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Groups of Six Quiz #2

Name the members of these famous sixsomes.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 12, 2019
First submittedSeptember 29, 2011
Times taken45,080
Rating4.19
6:00
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+1
level 50
Nov 2, 2013
Ehm, I think you forgot about Northern Territory
+6
level 68
Nov 2, 2013
It's a territory, not a state. Different things.
+2
level 37
Nov 2, 2013
Ehm, Northern Territory is a territory and not an official state, same as the ACT. There are only 6 states.
+3
level 32
Nov 5, 2013
What history are Americans taught about before America was even a country? Surely they are taught about Henry VIII? Or do they just pretend that before America there was nothing?
+1
level 51
Nov 5, 2013
It is not a core part of our curriculum to learn about British Monarchs and their history when we are in grade school or even secondary school. We learn about American history. Some schools may offer European history and many people have the option to study European history once they reach college, but we are not forced to learn about British Monarchs and the royal family because they mean nothing to us (not trying to be rude, just honest) other than the fact that we won the Revolutionary War and are not British subjects. That is probably the most I remember learning about Britain in school was during our units covering the Revolutionary War, but it mainly focused on the American figures from that time (i.e George Washington, Ben Franklin, etc). Maybe if we were actually under British rule we'd be required to learn that information. That hasn't been the case for quite some time, just saying.
+4
level 44
Jul 7, 2014
And that is probably where American and European (or at least small-nation European) approaches differ. If you told anybody in the Czech Republic (where I am from) that you should only learn about Czech history in primary and secondary school, they would find this very odd indeed. Roughly half of our history curriculum was devoted to European and world history, from Stone Age to the end of the Cold war.
+2
level 44
Jun 11, 2016
@Tinu Same for Serbia.
+2
level 35
Jun 11, 2016
I the UK I did mainly British history, though there was quite a lot of European history as well, there was nothing about the rest of the world (outside Europe) apart from the colonial period...
+1
level 54
Jul 31, 2017
Tinu - You guys are on the same continent as each other, so maybe that's a part of the reason for the different approach. We learned a bit about Europe in school, but nowhere near as much as we learned about this side of the world.
+1
level 70
Oct 27, 2017
but what makes that odd is that so much of the USA's culture, language, political theory, and law is derived from European roots especially from the UK, (or really England). Even just taking this quiz as an example the English reformaton triggered by Henry's annulment of his first marriage was the underlying reason why the dominant religion throughout US history has been Protestantism.
+2
level 68
Nov 8, 2013
I learned a bit about British history, but definitely not all of Henry VIII's wives.
+5
level 80
Jul 14, 2014
Exactly. Do schoolchildren in the UK learn about the US First Ladies?
+2
level 43
Jun 11, 2016
@joeythelemur Do schoolchildren in the US learn about US first ladies? With some notable exceptions, not in Oregon, at least.
+1
level 37
Jun 11, 2016
I'm in Pennsylvania and we didn't learn about the First Ladies
+1
level 80
Jun 11, 2016
If Hillary wins, we might...
+1
level 55
Jun 11, 2016
If one was a Rick Wakeman fan, one would know this.
+1
level 80
Jun 13, 2016
Exactly my point. I would guess it's unique to the UK for the wives of a former monarch to still be something that schoolchildren would learn. I remember learning a little about Henry VIII in school, and there was mention that he had a number of wives and a problem with papal authority, but it's not something that we'd have been tested on, and therefore no reason to memorize.
+2
level 23
Dec 5, 2013
According to American Community Survey in 2009 data, Americans reporting British ancestry are an estimated 40,234,652, 13.0% of the total U.S. population. Why on Earth would we be required to learn about British Monarchs with only 13% of our population with ancestry from the UK. The UK has invaded 90% of all countries in the world, do you expect everyone to know who your silly kings and queens were?
+1
level 32
Jan 12, 2014
:D Well said.
+1
level 46
Jan 20, 2014
Too true. He had 8 wives, he killed most of them, what else is there to know?
