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Math Vocabulary

Based on the definitions, guess these words from the world of mathematics.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedSeptember 11, 2013
Last updatedOctober 18, 2015
Times taken35,980
Rating4.25
4:00
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Defintion
Word
Five-sided polygon
Pentagon
Opposite of concave
Convex
Concept represented by the ! symbol
Factorial
Number that has no factors
besides itself and one
Prime number
Three-dimensional version of a circle
Sphere
Quantity that represents both a
speed and a direction
Velocity
Angle of less than 90 degrees
Acute angle
Type of average; the most
common value in a set
Mode
The longest side of a right triangle
Hypotenuse
Triangle in which all sides
have different lengths
Scalene
Defintion
Word
Two-dimensional version of a line
Plane
What this symbol represents: ∑
Summation
The bottom number in a fraction
Denominator
Point where lines meet
in a polygon
Vertex
Ratio of a circle's circumference
to its diameter
Pi
The set of positive integers
Natural numbers
Tetrahedrons and Dodecahedrons
are types of this
Polyhedron
10 to the 100th power
Googol
Square roots of negative numbers
Imaginary numbers
Number that cannot be expressed
as a fraction of two integers
Irrational number
+2
level 66
Sep 19, 2013
How much I have forgotten :(
+1
level 75
Jul 2, 2014
High school math was a LONG time ago.
+3
level 44
Feb 2, 2016
Wait a second... Where are you from? USA probably :D I live in Serbia, and we learned 90% of these in elementary school.
+4
level 65
Feb 2, 2016
Dear Serbian Smartypants, I'm sure he only meant high school math class was the last time he had to use these concepts, not that it's where he first learned them all. Arrogance isn't attractive.
+3
level 44
Feb 2, 2016
sorry........... But isn't it sad that he didn't use that after high school? :'(
+3
level 75
Feb 3, 2016
In the first place, Eurocrum, I'm a she not a he, and in the second place I was a social worker and then a stay-at-home mom, neither of which had a lot of call for math vocabulary, especially since my kids were brilliant and didn't need help with their homework. And in my younger days in the 1950s and '60s, many of those terms weren't taught until high school if even then. Some of the terms on here we were never taught - factorial, natural numbers, summation. I am amazed now to look at the math homework of my younger grandchildren. They are doing math we never heard of until higher grades. I think that's a great thing and I wish I'd had the chance to learn more. But there's no need for you to be arrogant because you know more than I do on the subject.
+1
level 71
Feb 3, 2016
I find most serbians are jerks. Relax serbians I am just making a callous generalization the way eurochem did. I only know one serb and he's pretty cool.
+2
level 44
Feb 4, 2016
yeah, i apologize. Kids have to learn more today, and if you ask me, they should learn even more :)
+1
level 58
Jul 13, 2016
high school math is a LONG time ahead!
+7
level 61
May 17, 2018
I really hope you realize that you all sound arrogant. It's these kind of comments that deter me from going on JetPunk. Most of it is just people saying their age and their time and bragging about it, people attacking others who said the wrong word and someone takes full offense for that, or some sexually biased crap that makes it look like users of JetPunk are sexually biased into thinking women aren't allowed to get 100% on a quiz. I'm not insulting Quizmaster and his policies, but I'm warning that even JetPunk can turn out like Facebook.
+2
level 34
Oct 6, 2013
a point in a polygon is not always the vertex..
+1
level 73
Oct 14, 2013
I read that the same way i think you read it...the "point" that is being referred to is the tip where two line segments meet, which is a vertex of the polygon. The way i read it was just some random point on a polygon, which is just a point. Needless to say, i got it wrong.
+1
level 49
Oct 17, 2013
"Quantity that represents both a speed and a direction" should be velocity, not vector.
+2
level 69
Oct 17, 2013
Velocity is a type of vector, I think.
+1
level 49
Oct 17, 2013
Yes, velocity is indeed a vector, but not every vector measures speed and direction. A vector could just as easily represent displacement (distance and direction) or acceleration and direction.
