Google What's the Difference? - Food

Fill the blanks in these Google autocompletes that start with "What's the difference between".
Results may vary
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: May 29, 2016
First submittedApril 26, 2014
Times taken35,419
Rating4.11
6:00
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 / 27 guessed
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What's the difference between ...
Jam and Jelly
a Cupcake and a Muffin
Stew and Soup
a Fruit and a Vegetable
Butterscotch and Caramel
a Banana and a Plantain
Corned Beef and Pastrami
Prawns and Shrimp
Bourbon and Scotch
What's the difference between ...
Coke and Pepsi
a Spring Roll and an Egg Roll
Gelato and Ice Cream
Baking Powder and Baking Soda
Apple Juice and Apple Cider
a Sweet Potato and a Yam
Regular Yogurt and Greek Yogurt
Teriyaki Sauce and Soy Sauce
Mutton and Lamb
What's the difference between ...
a Crepe and a Pancake
Sashimi and Sushi
Bisque and Chowder
Margarine and Butter
Lard and Shortening
a Rutabaga and a Turnip
a Lager and an Ale
a Crawfish and a Crayfish
Maize and Corn
+2
Level 72
May 4, 2014
wow. 100% with 3.46 left. Must have been the 1/2 liter of wine at lunch. fun quiz. thanks
+1
Level 55
May 19, 2014
I also find I do better when I've been drinking.
+3
Level 62
Sep 16, 2016
Me too. Only that I'm old and have fat fingers and never learned to type - apart from poor GK :-( Hoping to reach level 50 before I die!
+2
Level 70
Mar 24, 2017
How are you feeling Isaacs?
+1
Level 78
May 2, 2017
4:51 and I was sober. (But I had taken the quiz a few months ago.)
+1
Level 89
Jul 27, 2014
In Texas we call them crawdads. I've never heard crayfish before. Probably just a regional thing.
+1
Level 57
Jul 27, 2014
I'm from southern Illinois and my family calls them crawdads too, though I have heard lots of other terms.
+1
Level 22
Sep 15, 2020
Same, lived in Georgia most of my life and I've always known them as crawdads
+2
Level 42
Jul 28, 2014
crawdaddies :)
+2
Level 58
Jul 30, 2014
Mudbugs
+2
Level 48
Mar 24, 2017
mountain lobster
+2
Level 47
Aug 16, 2014
I only heard it from The Carpenter's song "Jamalaya"...something crawfish something something gumbo.
+2
Level 79
May 19, 2016
I almost fainted when I saw "Jambalaya" referred to as a Carpenters song!
+3
Level 58
Sep 16, 2016
Jambalaya, crawfish pie, filé gumbo....that sound about right? :) My dad's from Louisiana. I pretty much know that song by heart.
+2
Level 78
Sep 19, 2016
Hank Williams forever.
+1
Level 30
Sep 22, 2016
Ouch... what did the Carpenters do again? That's definitely not their song nor will it ever be haha
+3
Level 78
May 2, 2017
I had to google to see the Carpenters version. I found it on Youtube, and for me it proves the old saying, "Just because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD." How awful - a flute??? I'll bet Hank and Moon are still spinning over that one. I think they'd be okay with Fogerty's version, though.
+1
Level 66
Sep 15, 2020
'Jambalaya' is very much a Carpenters song! The Carpenters have been one of my favourite vocal groups since I was a wee lad! And this was one of their songs I listened to often – loved the flute!
+1
Level 78
Sep 15, 2020
I loved the Carpenters, too. Top of the World was one of my favorites when it came out and I still sing it (when no one's listening.) I'm glad you liked their version of Jambalaya but it's so different from the original it was hard for me to listen to it. Hank Williams wrote and performed Jambalaya in the early 1950s and it became another one of his legendary songs. (I just did some research and Wikipedia says the Carpenters' version was released outside the US and was popular in the UK and Japan.) I wasn't dissing the Carpenters, only their version of the song, but if you like it I hope you keep enjoying it. Hank's original version was a country song about the Cajun region of Louisiana, and he sang the song with a Cajun beat. The Carpenters' version lost the Cajun elements so it made no sense to me. If you haven't heard Hank's version I hope you'll give it a listen. There's quite a difference.