+1
level 50
Mar 8, 2014
I'm not trying to change the American school curriculum, but just because something isn't always pertinent does not make it irrelevant. Great Britain was (and to a lesser extent is) one of the most important nations in world history. Although perhaps Henry VIII's six wives is not the most important British contribution, simply dismissing every not American is really ignoring almost the entirety of world history. Why then, should we learn about Ancient Egypt? Or China? Or Napoleon? Because these events are interconnected and they further our understanding of our world not as a series of isolated pockets, but as a cohesive whole.
+2
level 58
Mar 18, 2014
Students in a country are taught history about their country. They teach very brief history prior to they revolutionary war and such. Americans know Columbus sailed and "discovered" the Americas. Obviously in Australia they aren't going to study Argentinian history. They teach a basic understanding of events in your country's past. Once you go to college, there is a lot more choice, and anyone who so chooses can study more world history. Canadian history doesn't teach us British history. We learn about (in more minor detail) what the British did prior to Canada becoming a country, but only what happened in the area that would become Canada, ie War of 1812.
+1
level 59
Feb 29, 2016
According to a survey in our office, 95% of people thought baseball wasn't really a sport. 97% thought American football was people with shoulder pads slapping each other. Therefore do you expect everyone to know who the silly players are?
+1
level 43
Jun 11, 2016
Henry VIII was, arguably, one of the most influential people in world history. His conversion to Anglicanism, self-interested as you may think it be, has shaped the course of human events to this day. Although memorizing his wives is rather unnecessary, he himself should be taught.
+1
level 43
Jun 11, 2016
@Symmetrik Australians won't study Argentinian history, because, no offense meant to Argentinians, but Argentina didn't do much. There are a couple of historical footnotes, like the Falklands War, but with the notable exception of Che Guevara very few Argentinians have drastically changed the course of world history. This is not the case for Britain.
+1
level 58
Aug 26, 2018
I learned about Henry's wives in English class, when studying Shakespeare to understand the Elizabethan era, and especially why Richard III might not be depicted historically accurately, but might be skewed evil and he was the enemy of Shakespeare's patron's ancestors.
+1
level 55
Apr 21, 2015
I don't remember if I was taught about him in school or not, but I learned about him and his wives in my leisure reading. I love history.
+1
level 76
Jun 12, 2015
Americans are taught (or, WERE taught - my experience was 30+ years ago, so bear that in mind) a lot of American history, generally starting with colonization in the late 1500s, up to the present. The European history we got from the same time frame was limited, except for things like wars, and generally only as they applied to things occurring in the US. Outside of that, we got a decent amount of ancient history - the rise of civilization in Africa and the Middle East, and the more well known "Empires" such as Egypt, Rome, etc., and a bit about colonization and its aftermath. I used to think that our somewhat xenophobic emphasis was unique, but I've heard it's actually fairly common. Notably, a good friend from England (a generation younger than I) told me that his history lessons were extremely UK-centric, starting with "Willy Conker" and going up to the present.
+1
level 80
Dec 14, 2015
American history is American and usually taught in junior high. To the extent that England and the British Empire influenced American history, it is covered then. We are mostly taught about William I, James VI/I, Henry VIII, and George III. Everyone else was just "some monarch" and simplistic texts conflate the monarchy (even in its present form) with feudalism and oppression. Attention is given to the French Revolution, Spanish and Portuguese colonialism, the Haitian independence, etc. So, the curriculum isn't so much willful ignorance as it is limited to subjects related to "American" History. World History was/is required in secondary schools and as a general education requirement in most college, and it usually includes an "Eastern" and "Western" breakdown. Little attention, if any, is paid to Africa or Pacific Islanders aside from colonialism and WWI/WWII.
+1
level 49
Jun 11, 2016
Here's what I've learnt in history in the past few years in Australia: Year 7 - Ancient stuff (Sumer, Egypt, Greece, Rome). Year 8 - Medieval stuff and all those guys who sailed across the Atlantic. Year 9 - Industrial Revolution, World Wars and some stuff about Australian colonisation. Year 10 - Cold War, Vietnam War and a bunch of boring stuff about Australian society in the 1900s. I'm not sure if, overall, it was really Australia-centric, but I think that most people agree that the part where we actually learn about Australia is the most boring part.
