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Homophones #4

For each word, guess (and correctly spell) its homophone.
A homophone is a word that sounds the same but is spelled differently
Last updated: September 07, 2018
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Word
Homophone
Base
Bass
Seed
Cede
Wet
Whet
Click
Clique
Aisle
Isle
Aloud
Allowed
Bread
Bred
Cash
Cache
Word
Homophone
Shoot
Chute
Flower
Flour
Herd
Heard
Jam
Jamb
Nose
Knows
Lean
Lien
Links
Lynx
Morning
Mourning
Word
Homophone
Taut
Taught
Throne
Thrown
Tide
Tied
Whale
Wail
Course
Coarse
Sensor
Censor
Chased
Chaste
Claws
Clause
+2
level 81
Mar 18, 2018
The links clue also shows up on the first "Homophones" quiz.
+1
level 20
Jun 19, 2018
Also seed
+10
level 74
Mar 18, 2018
Also, censer.
+1
level 58
Sep 17, 2018
That's what I tried first. It still doesn't work.
+1
level 43
Sep 17, 2018
same
+14
level 63
Mar 18, 2018
For the ones I am not getting right away, I find it helps to physically look away from the quiz and say the word.
+4
level 72
Mar 18, 2018
Aisle = I'll ??? Although I do agree with correct answer.
+1
level 53
Mar 19, 2018
Depending on where you're from, I'll can be pronounced like 'aisle/isle', 'all', or some combination of the two.
+3
level 67
Mar 20, 2018
I guess "I'll" is technically two words
+1
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
Yeah, I think you're right on the pronunciation part, but contractions probably don't qualify as "a word".
+7
level 76
Mar 18, 2018
Also "wale" = beat/whip, or mark made from whipping
+2
level 74
Mar 19, 2018
The spelling "wale" has several additional definitions, applying to structural members, ship building and fabric weaving.
+4
level 77
Mar 21, 2018
Yes. My first thought was a corduroy wale (e.g., wide-wale corduroy pants).
+1
level 49
Sep 18, 2018
Yep - my mom sewed, so wale was my first thought, too.
+2
level 68
Sep 17, 2018
Tried "wale" first as well.
+1
level 67
Sep 17, 2018
Me too.
+1
level 69
Mar 19, 2018
claus, like Santa Claus
+2
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
Proper nouns that are names would not qualify, since that could potentially make ANY word a homophone!
+1
level 75
Mar 19, 2018
"Corse" for "course"? It is both a synonym of "corpse" and the French word for Corsica, and for some reason the first homophone I thought of for that one.
+2
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
"Corse" for corpse is archaic, although I don't know what Quizmaster's policy is on proper nouns. I'm guessing accepting them would just leave WAY too much leeway.
+8
level 65
Mar 19, 2018
Clique rhymes with meek where I come from, not with Mick. But no trouble to guess it knowing US pronunciation. Agree that I'll should work for Aisle.
+1
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
I saw that pronunciation of clique when I looked up its phoenetic spelling. Wacky! What country/region is that pronunciation used?
+3
level 65
Apr 29, 2018
australia, canada, uk and given it comes from a french word and that pronunciation of i is closer to the vowel sound in french presumably most of the french speaking world.
+1
level 57
Mar 19, 2018
could Bays also work for 1 ?
+1
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
Only if base and bass rhymed with faze or haze or maze, which they don't
+1
level 52
Mar 19, 2018
100% with a 1:05 left.
+1
level 71
Mar 26, 2018
100% with 2:42 left.
+1
level 57
Jun 17, 2018
Why so slow?
+2
level 44
Mar 20, 2018
How about "I'll?"
+1
level 82
Mar 20, 2018
I struggled with the 'course' clue - took me a while to think of 'coarse' as I kept trying 'cause' even though it didn't work the first couple of times I tried it! Anyone else think 'cause' should be acceptable?
+1
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
Phoenetic spelling of course: kôrs. Phoenetic spelling of coarse: kôrs. Phoenetic spelling of cause: kôz. So, to address your specific question, it doesn't really matter how many people "think" or "feel" that an answer "should" be accepted, because homophones aren't actually defined by opinions.
+1
level 82
Mar 22, 2018
I apologise, I didn't realise it was linked to phonetics (perhaps this should be explained in the instructions/caveats?). I was just going on how words 'sounded' to me when I say them - this is obviously open to interpretation and dialects/accents can affect how words are pronounced. I would still argue the words do 'sound' the same, which is what the quiz asked for, although not perfectly aligned phonetically and I am entitled to my incorrect opinion :)
+1
level 71
Mar 24, 2018
"I would still argue the words do 'sound' the same, which is what the quiz asked for, although not perfectly aligned phonetically"
"Same" is not the same as "almost same" or "similar". If they're not "perfectly aligned phonetically", then they aren't homophones by definition.
