Homophones #3

Each of these words has two homophones. Guess what they are.
A homophone is a word that sounds the same but is spelled differently
For this quiz, spelling must be exact
Quiz by Quizmaster
Rate:
Last updated: March 17, 2018
First submittedFebruary 18, 2013
Times taken36,019
Rating4.22
5:00
Enter word here:
0
 / 32 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers also scored 100%
The average score is
Your high score is
Your fastest time is
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Word
Homophone #1
Homophone #2
Vain
Vane
Vein
Prays
Praise
Preys
By
Buy
Bye
Sent
Cent
Scent
You
Ewe
Yew
For
Fore
Four
Poor
Pore
Pour
Errs
Airs
Heirs
Word
Homophone #1
Homophone #2
Idle
Idol
Idyll
Meat
Meet
Mete
Pair
Pare
Pear
Peak
Peek
Pique
Raise
Rays
Raze
Road
Rode
Rowed
Rain
Reign
Rein
Freeze
Frees
Frieze
+8
Level 25
Mar 20, 2013
what about peer for pair? and errs is not really pronounced the same as airs and heirs.
+11
Level 51
Jun 30, 2013
Homophone quizzes are always tough because it's impossible to take all regional accents into account. :/
+5
Level 50
Jun 30, 2013
Ir can be pronounced such. To err is human.
+5
Level 58
Jul 1, 2013
That is quit errksome, surely the only interpretation should be the English one.

I take a deep breath of err and calm down.

+1
Level 71
Nov 8, 2015
My understanding (I'm not a professional linguist, so I only know what I read on the Internet) is that the pronunciation of "errs" to rhyme with "airs" is a recent development, a back formation from the word "error," in which the first syllable rhymes with "air." Take a look at http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/26042/pronunciation-of-err for some literary evidence as to how "err" was pronounced by Britons in the 19th Century (with counterarguments too). It also appears that the "airs" pronunciation is an American thing--if I had to guess, I'd say it started with sports announcers, who are always changing the way that words are pronounced.
+1
Level 83
Aug 29, 2018
Howerrd Cossell?
+3
Level 81
May 5, 2013
good one. Shows just what a complete mess English spelling is. Webster did well clearning it up a little bit, but he really ought to have gone much further than he did. and... what is a Frieze? I'm going to have to look that one up...
+4
Level 72
Sep 11, 2013
Frieze is an architectural term. It makes up the center part of an entablature, which is the 3-part band around the roof line of old buildings
+1
Level 38
May 9, 2014
No it isn't, it preserves etymological and semantic information.
+1
Level 81
Nov 8, 2015
A better place for which would be in the footnotes of the OED.
+3
Level 67
May 11, 2018
Ah, but if we are to spell phonetically, which pronunciation to use? The American, RP English and Scottish spellings of "water" would be quite different - and that's before we get into local dialects.
+1
Level 60
Sep 16, 2018
I could invent a completely phonetic spelling system for my accent, but I don't think anyone here would agree with it.
+1
Level 43
Apr 6, 2020
I prefer the spelling of words without Webster's bizarre changes. In a language where people only just began to learn grammar once more after it was regarded as unimportant, the last thing we needed was for the spelling to become regional and split into many different forms. Perhaps this is just me being fussy, but I prefer being articulate in speeches, writing pieces and in conversation, and I find that Webster takes that aspect away from this language in several aspects. (Seriously, 'wimmen'? I mean, come on, why did anyone listen to this guy?)
+10
Level 26
Jun 30, 2013
Errs in English (UK) doesn't sound like Airs or Heirs, it's closer to erm in sound without the m on the end. That said, the Yorkshire accent would sound right with that pronunciation.
+10
Level 58
Jun 30, 2013
I'm Australian, we pronounce "err" to rhyme with cur not care.
+2
Level 74
Feb 25, 2014
We also pronounce Fraser to rhyme with Kerr and cur, but that's another story....
+1
Level 74
Sep 4, 2016
I see what you did there, Wombat.
+2
Level 72
Jun 30, 2013
I'm English (from the South) and I've only heard errs pronounced 'airs'! But as people have already said regional accents vary so much.
+1
Level 57
Jan 18, 2014
Same here in Boston!
+1
Level 65
Mar 18, 2018
Boston native. Had a hard to with "errs" because I couldn't think of anything that rhymes with "hers". I am aware of the "airs" pronunciation, but I never say it that way.
+1
Level 71
Aug 26, 2018
I tried hers to rhyme with errs as the Yorkshire pronunciation would drop the H :D
+1
Level 72
Oct 18, 2016
I have your basic US Middle Atlantic (and middle-aged – ha!) non-accent accent, and have lived in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington DC, Florida, and Colotado, with a lot of time spent in many other areas all over the US and Eastern/Atlantic Canada, and I too hear "errs" as just a bit different from "airs" or "heirs".
+2
Level 73
Aug 26, 2018
the only thing I could think of to sound like errs was erse - but that's pretty archaic. Errs certainly doesn't sound like airs/heirs in the UK.
+3
Level 74
Aug 26, 2018
In New Zealand, heirs and airs are honomyms, but are pronounced differently from errs, which is pronounced more like "urze". And we pronounce idle with a long "i" ("eye-dull"), but idyll with a short "i", rhyming with "riddle".
+1
Level 73
Jun 19, 2019
I'm from New Zealand, and I didn't get that one either, because it never occurred to me that anyone might pronounce 'errs' like 'airs'. Maybe the quiz-setter speaks an obscure dialect only known in one suburb of Bradford, or something like that.
+1
Level 65
Dec 31, 2020
Yeah that one threw me off, I tried hers (in cockney), ughs, even hearse...
+1
Level 81
Jun 30, 2013
got 100% this time.
+1
Level 36
Jun 30, 2013
I have to agree that Errs is pronounced as Hers without the H and also Paw is a nhomophone of poor so this could have been accepted as well.#

