people.

+1
Level 73
Jul 20, 2018
He’s not any less talented than beyonce rihanna katy perry drake... I could go on. Imho they are all the same
+2
Level 71
Jan 5, 2022
This comment here seems like it's in the wrong place.
+1
Level 87
Sep 6, 2022
Probably referring to a question that was removed in an update.
+6
Level 68
Aug 16, 2018
King Chuck getting his head lopped off by 400 years ago isn't super relevant to most American history classes. Yeah, in the long winding road of falling dominoes that is history the English Civil War and the US are definitely related, but that's more of a long-winded academic term paper than a really resonant milestone for American history.
+3
Level 77
Sep 5, 2022
Have a look at the Putney debates and see just how resonant those ideals are with the ones which supposedly drove the American revolution ("every Man that is to live under a Government ought first by his own Consent to put himself under that Government").

If you're even more interested you could also look at the (first) Bill of Rights, the Grand Remonstrance, the Provisions of Oxford and the Magna Carta. American ideals of liberty grew from very deep English roots.

+3
Level 67
Aug 16, 2018
Ugh, no. There is a lot of world history to learn. A *lot.* People can't learn all of it. Whether it was Charles/George/Edward/John/Richard that got his head chopped off in the seventeenth century is not something everyone needs to know. Yes, you could trace a line from the English Civil War to the American Revolution if you wanted to, but the fact is that the whole thing is just not that significant to Americans or their history, and no one should feel inadequate for not knowing it, just as no European should feel inadequate for being ignorant of Warren Harding's presidency. It's always good to learn as much history as you can, but frankly, people have other things going on, and the hard truth, whether you like it or not, is that whether an American knows about King Charles's execution will almost certainly have no effect at all on that person's life. So get over yourself, is what I'm trying to say.
+3
Level 71
Jan 5, 2022
I'd argue that the English Revolution/Civil Wars are only one tier below the French Revolution and American Revolution for the development of modern democracy. Understanding the disconnect between the people and King Charles is important, as it led to important philosophical ideas that spread throughout the world. Without Charles losing his head, who knows if John Locke would have written about government legitimacy and natural rights. Who knows if he would have influenced French Renaissance thinkers. Point being, Warren Harding's presidency did not matter in a historical context like the English Revolution. Knowing the king isn't really all that important, but the English Revolution has definitely impacted every democratic country in a major way.
+2
Level 87
Aug 16, 2018
Not all that many Americans are English, far fewer are more than half English. Those who are have ancestors so far removed from now, that it means nothing to them. Sorry, it's been a quarter millennium since the divorce. Our parents are now gone for both of us, the kids have moved off, we live apart and we have a few hundred million other kids with someone else. It's time you move on.
+1
Level 71
Jan 1, 2016
I am surprised that so few got the 'Suet' question right, I'd love to know what part of an animal most thought suet was!
+3
Level 48
Feb 13, 2016
I had no idea what it was.
+4
Level 84
Jun 18, 2018
I guessed pretty much every internal organ.
+3
Level 77
Aug 16, 2018
Apparently there are not a lot of people on this site who feed birds or make English Christmas puddings or mincemeat. (Or raise their own cattle and sheep as we do, and render the suet into tallow.)
+1
Level 48
Nov 20, 2022
My guesses were stomach, intestine, fat.

I assumed fat would be gel-like. And in my mind, suet looks more like tripe I guess (cow stomach) or haggis. I guess it's shredded fat, so it kind of sort of does depending how you chop it up.

Suet gets categorized into the, "I'm never going to eat/buy it, so throw it into the useless stuff I need to remember just so I don't make a faux pas & order it by mistake." Like sweet bread, etc.

+4
Level 80
Mar 18, 2017
I knew king Charles thanks to Blackadder: The Cavalier Years :D
+1
Level 58
May 24, 2017
Musicals are hardly ever written by one person ("Hamilton" is a rare exception). Andrew Lloyd Webber wrote the music for Phantom but he and Richard Stilgoe wrote the book and Mr. Stilgoe wrote the lyrics with Charles Hart. You should probably change the question to "who wrote the music to Phantom of the Opera?"
+1
Level 61
Nov 21, 2022
Add Meredith Willson and "The Music Man."
+4
Level 93
Jul 10, 2017
Please consider allowing "shoe" for the cobbler question. I typed it six times and moved on thinking I was crazy.
+1
Level 71
Sep 4, 2022
Cobblers are shoesmakers, right?
+1
Level 86
Sep 9, 2022
If you typed the same thing over and over and expected a different result, you may still qualify! ;)
+1
Level 90
Jun 20, 2018
15/20
+8
Level 74
Aug 2, 2018
It seems grossly unfair that Tim Rice is being ignored. You should accept him as an answer to who wrote the musicals JC and Evita. He did. He wrote the words. Lloyd Weber only did the music.
+2
Level 82
Jan 8, 2022
Absolutely true! Though I knew Andrew Lloyd Webber was the answer being sought, Tim Rice is definitely a legitimate answer as he was the lyricist for both shows cited. If he is not accepted, the question should include the word "composer" in its phrasing.
+4
Level 79
Aug 17, 2018
I think "Bomber" could be accepted for U-2 as well.
+5
Level 74
Mar 6, 2021
But it does not, and cannot, carry or drop bombs. It's a plane that takes pictures. A spy plane.
+3
Level 62
Jul 10, 2022
Absolutely not. You're thinking of the B-2.
+5
Level 48
May 14, 2019
Tim Rice should be accepted alongside Andrew Lloyd Webber for the Evita question and Antoninus Pius for the wall.
+4
Level 58
Oct 30, 2019
I think calling any dog-sled race as 'famous' is pushing the boundaries of common sense as far as they will go
+4
Level 79
May 5, 2021
The correct answer to the question about being knighted is "Sir" and only "Sir". Only men are knighted. There isn't a direct female equivalent of the transitive verb 'to knight', you can only say 'to award a damehood'.
+1
Level 71
Nov 20, 2022
wrong, it is still considered being "Knighted". Yes, men are accpeted into "knighthood" and women are accepted into "Damehood", the process is still considered "Knighting"
+3
Level 66
Aug 2, 2022
U-2 is also a german submarine
+2
Level 61
Nov 20, 2022
That was my first guess.
+2
Level 74
Sep 5, 2022
Could you accept "kidney fat" for suet, please?
+6
Level 71
Sep 5, 2022
it's a shame oology is not the study of owls.
+2
Level 77
Sep 5, 2022
or fireworks
+2
Level 72
Sep 6, 2022
or ools
+2
Level 74
Sep 6, 2022
Or the letter "o"
+2
Level 86
Sep 9, 2022
Accept Chilly for the first one? ;)
+1
Level 66
Sep 20, 2022
I guessed Uranium-2, probably a very dangerous isotope.
+3
Level 71
Nov 20, 2022
As others have stated, Tim Rice is the only correct answer for the clue as given. When you ask who wrote the musical JCS and Evita, Webber does not fit. He wrote the MUSIC. He is not the PLAYWRIGHT. Tim Rice is the playwright. Either change the answer to Rice or change the question.
+1
Level 72
Nov 23, 2022
Plus the question is wrongly worded:

Who wrote the musicals *the* "Jesus Christ Superstar" and "Evita"?

+1
Level 64
Nov 20, 2022
U-2 was also a submarine.
+1
Level 66
Nov 20, 2022
Maybe accept banishment for excommunication?
+1
Level 42
Nov 21, 2022
They’re not the same thing.