+1
level 75
Jun 23, 2015
Agree with Scuadrado - a vector is a magnitude and a direction, which can represent a number of real-world (and theoretical) phenomena - acceleration and force are two real-world examples.
+1
level ∞
Oct 17, 2013
Changed the answer to velocity.
+2
level 59
Oct 17, 2013
And velocity questions belong on a physics quiz not a math vocabulary quiz.
+1
level 49
Jan 27, 2014
Agree with martryn
+1
level 58
Jul 7, 2014
You could change the clue to read "magnitude" rather than speed. Then the correct answer would be vector.
+1
level 58
Aug 1, 2014
You could stop the circle-jerk of semantics and just take the quizzes. Obviously if you're that well informed, this quiz doesn't pose much of a challenge to you anyway.
+1
level 58
Jul 13, 2016
@PorcNBeanz
Physics is very similar to math, with a tad bit of science added in there, so I think it belongs there.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Math and physics are one and the same. The only difference is that math isn't constrained by reality.
+1
level 56
Jun 9, 2018
Physics is a subset of maths.
+2
level 64
Oct 17, 2013
Lines are two-dimensional in and of themselves. Also complex numbers should be acceptable as well as imaginary numbers.
+1
level 50
Jan 9, 2014
"Lines are two-dimensional..." No they aren't. :)
+2
level 48
Oct 30, 2014
points have no dimension, lines have one, and planes have two. Think of how many numbers it takes to specify your position if you were within the entity in question. You're either on the point or off it, so you don't need any number to tell you where you are; you can be on a line at point 4, or -36.845, or any spot specified by one number that tells you how far along you are; and the plane takes two numbers.
+1
level 45
Dec 20, 2015
Man, I was taught that a line was two dimensional in school. No wonder I turned out so bad at math!
+1
level 36
Jul 30, 2017
Well a straight line isn't! You'd need two dimensions to define a curve though.
+1
level 66
May 16, 2019
@GameKitty maybe what they were trying to say was that a line drawn on a board or on a piece of paper does in fact have some width (and technically some depth as well even though its just a layer of chalk or ink) which makes it kind of 2 dimensional. but the mathematical definition of a line is something that only has 1 dimension.
+1
level 50
Jul 17, 2014
How many sides does a circle have? Two, silly, an inside and an outside!
+1
level 58
Jul 13, 2016
And that is exactly why they are two-dimensional.
+3
level 65
Feb 2, 2016
A plane is not really defined mathematically defined as a "two dimensional version of a line" but a flat, two-dimensional surface.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
A line is a one-dimensional surface, so it logically follows that a plane is a two-dimensional line.
+1
level 49
Jan 19, 2017
Amen to this. It is a two-dimensional surface. A line can be found on a plane. A line is NOT a plane.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
The square root of a negative number is in fact complex, but so is the square root of a positive number, so that would be a really vague answer (like accepting "that one country" on the Countries of the World Quiz)
+1
level 12
Oct 17, 2013
The mode isn't always the average. The average is the median. 2, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12. The mode in that sequence is 2, but the average(median) is 6.
+3
level 37
Oct 17, 2013
Neither of those are the average. The mode is the most common number and the median is the number in the middle of the data set. The MEAN is the average.
+1
level 37
Oct 17, 2013
http://www.purplemath.com/modules/meanmode.htm This site explains mean, mode, median, and range.
+2
level 56
Jun 9, 2018
Range is not an average. Mean, median and mode are but "average" most commonly refers to the mean.
+3
level 72
Mar 31, 2014
"Type of average" != "average always." Please actually read carefully before commenting...
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
There are multiple types of averages. There are the mode, median, arithmetic mean, geometric mean, harmonic mean, and possibly others I don't know about. None of them are THE average - they are all AN average.
+1
level 56
Jun 9, 2018
There are a great many different types of mean. Quadratic mean is probably most common after the ones you listed - you square all the data, take the arithmetic mean of that and then take the square root. E.g. To find the quadratic mean of 1, 2 and 2, you square then all: 1, 4, 4. Take the arithmetic mean of that: 3. Then take the square root: √3.