+1
level 82
Apr 4, 2018
That is what I mentioned in my last reply - the quiz states "A homophone is a word that sounds the same but is spelled differently". Perhaps it could be amended to state "A homophone is a word that is phonetically the same but spelled differently" as I don't know the exact meaning of the word homophone and didn't look it up before taking the quiz, so simply went off the instructions. I obviously know now so my suggestion for an amendment would be for others who make the same mistake as me...
+1
level 52
Sep 16, 2018
Phonetics is the same thing as how words sound. Different accents will have different homophones. But I agree that "course" and "cause" are not homophones. A homophone is a word that sounds exactly the same, not just similar. "Course" has a 's' sound at the end, whereas "cause" has a 'z' sound at the end. Unless you have an accent that I don't know of, they won't be homophones in your accent either.
+1
level 69
Mar 22, 2018
I'm going to reiterate my heartfelt plea that everyone first look up the IPA/phoenetic spelling of the word you think should be accepted. If it doesn't match the clue word's, then you're incorrect, so please don't post.
+1
level 82
Mar 22, 2018
It appears this is something you care deeply about. I feel the same way on subjects I am great at but others keep getting wrong albeit with fewer comments correcting people
+6
level 52
Sep 16, 2018
The "correct" answers will be different depending on your accent. IPA transcriptions are different for a General American accent and a Received Pronunciation (British) accent. There are countless other accents where IPA transcriptions are largely unavailable. As long as you understand that homophones must sound exactly the same then you are probably right to point it out. For example, in my (British) accent "click" and "clique" are not homophones. The difference is the same as between "hit" and "heat".
+1
level 74
Sep 17, 2018
I don't like being told not to post (unless it comes from the QM.) In my accent whale/wail and whet/wet are pronounced differently. I pronounce the h. Why do you have a problem with people posting that their accents don't adhere to the IPA rules? I enjoy reading all the different ways people pronounce the same words. It's educational.The instructions for this quiz say that the words must sound the same. I agree with others above who said anything otherwise should be stated in the instructions. Just curious, under your source are whey and way homophones also?
+1
level 58
May 23, 2018
Some of these were hard because I don't pronounce the two words the same. E.g. chased and chaste, I have just a bit more of a "t" sound in chaste. I did eventually get them all. I always hated the word "jamb" for some reason. Then again, I guess silent B's are pretty unique, eh?
+2
level 68
Jun 17, 2018
Wale rhymes with wail. Neither is an exact homophone for whale. But a very enjoyable quiz!
+1
level ∞
Jun 17, 2018
Correct "wh" pronunciation:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ZmqJQ-nc_s
+3
level 58
Sep 17, 2018
Correct is insulting. Saying the common pronunciation is better. There are dialects and accents that traditionally use the aspirated "H" in /wh/ pronunciations still. And since you like websites... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pronunciation_of_English_%E2%9F%A8wh%E2%9F%A9
+2
level 74
Sep 17, 2018
I agree with gatorsong, and I looked at the website. Their map of the southern US is missing a lot of territory in the upper south where we still use the "hw". I've never heard anyone say "wale" for whale. Apparently the whine-wine merger completely passed us by.
+1
level 52
Sep 17, 2018
Surely ‘torte’ should be accepted?
+1
level 67
Sep 17, 2018
Agreed - and 'tort'.
+2
level 69
Sep 17, 2018
Yup, taught, tort, taut, torte - all homophones. The dessert (preferably chocolate or lemon) is what sprang to mind first :)
+1
level 33
Sep 17, 2018
17/24... Below average, but I guess it's decent for a non-native speaker.
+1
level 48
Sep 17, 2018
Can't "vet" be accepted for "wet", or short-forms aren't included? Please clarify. Thanks, and nice quiz.
+1
level 57
Sep 17, 2018
They start with two different sounds.
+1
level 52
Sep 17, 2018
"V" and "W" so not sound the same in any native English accent I have heard. However, I suspect short forms are not included as in another quiz in the same series "bi" was not a correct answer for "buy".
+2
level 63
Sep 17, 2018
In Wyoming, tot would be correct for taut.
+1
level 40
Sep 17, 2018
Good one. Canada here, and I agree. (So does Merriam-Webster http://www.learnersdictionary.com/qa/pronunciation-symbols-and-variants-for-the-vowel-sounds-in-tot-and-taught)
+1
level 60
Sep 17, 2018
Agreed.
+1
level 52
Sep 17, 2018
Damn jamb! >:-(
+1
level 57
Sep 17, 2018
Always surprisingly difficult since they give you the answers already.
+2
level 81
Sep 17, 2018
whale|wail and wet|whet are not homonyms. the pairs rhyme, but if you lookup the phonetics for whale and whet they start with a slight h /(h)/ sound that wail and wet do not have.
+1
level 49
Sep 19, 2018
Yeah, I was like, what/wat?
+1
level 57
Sep 19, 2018
How about aisle and I'll?
+1
level 24
Oct 11, 2018
I've only ever pronounced lien as lee-en (it's alternative phonetic pronunciation) so couldn't get that one.
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