Although to err is human, errs is plural and changes the pronounciation.

+1
Level 83
Aug 29, 2018
Plural?
+5
Level 56
Jun 30, 2013
Errs is not pronounced the same as "Airs" or "Heirs". Also, can you accept for "Paw" for being synonymous with Poor?
+1
Level 35
Oct 2, 2013
I agree
+2
Level 45
Jun 30, 2013
There are also different pronunciations for "poor". Some say "pore" to rhyme with "ore"; others say "poor" emphasizing the double "o" sound, like poooooor.
+1
Level 35
Oct 2, 2013
My maths teacher says it like poo-er, dead quick like. I think that's kind of what you were saying?
+2
Level 54
Jul 1, 2013
Good quiz. Accents really do change things, I agree that Errs is pronounced differently than heirs and airs. Also I've always pronounced Idle with the I sounding like eye whereas idyll I've always started like Id (as in Ego, Id etc). Maybe I've been saying it wrong all these years.

Missed a few easy ones though as once I got one spelling in my head it was surprisingly difficult to think of a different one!

+2
Level 57
Mar 14, 2014
I disagree with the Errs-Heirs-Airs (not just you but everyone). Err is a derivation of Error. Err is the verb whereas Error is a noun. An Error is a mistake, to Err is to make a mistake. Even with accents I find it hard to believe that anyone pronounces it "ur-ur". Error is pronounced "Air-or", or "Air-er", as Err is a direct derivation of that, it should thus be pronounced "Air". Meaning Errs would be pronounced as "Airs".
+1
Level 75
Jan 22, 2016
I agree with you that err is pronounced the same as the beginning of error but your analogy is flawed. There are plenty of words which are derived from other words but change the way they are pronounced. If only I could think of an example right now...
+2
Level 74
Aug 26, 2018
I can: error and err.
+1
Level 39
Jul 1, 2013
Why is "race" not accepted?
+1
Level 65
Dec 31, 2020
It has an 's' sound not a 'z' sound.
+1
Level 66
Jul 1, 2013
This is a good quiz--tougher than you would think.
+1
Level 37
Jul 2, 2013
To us Californians, the word pairs in this quiz were certainly all homophones.
+1
Level 72
Sep 11, 2013
Same for Illinoisians
+1
Level 26
Jul 4, 2013
Why is "frizz" not accepted?
+2
Level 50
Sep 7, 2013
Because it's not a homophone of any of the words in the quiz.
+3
Level 50
Sep 7, 2013
Idyll and idol are not homophones. O_o
+1
Level 67
Nov 18, 2016
Completely agree.
+2
Level ∞
Mar 17, 2018
They are perfect homophones in the standard American accent. Go to Google translate, type "Idol idyll", and hit play. There is no difference.
+1
Level 66
Jun 23, 2020
Well that must be a mistake online or a mistaken pronunciation in American English. There are obviously variations in the way we say certain words, but idyll and idol are not among them. Id-ill and Eye-dol/dul.
+2
Level 38
May 9, 2014
Words which are different in my accent:

