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History by Letter - W

Name these historical people, places, and things beginning with the letter W.
Last updated: December 12, 2016
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Hint
Answer
Once known as "The Great War"
World War I
U.S. President during the above
Woodrow Wilson
German Kaiser during that same war
Wilhelm II
British commander at Waterloo
Duke of Wellington
German composer of "The Ring"
Richard Wagner
Bury my heart at this place where
Native Americans were massacred
Wounded Knee
City burned by British troops in 1814
Washington D.C.
Place where English monarchs are
crowned, married, and buried
Westminster Abbey
City whose Jewish ghetto
was razed in 1943
Warsaw
L.A. neighborhood struck by
race riots in 1965
Watts
Hint
Answer
Norman conqueror of England
William I
Airplane inventors
Wright Brothers
Lord Chancellor to King Henry VIII
Cardinal Wolsey
Name of the British royal
family, since 1917
House of Windsor
Country conquered by
Edward Longshanks in 1282
Wales
Irish writer persecuted for being gay
Oscar Wilde
Germany, 1919-1933
Weimar Republic
Nixon political scandal
Watergate
Scottish patriot drawn and
quartered in 1305
William Wallace
Former liberal political party of
the U.S. and Great Britain
Whig
+2
level 44
Sep 10, 2014
Isn't it a usual practice to convert names of foreign monarchs to English (e. g. Catherine the Great of Russia or Good King Wenceslas?) Shouldn't you accept William II as a name for the German Emperor, then? Also, only two English monarchs got married in the Westminster Abbey - Henry I in 1100 and Richard II in 1382 (sic Wikipedia), whereas in more recent times, principal members of the Royal family usually wedded in chapels of various royal palaces (for example, Queen Victoria in St George's Chapel in Windsor). It has been only in the 20th century when Westminster Abbey became a popular wedding venue for some (British, not English) Royals - no king or queen, though. Otherwise, a very nice quiz!
+1
level 65
Nov 4, 2014
Charles would make a nice transition, since he got married both in Westminster (to Diana), and in Windsor (to Camilla).
+3
level 73
Nov 11, 2014
It's not a usual practice it's just an arbitrary quirk of popular custom. Tsars Nikolai, Yketerina, Aleksandr and Piotr are almost always changed to Nicholas, Catherine, Alexander and Peter. Willem of Orange is changed to William. Salah ad-Din is bastardized into "Saladin," etc.

but on the other hand, Charlemagne is never called Charles the Great, Suleiman the Magnificent is not Solomon, Francisco Franco is not called Francis, Louis does not become Lewis, and Kaiser Wilhelm is not Cesar/Emperor William.

There's no rule about this it's just convention.
+1
level 60
Sep 16, 2016
I think if it's written in a language with English characters, we don't Anglicize it. German and French use the English/Latin alphabet, Russian and Arabic don't. I just figured that out myself.
+1
level 47
Nov 13, 2016
@YantheMan Then how come William of Orange is referred to as such? I believe that was modern-day Netherlands area, which probably used the Latin alphabet, which is what many nations use, especially in Europe and the Americas.
+1
level 70
Nov 26, 2017
Also, by the same token, William the Conqueror would be Guillaume
+2
level 59
Nov 26, 2017
Or as we knew him in school, Billy the Conk.
+1
level 57
Nov 27, 2017
William the Conqueror and William of Orange are both most famous as kings of England, even if their origins aren't English.
+1
level 64
Nov 27, 2017
@Corrode that depends on which William of Orange you mean, as this name doesn't only refer to William III of England, but also to William the Silent. In the Netherlands, 'Willem van Oranje' almost always refers to the latter.
+1
level 53
May 14, 2018
There are only two things I can't stand in this world: people who are intolerant of other people's cultures and the Dutch.
+1
level 69
Jul 1, 2017
Yes, but all of them were crowned there since 1066 except Edwards V and VIII, the two shortest reigning kings, neither of whom lasted a year. Never call a prince Edward
+1
level 67
Nov 11, 2014
can this be anymore euro and americentric?
+1
level 73
Nov 11, 2014
Yes. If they took out the clue about World War I and replaced it with something about Wallachia, the Whitechapel murders, or perhaps Waterloo.
+1
level 42
Nov 14, 2014
If you can find the letter W in Japanese historical events, be our guest.
+1
level 73
Nov 17, 2014
pretty common in Chinese.
+1
level 67
May 14, 2018
In China's Three Kingdoms period, two of those kingdoms were called Wu and Wei. A question based on one of those would fit nicely here.
+1
level 52
Nov 17, 2014
We're Americans. We're in love with ourselves. Get over it.
+1
level 56
Nov 28, 2017
We're not all Americans
+2
level 60
Nov 26, 2017
The letter W is not common in most languages. The major exceptions are English, German, Polish and maybe Chinese. So, in this case, the quiz is perfectly fine focusing on English-speaking countries.
+1
level 56
Nov 28, 2017
And in Welsh - I demand lots of questions about Wales and the Welsh, because this site is about people being self-absorbed and their pathetic attempts at wanting what they want and I want to join in! :-D
+1
level 39
Nov 26, 2017
Here we go again; anglicizing people's names to accommodate our inflated egos (or simple arrogance).
+2
level 73
Nov 26, 2017
This is the 2nd worst comment of yours I've seen in the past 10 minutes. It has nothing to do with ego.
+1
level 56
Nov 28, 2017
Famous historical people's names are very often "translated" - the current Queen of the UK is known as Alžběta in Czech, Henry VIII is Enrique VIII in Spanish, Wilhelm II is known as Guillem II in Catalan, William the Conqueror is Guillaume le Conquérant in French. Rather than stating ill-informed opinionated nonsense, how about doing a cursory amount of research beforehand.
+2
level 26
Nov 27, 2017
the wright brothers didn't invent the plane
+1
level 44
Jul 25, 2018
Possibly not, but theirs were the first heavier-than-air, man-carrying aircraft to take off, do maneuvers and land. Their places in aviation history far surpass those of other early aviation pioneers such as Langley and Santos-Dumont.
+2
level 67
Nov 27, 2017
Got Cardinal Wolsey by accident because I was trying to be a smartass and type Wellington's real name (Wellesley), but I horribly misspelled it as Woolsey.