+1
level 56
Jun 9, 2018
In fact, given any smooth one-to-one function from the positive numbers to the positive numbers it is possible to construct a mean based on that function. The functions for different means are: Arithmetic Mean: f(x) = x; Geometric Mean: f(x) = log(x); Harmonic Mean: f(x) = 1/x; Quadratic Mean: f(x) = x^2.
+1
level 56
Jun 13, 2018
Actually any one-to-one smooth function from the positive numbers to the real numbers works, as log x will not always be positive.
+1
level 36
Oct 17, 2013
If you liked this one, see how many of the names of polygons you remember. http://www.jetpunk.com/user-quizzes/10371/name-that-polygon
+1
level 65
Oct 18, 2013
Could you accept "polyhedra"?
+1
level ∞
Oct 18, 2015
Okay
+1
level 32
Oct 18, 2013
To be pinickity, i is called THE imaginary number, and numbers of the form a + bi are complex numbers. So the answer "imaginary numbers", strictly speaking, is wrong. At least set it to accept complex numbers and I will be satisfied
+2
level 49
Oct 19, 2013
Actually, it's not wrong. You're correct that numbers of the form "a+bi" are called "complex numbers", but square roots of negative numbers take the form "bi" and are all called "imaginary numbers". i is the "imaginary unit".
+1
level 49
Oct 19, 2013
For more, try my quizzes: Arithmetic Vocab, Large Numbers, Polygons.
+1
level 19
Oct 21, 2013
Aren't square roots of negative umbers also called complex numbers?
+2
level 38
Oct 23, 2013
You should accept Platonic Solid for "...Tetrahedrons and Dodecahedrons...". I got so hung up on these being 2 of the 5 platonic solids that I figured I was spelling platonic wrong! Polyhedron is correct of course, this is just an alternative.
+1
level 71
Jun 9, 2014
Yes! Yes! Yes! Could not believe it was not taking platonic solid, but went on to try platonic regular solid, platonic forms, regular solid, etc.
+1
level 32
Aug 16, 2014
yes, this!
+1
level ∞
Oct 18, 2015
Platonic solid will work now
+1
level 68
Nov 3, 2016
"Perfect solid" should also be acceptable.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Thank you for assisting those of us who overthink math questions :)
+1
level 32
Mar 9, 2014
Shouldn't it say 'right ANGLE triangle'?
+2
level ∞
Oct 18, 2015
No
+1
level 72
Feb 2, 2016
yes
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Right triangle = triangle with one right angle...
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
The term is not widely used in the UK. But I think the meaning is fairly clear.
+1
level 66
May 1, 2014
Pretty sure I typed "googol" but didn't accept (maybe I put "googal"), but got it with google. Good quiz, though! :D
+1
level ∞
Oct 18, 2015
Googol works
+2
level 77
May 7, 2014
There is no such thing as the square root of negative numbers. The square root is a function defined from the positive numbers to the positive numbers. No analytic continuation to the negative number is regular. Imaginary numbers are numbers whose square is a negative number and no, it's not an equivalent definition.
+2
level 77
May 7, 2014
As for those who say the answer should be "complex numbers", that's wrong. The square of any complex number is a complex number (for example : (1+2i)²= -3 + 4i ). It's only the pure imaginary numbers that give negative numbers.
+1
level 72
Feb 2, 2016
Isn't it a complex number with zero real part?
+1
level 77
Feb 3, 2016
Not all complex numbers are imaginary, thus "complex number" can't be accepted for this question (which should still be corrected, by the way, everytime I read that, my eyes bleed).
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
Technically I think Arp is correct. In the field of complex numbers for every complex number z there are actually two complex numbers a such that a^2 = z. In the case of -1 these numbers are i and -i. It is possible to define a function, however, that is defined from the complex numbers to the complex numbers that could reasonably be called a square root - and it is the solution x to the equation x^2 - z = 0 with either the greater real part of if both real parts are the same the greater imaginary part.