Poor vs Pore/Pour

Err vs Air/Heir

Idyll vs Idol/Idle

+1
Level 78
Jun 30, 2014
Enjoyed this one. Tougher than I thought it would be. Missed yew, heirs, idyll, and pique.
+1
Level 74
Aug 1, 2014
Paw is a homophone (maybe this is to do with British/Canadian/Australian/NZ accents, where it is a more obvious homophone)
+3
Level 68
May 19, 2015
I've always pronounced "idyll" as "id-ill", not "eye-dul" :\
+1
Level 70
Oct 4, 2015
So have I, unfortunately accents make Homophones quite difficult to please everybody. As an English born man, having lived and worked in 8 different English speaking (mostly) countries I often mix up my accents and pronunciation and change my accent depending who I'm speaking to.
+1
Level 79
Oct 28, 2015
Errs is not pronounced like airs and heirs. And in what part of the world do people pronounce poor the same as pore and pour?
+1
Level 78
Nov 8, 2015
In the mid-south of the US for one.
+1
Level 47
Aug 30, 2018
New Zealand, Australia
+1
Level 67
Dec 17, 2018
how else could you pronounce it?
+1
Level 63
Nov 9, 2015
Fun quiz - pretty much gives you the answers but still hard. (I should have done better!)
+1
Level 70
Nov 9, 2015
If you're from New York, errs doesn't sound like airs. It must be a Midwest thing. When I moved to the Midwest from New Jersey, I realized that people couldn't distinguish between the names Aaron and Erin, which are completely, utterly different pronunciations to me.
+1
Level 72
Oct 18, 2016
I think both examples you just cited, dasubergeek, are true not just in the Phila/NJ/NY Northeast, but also all the way down the Middle Atlantic to DC as well as up and throughout New England. (But if we had to tackle "draw"/"drawer" in Rhode Island/Mass. or "water"/"wooder" in Philly, things would get REALLY convoluted!)
+2
Level 56
Nov 10, 2015
What about "paw" as a homphone of pour, pore and poor?
+1
Level 79
Aug 26, 2018
Only if you're British. Pronouncing "aw" as "or" instead of "ah" creates the amusing situation that you pronounce "flaw" like "floor". I heard a song on the radio where the guy kept singing "All of my floors and all of your floors", and had no idea what he was talking about it. It got really weird when he said "you have always worn your floors upon your sleeve".
+1
Level 71
Nov 10, 2015
I have never ever hear "errs" pronounced close to that way - to ryhme with airs? Naaah.

I have lived in Australia and the UK and been to the US a number of times. Simply can't believe it's true.

Also, paw for poor - totally yes.

And idyll? I was dubious, but I looked that up and now I learnt something.

+1
Level 79
Aug 26, 2018
Paw for poor: not in the North American pronounciation.
+2
Level 77
Nov 12, 2015
Those people who are complaining - just pronounce the whole quiz in an American accent. I've got used to that now.
+1
Level 79
Aug 26, 2018
Yes. Except for "poor" being a homophone for "pore" and "pour". Apparently that's a southern US thing. In the north, it's pronounced with a long U, like "room". Poo-er.
+2
Level 64
Sep 10, 2016
Hue for "you" ??...
+1
Level 72
Oct 18, 2016
"Hue" definitely has an aspirated "h" at the beginning.
+1
Level 46
Nov 18, 2016
ROAD AND RHODE
+1
Level 79
Aug 26, 2018
Except that "rhode" isn't a word by itself. It's a proper noun when followed by "Island". Pluralize it and it becomes another proper noun -- the island of Rhodes -- or the first half of "Rhodes Scholar".
+1
Level 64
Nov 30, 2017
This is probably my favorite category :-)
+1
Level 67
May 11, 2018
I appreciate that accents vary, but, as someone from the South of England, "Errs" is not a homophone of "Airs" and "Heirs" (it rhymes with "Hers") and "Idyll" is not a homophone of "Idle" and "Idol" - the initial "I" being pronounced as it "it".
+1
Level 82
Jan 30, 2019
and the yll being like a short il not ol (although I can see how some accents may vary that)
+1
Level 61
Jun 28, 2018
Errs should be removed given other countries such as Australia don't pronounce it "airs".
+1
Level 70
Aug 7, 2018
Nice one. Tough, but got 100% on the first try. Frieze was the hardest. Definitely do not understand the Paw comments or that errs is not pronounced like airs/heirs. How do you say it? Urs?

