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Irregular Plurals Quiz #2

Based on the plural, guess the singular forms of these words.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedMay 15, 2014
Last updatedNovember 14, 2018
Times taken21,833
Rating4.39
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Plural
Singular
Teeth
Tooth
Dice
Die
Alumni
Alumnus
Bacteria
Bacterium
Genera
Genus
People
Person
Criteria
Criterion
Plural
Singular
Data
Datum
Media
Medium
Foci
Focus
Paparazzi
Paparazzo
Phenomena
Phenomenon
Brethren
Brother
Lice
Louse
Plural
Singular
Hooves
Hoof
Salmon
Salmon
Dormice
Dormouse
Pence
Penny
Vertices
Vertex
Ova
Ovum
Viscera
Viscus
+1
level 59
Jun 30, 2014
Long story short: In order to speak English, you have to speak Latin (and Old English).
+1
level 66
Jun 30, 2014
and its nothing compare to the speaking of French..
+3
level 29
Jun 30, 2014
Pronounced as its written? The last letters of every word are just there for funzies
+1
level 76
Sep 30, 2015
But German is such a mouthful, whereas if you learn the rules for French you barely have to say anything, seeing as there are so many similar sounds and half the letters aren't voiced.
+2
level 24
Jan 15, 2016
Spanish is the easiest languages of all to pronounce. Think about this: we speak English and we have trouble spelling many words, while children in Spain learn to spell perfectly within a few years. There are rules for how things are pronounced in Spanish.
+1
level 69
Aug 29, 2016
Among European languages I think Spanish and Italian are the easiest in terms of pronunciation. I think Italian probably more so than Spanish from an English speaker's point of view, as Spanish has a few more tricky sounds (such as the rolled 'r' and regional variations such as yeísmo), but I think of all languages Japanese is probably the easiest I've encountered. Which is good, because it is nightmarishly complex in every other way.
+1
level 72
Oct 17, 2016
Agreed that Spanish is the easiest to pronounce and spell. Every letter in each word is pronounced. English, not so much. Latin, Greek, German, Old English, Middle English, and on and on.
+2
level 81
Oct 17, 2016
You guys haven't tried Finnish yet. One letter - one sound. Whatever letter you put next to it doesn't change the sound. The only exception is the combination ng (and nk). Spanish is much harder in comparison.
+1
level 67
Oct 18, 2016
What sillie said! If you listen to Finnish people who don't pronounce English that well, you'll notice they all speak it pretty much the same way. They are pretty much pronouncing the words as they appear written (also known as 'rally English', made famous by Finnish rally & F1 drivers). :) But yes, Finnish is super super easy to pronounce.
+1
level 57
Mar 3, 2018
Hungarian also has a simple letter to sound correspondence. Any Spanish or Italian word can be pronounced correctly once you know the rules but there are some irregularities - for instance sometimes there are silent h's and it is impossible to tell by how a word sounds whether this will be the case. Also the c sound changes, in Italian from k to ch, and in Spanish from k to th, whereas in Hungarian it is always ts.
+1
level 76
Jun 30, 2014
a dash of Spanish, Arabic and a few others wouldn't hurt, either.
+1
level 55
Oct 17, 2016
And French too, and old Gaelic, Norse, Germanic (Saxon). English really is an amazing mishmash!
+3
level 70
Jun 9, 2017
Knowing semaphore helps too.
+1
level 65
Mar 8, 2018
And Frisian.
+2
level 51
Jun 30, 2014
The plural of person is persons. People is the singular for a collective group of persons that share a trait and made plural by peoples. Often times the only shared trait for people is humanity itself, but that does not make it a plural for person. Both person and people are made plural in a regular fashion.
+1
level 76
Jun 30, 2014
That's one way the words are used. However it's also correct to say, for example, "are you the only person there or are there two or three people?" The clue is not incorrect. Words in English are often used in more than one way.
+1
level 51
Jun 30, 2014
@kalbahamut I generally find your arguments very well thought out, but in this case I could not disagree more. It is not a matter of opinion or how the words are used in casual speech; it is a matter of definition. One would be hard-pressed to find a dictionary that lists the plural of person as people, or the corollary, that the singular of people is person. People and person are etymologically unrelated words, except that they both have Latin roots.
+2
level 21
Oct 17, 2016
@wolfcat95 kalbahamut is correct that both "people" and "persons" are suitable plurals for the word "person". Both terms are correct, but are used in different circumstances. "Persons" is to refer to the plural of "person", but can be easily defined with a particular number. However, "people" is used when accounting for more than 1 person, but is not easily countable. Source: http://www.dictionary.com/browse/person?s=t
+1
level 76
Oct 18, 2016
Thank you, Chaos. That's what I was saying.
+1
level 50
Jun 30, 2014
Was going to write the same thing.
+1
level 38
Jul 1, 2014
People is the plural for person, and you will find it listed as such in dictionaries. Terms such as "persons" and "peoples" have fairly distinct connotations/usages different to using people as the plural of person. "There were thousands of people/persons at the concert." If you are a native speaker of English, which would you choose? People is clearly correct in this instance. "There are a number of people/persons of interest in this case." Again which sounds correct to you? In this particular usage "persons" would win out. Persons is not the usual plural form of person - it is only used in specific instances.
+1
level 75
Jun 30, 2014
Enjoyed this one. Another one, please?
+2
level 42
Jun 30, 2014
Irregular plurals? Half of those weren't irregular but just regular Latin words
+2
level 76
Oct 17, 2016
I think the majority of them were regular plurals in other languages.
+1
level 55
Oct 17, 2016
But how many people in the world "regularly" speak Latin these days, besides in the Church or in some science fields? I'd say Latin words in general are QUITE irregular these days, haha. Vale!
+1
level 52
Oct 19, 2016
Exactly. Not irregular at all, just come from other languages.
+1
level 73
Jun 30, 2014
And here I thought the singular or plural of Paparazzi was scum or vermin. Oh well.
+2
level 68
Jul 3, 2014
Mitochondria/ mitochondrion would be great for this quiz.
+2
level 58
Nov 29, 2015
Nice little fishy trick question!!
+1
level 48
Dec 30, 2015
prout
+1
level 66
Apr 22, 2016
Media messed me up a bit. I was thinking about the media (Like TV, newspapers etc.) didn't realize they were talking about psychics until after I saw the answer
+1
level 59
Jul 30, 2019
They werent, and psychic didnt even cross my mind. Media is a collectively term, seperately each is a different medium, tv, radio, newspaper article.