+1
Level 76
Oct 9, 2015
Crayfish is, I think, the British term. I had never heard of crawfish before.
+1
Level 40
Apr 17, 2018
I'm from RI and we call them crayfish.
+3
Level 58
Sep 16, 2016
I'm from Texas, have lived in Kansas for the last too many years. I've heard crawdad, crawfish, and crayfish interchangeably. Crayfish is probably the least commonly used among the three, I think. Here's a cool map showing the difference usage of the three terms in the US. The link is from this article. I would have linked the original source, but the maps don't seem to be working on his site. It's listed in the article, however.
+1
Level 80
Sep 16, 2016
Here in Iowa they're crawdads as well
+1
Level 45
Sep 17, 2016
Yep, it's a regional thing. We usually call them crayfish in Canada. My dad and his best friend use "crawdad" as a code word for smoking pot...
+1
Level 65
Apr 17, 2017
I grew up in Louisiana and then moved to Phladelphia for grad school. I grit my teeth whenever I heard all the Philadelphians calling them crayfish. They're crawfish to sophisticated folk
+1
Level 44
Jun 20, 2019
Crawdads is a hillbilly thing no offense
+1
Level 34
Sep 15, 2020
I call them crawdads too. Where I'm from, people call them crawdads, crawfish, and crayfish.
+2
Level 45
Jul 27, 2014
Greek yogurt? Yogurt does not originate there lol.
+1
Level 67
Aug 13, 2019
And yet, that is what we call that type of yogurt.
+2
Level 44
Jul 29, 2014
This quiz was great. It made me feel smart, whether I am or not.
+1
Level 52
Aug 2, 2014
very original quiz! Makes me want to google some of these now!
+1
Level 68
Sep 16, 2016
How about "hash" for "stew". (Could be a regional or ethnic thing.)
+1
Level 49
Sep 16, 2016
Fun quiz!
+1
Level 63
Sep 16, 2016
There's also Icelandic Yogurt which is very much like Greek Yogurt, only a bit milder in taste. But I guess less known internationally.
+1
Level 45
Sep 17, 2016
It's also called by a completely different name (Skyr) and isn't QUITE the same when you get into the process of making it. It finally became available to buy in Canada and some other countries last year after I'd been looking for it forever, not the totally authentic stuff but same manufacturing method, and oh MAN I love it. I hated most greek yogurt because it always left a nasty aftertaste in my mouth, but I LOVE skyr. The stuff behaves like Greek yogurt (crazy thick, lots of protein and no fat) but has none of the awful aftertaste.
+1
Level 63
Feb 6, 2017
I like them both. "Regular" low-fat yogurt tastes pretty disgusting so I'm very happy with those two. Maybe the taste and aftertaste depends on the actual brand and where/how it's produced. The Skyr I buy is from a Danish-Swedish dairy company (they produce their products for Germany in Germany though). It also used to be the only one. I saw another brand recently but haven't tried it yet. By now there are also quite a few brands of Greek or Greek style yogurt so I haven't tried them all. But they're rather the 10% fat version.
+1
Level 82
Sep 16, 2016
Pancake? Are you kidding me!? I thought for sure the answer would be blintz!
+1
Level 50
Sep 19, 2016
+1
+1
Level 75
Sep 16, 2016
100% with 4.31 to spare.
+2
Level 69
Sep 16, 2016
How about Crisco for shortening? That's what we always called it. Couldn't think of the generic name.
+3
Level 50
Sep 19, 2016
Confusing name brands for generic products is a different quiz.
+2
Level 74
Sep 16, 2016
I wonder what the answer would be if you googled the difference between "regular yogurt and ..." in Greece?
