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Literary Groups of Things

Guess the members of these groups related to literature.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedDecember 16, 2014
Last updatedOctober 5, 2017
Times taken14,880
Rating4.20
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Group
Answer
Epics attributed to Homer
The Iliad
The Odyssey
Brontë sisters
Anne
Charlotte
Emily
Nations from
"Nineteen Eighty-Four"
Eastasia
Eurasia
Oceania
Most famous novels of
Leo Tolstoy
Anna Karenina
War and Peace
Famous writers
surnamed Shelley
Mary
Percy
Dueling clans from
"Romeo & Juliet"
Montague
Capulet
"Lord of the Rings" books
The Fellowship of
the Ring
The Two Towers
The Return of the King
Cities from
"A Tale of Two Cities"
London
Paris
The Three Musketeers
Athos
Porthos
Aramis
Group
Answer
James Joyce novels
A Portrait of the Artist
as a Young Man
Finnegans Wake
Ulysses
Parts of Dante's "Divine Comedy"
Inferno
Purgatorio
Paradiso
Jane Austen novels
(posthumous not included)
Emma
Mansfield Park
Pride and Prejudice
Sense and Sensibility
Female authors first name George
George Eliot
George Sand
Finch children in
"To Kill a Mockingbird"
Scout
Jem
Monsters defeated by
Beowulf
Grendel
Grendel's Mother
Dragon
Most famous English-language
dictionary creators
Samuel Johnson
Noah Webster
Most well-known
"Beat Generation" writers
William S. Burroughs
Allen Ginsberg
Jack Kerouac
+1
level 82
Dec 16, 2014
I am pretty sure I wrote something like: "Portrait Artist Young Man", might have missed some prepositions along the way. Could you accept if those key words are correct? - Also hate: forgetting one Bronte. I was thinking Catherine, not close enough, I know. Also I knew Samuel for the dictionaries, just couldn't remember the last name! Sadly Dante and 1984 are not part of my knowledge. So. Less of a result than I would'we wanted :( -- Love the list quizzes though.
+1
level ∞
Oct 5, 2017
Simply "portrait" will work now.
+5
level 75
Apr 29, 2018
You didn't write Portrait of the Artist as A Young Man, James Joyce did.
+2
level 69
Jan 26, 2015
Like this quiz. Thought I was going to get them all, but I was beaten by the Beat generation.
+2
level 26
Jan 26, 2015
Oops, never thought of Grendel's mother as an answer.
+1
level 61
Feb 9, 2017
I was going to try Grendel's mother but figured they needed a name. I shoulda.
+1
level 69
Apr 29, 2018
I got it right, but was surprised that it worked haha
+1
level 77
Jan 26, 2015
If you'd have accepted English translations I would have gotten Paradise and Purgatory.
+1
level 76
Jan 26, 2015
Ditto
+1
level 43
Jan 29, 2015
I agree, it is a bit paradoxical to call it "Divine Comedy" (in English), but not to accept the English names of its sections.
+1
level ∞
Oct 5, 2017
Purgatory and Paradise will work now
+3
level 65
Apr 29, 2018
But not Hell?
+2
level 49
Jan 26, 2015
Great quiz, with certainly a few challenging parts. It is nice to have something a bit different from the staple film and geography, much though I enjoy those as well. Thank you for taking the time to write this.
+1
level 66
Jan 26, 2015
All I could think of for the beat writer was "That one guy who shares a last name with the guy who wrote Tarzan..."
+4
level 76
Jan 26, 2015
Curious as to why you didn't allow Austen's two novels which were published after her death. She completed them, why not credit them to her?
+1
level 68
May 1, 2018
Because the quiz was hard enough as is...
+3
level 48
Jan 26, 2015
What about the Dubliners for James Joyce novels?
+1
level 43
Jan 30, 2015
Northanger Abbey (her 1st novel) and Persuasion for Jane Austen?
+1
level 71
May 11, 2015
This is true, but both were published after her death.
+1
level 67
Apr 29, 2018
I wish a non-White person had written something. Just once.
+3
level 79
Apr 29, 2018
I’m just gonna walk right past this obviously confused person... just forgot my keys...
+2
level 67
Apr 29, 2018
Let me make it more plain for you. I wish White people would recognize that non-White people have written books.
+4
level 79
Apr 29, 2018
You mean white people don't recognize people like Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Malcolm X, or even Alexandre Dumas, who wrote the Three Musketeers?
+3
level 70
Apr 29, 2018
Antiquity: The Vedas, the Mahabharata, the Ramayana, the Epic of Gilgamesh, (the Bible), the Quran, The Art of War, the works of Confucius and Laoze are widely recognized by "White people" as great pieces of literature. Middle Ages: Avicenna, and if you want to include them, One Thousand and One Nights. Modern Times: What Jacktheguy said. Also, Haruki Murakami, Khaled Hosseini, Kazuo Ishiguro, and many more. The prosperity and global dominance of Europe/North America explain why it was easier for white people to attain the necessary education and leisure time to produce literature. Things of the past like slavery and more pervasive racism may explain why it used to be extremely difficult if not impossible for notable non-white authors to emerge in Europe/North America until rather recently. It's not as if American slaves had written works of the same literary magnitude as War and Peace, and now white people refuse to acknowledge their achievements.