Also in art the different materials you use are medium/media. Like in "media" they are carriers choosen to get your subject across. In this case the media is more tangible (maybe you heard of mixed media?)

instead of carrier you could also say channel. Maybe that makes the term "medium" a bit clearer for you, he/she is chosen to channel through, as the spokesperson or intermediate to convey a message.

intermediate hah!

+1
level 59
Jul 30, 2019
Btw the plural of the psychic medium is nót media, it is mediums.
+1
level 49
Oct 17, 2016
The vast majority of these irregular plurals are a result of words being introduced from other languages in which pluralization rules are being followed consistently. Other folks here have addressed the sea of Latin words. Usually in Italian - paparazzo - a word ending in 'o' becomes plural by changing it to 'i'. (Feminine words - ending in 'a' become 'e'.)
+1
level 76
Oct 17, 2016
For goodness sake. I got every single one -- even viscus -- but I looked at "foci" and I'm thinking, 'Foe-see. What the heck is fo-see?' Time runs out. Oh, "folk-eye"!
+1
level 70
Jun 9, 2017
It's actually pronounced FOE-sigh. Soft "c".
+1
level 44
Oct 18, 2016
Interesting. I've always called the second item by its plural name, when it was a singular item. I thought they were interchangeable terms. I learn this after 31 years. Other answers I couldn't get even though I know them.
+1
level 54
Nov 27, 2016
nice quiz
+1
level 78
Aug 6, 2018
In French you need to know the ‘gender’ of every single thing In existence before making any sense. (And there no rules like ... “all vehicles are she” for instance.)
+1
level 59
Jul 30, 2019
It is that way in most languages, feminine, masculine or neuter