+1
level 62
Jun 11, 2016
We are taught all kinds of history. We all learn that he left the church because he wanted to divorce his wife, and that he had several wives, most of whom he had beheaded. Lots of us know there were several Annes and Catherines among them, but honestly, the names of the wives are basically trivia. So here's my question in return: why is it that every time someone makes an obnoxious comment about the ignorance of Americans, the commenter feels entitled to make an ignorant comment lumping 300 million Americans together as idiots? Or do you not learn what irony is in school? Do you not know we have the world's largest economy, the most top-ranked universities, and the most Nobel prize winners (by well over double the second place country)? Have you not heard of Neil deGrasse Tyson, Carl Sagan, Jonathan Franzen, Martin Scorsese, Stephen Colbert, Paul Farmer, Manuel Lin Miranda? If you know the names of Henry VIII's wives, you should know those names as well. They're all Americans.
+1
level 68
Jun 13, 2016
Canadian teacher of history here. If a course lasted a thousand years, I cannot imagine I would get to the subject of King Henry's wives. The days of treating British monarchs as more important than (say) all of China are over, my friend. Back to your Earl Grey tea.
+2
level 46
Jul 6, 2016
I'm American, and in high school I remember learning this poem from my history teacher: Henry the Eighth To six wives he was wedded. Two divorced, two died, One survived, one beheaded.
+1
level 65
Apr 18, 2017
In general, the US highschool social studies/history curriculum is:: 9th grade Geography (self-explanatory), 10th grade Civics (US law, constitution, congress etc), 11th grade is US history (revolutionary war, louisiana purchase, civil war etc.), 12th grade is world history (everything crammed into one year - ancient Egypt, European history etc)
+1
level 35
Aug 26, 2018
I had to take two years of World History in high school
+2
level 72
Jul 2, 2014
The names of the characters are the same in Clue (the US version) and Cluedo (the version everywhere else). (I wonder why the name difference - copyright wrangles perhaps?). The only difference between the versions is the victim's name, which doesn't matter a whole lot since they, being dead, don't get to do anything.
+2
level 50
Jul 20, 2014
Plus the US version is funnier. John Boddy, get it?
+2
level 68
Sep 15, 2019
Also, Mr Green in Clue is Reverend Green in Cluedo. Apparently the makers thought Americans wouldn't be happy about a parson being a murder suspect.
+1
level 67
Sep 30, 2019
Cluedo is not the version "everywhere else", I do not live in the U.S and grew up with clue.
+1
level 45
Dec 7, 2014
I'm pretty sure Sergeant Gray and Miss Peach are characters in Clue
+2
level 74
Jan 4, 2016
I'm pretty sure that they aren't in any game of Clue/Cluedo that I've ever seen (just saying)
+1
level 74
Dec 14, 2015
What about Bratislava? Capital of Slovakia.
+1
level 84
Dec 14, 2015
Bratislava as the capital of Slovakia?
+1
level 80
Dec 14, 2015
yep
+1
level ∞
Dec 15, 2015
D'oh! Well I guess I will have another clue for Groups of Seven. Replaced "European Capitals Starting with B" with "Cities of the Republic of Ireland".
+1
level 66
Jan 5, 2016
Why do I always spell it "Tazmania"? UGH!
+1
level 58
Jun 11, 2016
'Cause of Tanzania. :)
+1
level 61
Jun 12, 2016
I think it was rhetorical, but if we're answering I think it's more likely because of Taz the Tasmanian Devil from Looney Tunes.
+1
level 59
Feb 29, 2016
When did Texas become a country?
+1
level 47
Jun 11, 2016
1836 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Republic_of_Texas
+1
level 58
Jun 11, 2016
But more to the point, what does the question "Flags over Texas (countries) mean?
+1
level 59
Jun 11, 2016
The question is "which countries' flags have flown over Texas?" i.e. "which states have claimed Texas as part of their territory at one point?" I suspect people either miss Texas itself (not remembering the Republic of Texas) or France (which I associate with northern North America much more).
+1
level 77
Jun 11, 2016
Flags over Texas (countries) was totally meaningless to me. I thought maybe it was an amusement park (Six Flags over Texas??) so I started guessing random countries assuming it must be something like EPCOT with all the national pavilions. If it had said "which countries' flags have flown over Texas?" then I would have gotten them all.