(I live in Oklahoma)

+2
Level 65
Aug 26, 2018
There's a great study on American dialects that offers some cool maps on not only pronunciation but also regional vocabulary. You can participate or just check out their results: http://www.tekstlab.uio.no/cambridge_survey/. And for you non-Americans, now you can sate your curiosity as to what locale in 'Mericuh your particular dialect most closely matches (if you get Boston then chances are you have a severe speech impediment and should seek specialist therapy).
+1
Level 69
Dec 26, 2018
'Ey, bustah, that's really wicked roode of ya tah mock mah Bahston accent! I oughta clobbah ya one!
+2
Level 68
Aug 26, 2018
Maybe do one for American English and one for... you know, English.
+1
Level 65
Aug 26, 2018
Got all easy. Except for errs. Man I was stumped! Nothing rhymes with errs!! I was so surprised to see the answer! Kiwi accent for you.
+1
Level 61
Aug 26, 2018
Errs is pronounced as spelled in Australia. Not fair. Otherwise, I scored 100%. >:-(
+1
Level 44
Aug 26, 2018
You shouldn't use words that don't sound alike in different accents. Its not difficult to find other homophones that aren't complete red herrings to people who don't pronounce words exactly the same way you do.
+1
Level 61
Aug 27, 2018
gee. or perhaps you could go and make those quizzes and allow the quizmaster to make his quizzes as he likes.
+1
Level 26
Aug 27, 2018
If you can't think of how other people might pronounce a word, that's your lack of understanding of English, and you don't deserve to get that one right.
+1
Level 44
Aug 29, 2018
I think a quiz 'master' has a responsibility to avoid words in a homophone quiz that aren't homophones to most people. Especially when alternatives are easy to find.
+1
Level 71
Aug 27, 2018
Just look the word up. Errs is a soft e whereas to make errs rhyme with airs it would have to be a hard e. Thus airs is not a homophone of errs.
+1
Level 56
Aug 27, 2018
Raise=Race
+1
Level 81
Aug 27, 2018
There is a difference between voiced and unvoiced consonants
+2
Level 53
Aug 29, 2018
I wish I had some popcorn for all the debates in this thread. Are people just now learning that there are different pronunciations for different areas? I figured, with TV and all...
+1
Level 61
Aug 29, 2018
What about Ears?
+2
Level 47
Aug 30, 2018
You need to specify the accent you're using, so many things don't belong or are missing based on various accents.
+1
Level 53
Sep 1, 2018
idyll is not pronounced the same as idol!
+1
Level 67
Dec 17, 2018
I got frieze and pique and only missed six, got neither of the errs, not sure how to pronounce it ( not from an english speaking country, so pretty proud :) cause this is quite tough)

Shouldnt "hue" be an acceptable answer for a homopone for "you" (did try jew not yew :/ but it is more pronounced djew anyway I thought, so hue would be a better fit)

+1
Level 75
Dec 27, 2018
The H in hue is pronounced - it is a homophone of Hugh and they both sound like 'HYOO'

You and yew are both pronounced as 'YOO'

+1
Level 47
Jun 19, 2019
'errs' is not a homophone for 'airs'. they are not pronounced the same
+1
Level 71
Jun 19, 2019
I pronounce 'idyll' as /ɪdɪl/, not /ʌɪd(ə)l/.
+1
Level 84
Jul 7, 2019
Jerry from NZ (above) said:

In New Zealand, heirs and airs are honomyms, but are pronounced differently from errs, which is pronounced more like "urze". And we pronounce idle with a long "i" ("eye-dull"), but idyll with a short "i", rhyming with "riddle".

I'm from the UK and agree totally in all respects. Re 'errs' I'm from the Midlands, lived in the south west and south east and now in the north and have never heard errs pronounced in any way than urze. (Mind you, I haven't lived in Yorkshire :-) .)

+1
Level 66
Jul 13, 2020
Totally agree with this, erm, Ears? Did I pronounce that correctly? I rhymed it with errs.
+1
Level 46
Nov 11, 2020
"Errs"/"Airs" and "Idle"/"Idyll" only work in an American accent.
+1
Level 69
Nov 13, 2020
Mane and Main sound awfully lot like Vain.