+2
level 67
Apr 29, 2018
That's great - and there's lots more besides. The two of you have nothing other than a biography from sub-Saharan Africa; little other than works of non-fiction from Arab, Indian, and Chinese writers (the Thousand and One Nights a notable exception; Khaled Hosseini a pretty weak exemplar). Black Americans are better represented. You can add any of the Chinese classics: Journey to the West (Monkey); Outlaws of the Marsh; Three Kingdoms; the Jin Ping Mei; or the Story of the Stone. Throw in anything by Lu Xun. Or China's poets. How about Murasaki Shikibu or Natsume Soseki - merely as representative of Japanese literature? India: Rabindranath Tagore? Narayan? Any of the Persian poets: Rumi, Nizami, Hafez, Omar Khayyam... Munif, Mahfouz, or Tayeb Salih from the Arab world. Achebe, Okri, Soyinka, Adichie - from Nigeria alone. But barring the partial case of Dumas, where is any of this in this quiz? And it's not only this one. Check the literary quizzes throughout this site.
+4
level 70
Apr 29, 2018
"I wish White people would recognize that non-White people have written books" - which is clearly the case. Your last statement is closer to demand an all-encompassing and biasless canon. White people live predominantly in North America/Europe. This means that they are better equipped at understanding literature from these continents - hence the better representation of African Americans. Black American authors are much better understood by fellow Americans than Black Nigerians. Should it be surprising that people from vastly different regions, with different environments, religions, histories and so forth, do not form one kind of balanced literary canon? It would be a Herculean task for any culture (or whatever it is you file "White people" under) to even approximately represent the works of other cultures in their canon. And I wonder if any "culture" in history besides the current "White" one has ever stressed diversity so much as a value in itself.
+1
level 67
Apr 29, 2018
I appreciate your thoughtful responses. I think you underestimate the importance of imperialism and the de facto existence of a "global" literary canon that ignores non-European (and Euro-American, etc.) literature. I don't think that there's any great appreciation of diversity in the West. By the way, the person who may have inspired your screen name - Albert Camus - was a great writer who never came to grips with his own colonial identity and role. He was famously unable to create anything approaching a developed Algerian character (I'm excluding Pieds Noirs), despite Algeria being the setting of his most famous novels.
+3
level 77
Apr 29, 2018
I wish people would stop being so obsessed with fallacious social constructs. The value of something you do or it's cultural/historical/literary significance is in no way tied to your skin color.
Would also be nice if people stopped overestimating the importance of imperialism and trying to blame it for everything.
+3
level 67
Apr 29, 2018
Well, it would be nice if people wouldn't swallow their world view, fully-digested, from hegemonic sources. It's a bit rich to criticize anyone's application of imperialist theory when you don't actually think it's an ongoing thing.
+2
level 70
Apr 29, 2018
tshalla: I'm glad we're on friendly terms. I acknowledge that the global dominance of Western countries (one could summarize this as imperialism) is pervasive. It is the framework of our thinking. But perhaps we should shine a light on other aspects of that framework, too. I ask this sincerely: apart from the modern West, has there ever been a society where it was even feasible to think of diversity as a value in itself? Have there ever been other societies that, at least in theory and partially, declared it to be a good thing if different cultures/ethnicities are included "under one roof" and treated equally? With all honesty, I can't think of one. Oppression has been the historical standard. Concepts like diversity and inclusion are relatively new, and I see them advocated by immigrants to Western countries, but hardly in their countries of origin. In a strange (dialectical?) twist, imperialism may have paved the way for diversity, as a crucial basis to start think globally.
+2
level 77
Apr 29, 2018
Not seeing something that's not there is not a personal failing. And you're projecting, tshalla. How much information do you get from sources that don't agree with your extremely slanted and peculiar worldview? And how much of that information do you not immediately dismiss as being part of imperialistic hegemony? You sound just like a Flat Earther, Creationist, or Illuminati conspiracy theorist. The world can't be trusted because it doesn't agree with your irrational prejudices and biases.
+1
level 67
Apr 30, 2018
So let's see, if I say that the twin foundations of U.S. history are the theft of half a continent from its indigenous inhabitants and the bond-servitude of African (let's see, how does article 1, section 9 of the U.S. constitution put it? Oh yes-) imports, then that makes me like a creationist? Like a flat earther? Fascinating. This just in: not everyone sees the world in the way of the hegemonic (don't be lazy - pick up Gramsci) tale told in U.S. history classrooms. And thank god - small g - for that.
+1
level 57
Apr 29, 2018
I only got 16, which is less than the average; but I was one of only 8% who got William Burroughs. I have one book, 'My Dreams: An Autobiography', which I have read 3 times. Rather than write an ordinary autobiography of his waking life, Burroughs documents all the dream he has written down during his life, some of which are recurring. And you can imagine, someone like William Burroughs has had some pretty strange dreams. Burroughs tried to experiment with writing and take it away from being a representative, linear artform in much the same way modern art has moved away from pure representation. And its a bit of a shame only 8% of quizzers know who he is. As for the questions on 'To Kill A Mockingbird', 'Romeo and Juliet', and '1984', I read those books so long ago I just could not remember those details.
+5
level 79
Apr 29, 2018
Did you know Tolstoy was originally going to call his famous novel "War, what is it good for?" It was actually his mistress that insisted he name it "War and Peace."
+1
level 55
Apr 30, 2018
^ I want to like this comment 1,000,000 times.
+1
level 73
Apr 30, 2018
Can you believe Seinfeld will have been over for 20 years next week?
+1
level 55
Apr 30, 2018
Great quiz. I did horribly and only got 23 correct. I definitely need to bone up on the classics.