+2
level 76
Jun 11, 2016
Angus Wynne named his first amusement park "Six Flags Over Texas" because his home state had been governed by six different nations at various times during its history. I can't believe I forgot the Confederacy.
+1
level 65
Jun 15, 2016
I've had the same problem as Larry and Eric - the clue was totally meaningless to me. I had to look into comments section to find out what the question was about. Maybe some kind of rephrasing would be a good idea (eg. "Countries that ruled/owned/etc. Texas")?
+1
level 66
Sep 19, 2019
Seeing how “Six Flags Over Texas” is the correct term, it should definitely not be changed. If you don’t recognize it, then you should try to use critical thinking to reason it out. Like “Hm, Six Flags Over Texas? When are flags flown over places? Oh, yeah, when they are controlled by that country! It’s asking for the six countries that controlled Texas!”
+1
level 58
Jun 11, 2016
What do you mean, "when"? Since always, you silly non-Texan.
+1
level 76
Jun 11, 2016
Ya' gotta love Texas pride. Near Dallas we saw a bread delivery truck with "Texas Born and Texas Bread" painted on the sides.
+1
level 81
Jul 5, 2016
I'm sure the reference is to the Six Flags theme parks, which has locations in different places in America, even though they started and are based in Texas. As a Texan it was easy for me, but I could see how it might be hard to get all 6 for anyone who never studied Texas history. People familiar with American history should be able to figure out most of them though. Spain, Mexico, the Confederacy, and USA seem pretty obvious.
+1
level 77
Jun 11, 2016
Interestingly (to me) I missed a bunch, but my knowledge seems to align perfectly with the common man's on this one as I got everything currently guessed above 40%, and missed those under.
+1
level 56
Jun 12, 2016
Haha oops I said "Anne of Chives" instead of Cleves. Close but still not correct.
+1
level 72
Aug 21, 2017
Ha! Made me spit my drink out!
+2
level 31
Jun 15, 2016
Divorced, beheaded, died, Divorced, beheaded, survived
+2
level 21
Jun 18, 2016
Technically there are 10 Australian states, the 4 that you forgot were Northern Territory, Australian Capital Territory, Norfolk Island, and Lord Howe Island
+2
level 66
Sep 19, 2019
No, those four are just territories.
+1
level 65
Sep 26, 2019
NT and ACT are territories, Norfolk is an external territory, and Lord Howe is part of NSW. There are 6 states, "technical" or otherwise.
+2
level 32
Oct 14, 2016
Reverend Green should be accepted for Mr. Green.
+2
level 62
Mar 9, 2017
Yes it's Rev Green, not Mr Green. Thanks.
+1
level 69
Apr 8, 2017
3 suggested changes re Australian answers: The longest river is Murray/Darling SA as an alternative for South Australia WA as an alternative for Western Australia
+2
level 72
Aug 21, 2017
Possibly my all-time biggest miss: Amazon river. D'OH!
+1
level 76
Nov 10, 2017
We could have done about the Italian Renaissance, the Huguenot wars, the Protestant Reformation, even the English Reformation - but no, it was imperative to know Henry VIII's wives by heart. I always thought that part of the history curriculum was a bit pointless.
+1
level 56
Apr 7, 2018
Did not realise that there are only 6 Irish cities! 6! Wow! I thought there were a lot more given that there are 4.5m people in Ireland. The rest must all be tiny villages or something, haha.
+1
level 41
May 16, 2018
Accept Reverend Green for Mr. Green? That's what he's called in the UK.
+1
level 67
Sep 30, 2019
or you could save yourself time and just put "green"
+1
level 21
Jul 27, 2018
It's spelt Katherine Parr
+2
level 76
Sep 17, 2018
Wikipedia says "Catherine Parr (alternatively spelled Katherine, Katheryn or Katharine, signed 'Katheryn the Quene KP')".
+1
level 32
Apr 16, 2019
but Texas isn't a country
+1
level 66
Sep 19, 2019
It used to be though...
+1
level 50
Sep 30, 2019
I want to add my voice to those saying 'flags over Texas' is a baffling clue. I even googled it to try to work out what the question meant, but that didn't help
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