+1
Level 74
Sep 16, 2016
I just tried these google autocompletes, and here in New Zealand eight of the answers are different: jam and marmalade, corned beef and silverside, bourbon and whiskey, coke and diet coke, spring roll and pancake roll, sashimi and raw fish, bisque and soup, and lard and butter. I'd be interested to hear from people in different countries what other different answers come up!
+1
Level 76
Sep 18, 2016
I got lard and dripping.
+1
Level 62
Jul 11, 2020
I only got shortening because I lived in the States for a while. It isn't a word used in UK much if at all. I didn't think of dripping but it is an excellent answer, too good for Googlers though it appears.
+1
Level 64
Sep 15, 2020
As a kiwi, those were pretty much my answers. I got the jelly and the pepsi and the sushi though. Don't know what an egg roll is, we would get either a spring roll or a curry roll.
+1
Level 48
Sep 15, 2020
I typed whiskey for that one and it worked in the quiz. As for the others, I can't say
+5
Level 75
Sep 16, 2016
Really? People don't know the difference between teriyaki sauce and soy sauce?
+2
Level 48
Sep 18, 2016
This also surprise me!
+4
Level 67
Aug 13, 2019
They do now that they've Googled it!
+1
Level 58
Sep 16, 2020
One I like. The other I don't.
+2
Level 54
Sep 18, 2016
If people don't know the difference between apple juice and apple cider they could be headed for a world of pain.
+1
Level 46
Mar 24, 2017
+1
+6
Level 78
Mar 24, 2017
In the US cider and apple juice are basically the same thing. In some areas cider is the name given to freshly pressed apple juice in the raw state and apple juice is the filtered product, but there is no legal standard. Some companies label the same product as cider in the autumn, and apple juice the rest of the year. We refer to fermented apple cider as hard cider.
+7
Level 77
Nov 24, 2017
Good to know, it makes much more sense now. From this side of the pond it looks like asking what the difference is between grape juice and wine.
+1
Level 46
Sep 19, 2016
mine didnt say in any of the suggestions "Lard and shortening" it came up with crisco, butter, suet and dripping but never sortening. please put one of these suggestions up!!! THanks!!! GREAT QUIZ!! ENTERTAINING LOOKING U THINGS IN GOOGLE
+1
Level 75
Dec 30, 2017
Could you accept Sodium Bicarbonate for baking soda pls? Even if it's not what Google comes up with, it is the same thing (and baking soda isn't an oft-used term here in UK)
+1
Level 51
Sep 15, 2020
I'd call it bicarbonate of soda
+1
Level 42
Sep 7, 2018
Can yabbies be accepted for crawfish?
+1
Level 14
Sep 17, 2018
I think Bi-carb Soda should be accepted for Baking soda - it took me a few guesses. :)
+1
Level 37
Mar 3, 2019
I prefer bisque to chowder because a bisque doesn't contain potatoes. I HATE potatoes!
+1
Level 42
Jul 23, 2020
Difference between corned beef and pastrami - pastrimi's nice corned beef not so nice
+1
Level 73
Sep 15, 2020
You've got type-ins here - for example I got away with 'toffee' for 'caramel' and 'whisky' for 'scotch'. Why? Surely given the nature of the quiz you need to insist on the exact search term.
+1
Level 58
Sep 15, 2020
whiskey is literally the same as scotch, only made in Scotland.
+1
Level 32
Sep 21, 2020
There is no e in whisky made in Scotland. Americans use whiskey for a few things they make.
+1
Level 44
Sep 15, 2020
Could you accept soya sauce, too?
+2
Level 55
Sep 15, 2020
This quiz gave me cancer
+1
Level 78
Sep 15, 2020
Well? What IS the difference?
+1
Level 81
Sep 17, 2020
Please accept chowdah.
+1
Level 32
Sep 21, 2020
This quiz seems to just be showcasing how Americans call things different names to the rest of the world