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Idioms about Dishonesty

Fill the blanks in these idioms about dishonesty and theft.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedAugust 6, 2013
Last updatedAugust 6, 2013
Times taken4,993
Rating3.92
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Idiom
Lie through one's teeth
Stretch the truth
Cook the books
Five-finger discount
Smoke and mirrors
Under false pretenses
Barefaced lie
Idiom
Caught red-handed
Fly by night
Lead up the garden path
Pull a fast one
Taken for a ride
Pull the wool over one's eyes
A snake in the grass
Idiom
Cock and bull story
Feather one's nest
Grease someone's palm
Ill-gotten gains
Crooked as a dog's hind leg
Pulling one's leg
A tall tale
+1
level 59
Sep 23, 2013
20/21, should have cheated...
+1
level 72
Sep 11, 2014
But did you really get 20?
+1
level 61
Oct 1, 2019
noone will believe you anymorenow
+2
level 66
Sep 23, 2013
Never heard of bare faced lie. Bold faced lie maybe.
+1
level ∞
Sep 23, 2013
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lie#Barefaced_lie
+1
level 58
Dec 16, 2013
I've never heard bold-faced, just barefaced and baldfaced.
+1
level 80
Jul 2, 2015
bare-assed is what i've heard most.
+2
level 70
Jun 1, 2017
Heard bald-faced mostly, though I've also heard bare-faced. (since both are synonymous) Bold-faced is simply a common mistaken repeating of what someone thought they heard. (similar to "hone in", when it should be "home in"....people lack comprehension, and repeat something that is actually merely close to what they heard)
+1
level 61
Oct 1, 2019
hone makes sense though, since it means refine, make more precise, get sharper (and later on also more focused).

Edit: read up on it a bit more and as I read it, both are accepted, and one only appeared about 10 years (documented version as always in these cases, you are never sure when things Actually were used in speech, only when they first appear in written sources) after the other. So nearly simultaneously, or better yet got altered from early on.

+1
level 53
Sep 23, 2013
Well the dog's hind leg was a new one to me. Got all the others although not sure what that says about my character!
+1
level 51
Sep 23, 2013
Kept trying taken for a fool.
+1
level 53
Dec 11, 2014
Me too, but that wouldn't be an idiom since its meaning is literal, not figurative.
+1
level 66
Aug 4, 2015
Taken for a fool is no different than under false pretenses. Just because it's true doesn't mean it's not an idiom.
+1
level 69
May 24, 2019
I tried fool and chump
+1
level 56
Sep 23, 2013
Can you accept a tall story as well please?
+1
level 32
Sep 23, 2013
In Texas it's called a bare naked lie or bare assed lie
+2
level 66
Aug 4, 2015
Never heard "lead up the garden path." I've heard "lead up the wrong path." Oh well. Still fun. :D
+1
level 74
Dec 22, 2015
I'd assume it's British in origin. It's very familiar to me. :)
+1
level 65
Apr 19, 2018
That's the first idiom I've missed on all the idiom quizzes I've taken. I kept putting primrose. Never heard of "lead up the garden path."' I haven't found a really convincing backstory for this idiom yet, either, as different sites have different backstories.
+1
level 61
Oct 1, 2019
Then you havent searched, type it into google and you get millions of hits explaining it and the origin and everything you would want to know about it.

this is what I found in 30 seconds (first 2 hits): "Up the garden is used more frequently in the United Kingdom, while down the path is used more frequently in the United States. But both are correct." So not just UK. And: The first known published occurrence of 'lead you up the garden' is in Ethel Mannin's 'Sounding Brass' (1926)

+1
level 61
Oct 1, 2019
after looking a bit longer also found these references. So far there doesnt seem to be anything from before 1920's on record. Though the use of the sentence in some of these sentences indicates that it has been around a bit longer.

There is another quote from 1925, this one from minutes of a meeting: "I shall try very carefully not to follow the Chairmans's lead this morning. He was leading me up the garden a little" – it is from Commission on Food Prices: First Report, with Minutes of Evidence and Appendices, H.M.S.O., 1925

and:Hansard has a number of early references, such as this one, 1926: 'if I may use a vulgarism, he is trying to lead his supporters "up the garden." link

(huge text, use ctrl+f to find the sentence with garden)
+1
level 75
Jan 23, 2018
The expression 'Cock and bull story' originates from my home town :)
+1
level 52
Oct 19, 2018
got 100%... must have bad blood, or something...LOL