+2
level 71
Jun 9, 2014
Perhaps reflects my advanced age, but we learned the positive integers as 'counting numbers'. Counting number in wikipedia redirects to natural numbers. COuld you add that in? And as mentioned above, please accept platonic solid - or make one of your examples an irregular polyhedron.
+2
level 48
Oct 30, 2014
I tried "counting numbers," too. Never did get to "natural numbers."
+1
level 72
Jun 30, 2014
Please also accept the alternative spelling hypoteneuse (see http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Hypoteneuse)
+1
level ∞
Oct 18, 2015
Okay
+1
level 7
Sep 21, 2014
Im a 6th grader and I aced it
+1
level 59
Dec 1, 2014
Fun Quiz right up my alley ... completed with 2:01 remaining :^) NICE!!!
+1
level 38
Dec 15, 2014
It's Maths not math!
+1
level 76
Feb 2, 2016
No, it's definitely math.
+1
level 78
Feb 2, 2016
We call it math in America.
+1
level 75
Jan 19, 2017
I'll give you aluminium which is much easier to say than aluminum, but I think we win on math which is easier to say than maths.
+1
level 70
May 2, 2017
All those extra letters in non-US English....why, oh why?
+1
level 56
Aug 10, 2018
Wuee jgousste poutte echsxtorra leittreesse inne wheereverre poussiabble twoo maeikke ourrsselvesse pheeylle soupperrioure.
+1
level 66
Jun 23, 2015
As a math major, I'm depressed that I missed one. I haven't used scalene triangles in quite a while though, to be fair.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Stuff like "scalene" is useless vocabulary that you shouldn't need to know; you just need to know the actual math behind it. Whoever thought they had to create some fancy word just to define a triangle with sides of different lengths was out of their mind.
+1
level 58
Jun 23, 2015
In the expression a/b=c; c is called the quotient; a is called the dividend, and b is called the divisor, a is also called the numerator and b is also called the denominator. Quizmaster should accept divisor as well as denominator.
+1
level 15
Jun 23, 2015
2:31 im 12 beetch
+1
level 27
Jan 14, 2016
Please accept 'sigma notation' for summation
+1
level 56
Feb 2, 2016
Tetrahedrons and dodecahedrons are actually "regular polyhedrons," since they both have congruent edges and faces, and only a few other polyhedrons fall into that category. Please accept that answer as well.
+1
level 78
Feb 2, 2016
Fun quiz. The bottom number in a fraction can also be called the divisor. Perhaps you should accept this as well?
+1
level 79
Feb 2, 2016
Please accept counting numbers. Many include 0 in the definition of natural numbers, but counting numbers can only be nonnegative.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Natural numbers never include zero
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peano_axioms Read the first axiom in the section on formulation.
+1
level 75
Jan 19, 2017
0 is included in whole numbers, not natural numbers.
+1
level 77
Feb 2, 2016
Sorry to repeat myself, but seriously, an imaginary number is a number whose square is a negative number, not the "square root of a negative number". That may seem to be equivalent, but it's not. Of course, you have to know a bit about functions to understand that...
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Of course, it actually is equivalent. This is a commonly accepted fact that is taught everywhere. Every number has two roots, and every negative number has roots that are imaginary.
+1
level 56
Jun 22, 2018
You can define a square root of k as a root of the equation x^2 - k = 0. Then imaginary numbers are square roots of negative numbers. A square root is not always a function.
+1
level 35
Feb 2, 2016
Could you possibly accept transcendental as well as irrational for numbers that can't be expressed as fractions of integers? Or am I using that term wrong?
+1
level 77
Feb 2, 2016
Transcendantal numbers are numbers which are not a root of a rational polynomial, and are thus only a subset of the irrational numbers.
+1
level 77
Feb 2, 2016
I also don't like that definition of a prime number, because it doesn't clearly exclude the case of 1 ( 1 is NOT a prime number ). The correct, though less explicit definition, is simply to say that a prime number is a number with exactly two positive divisors...
+1
level 47
Feb 2, 2016
1/20. Would have scored 6/20 had I been able to answer in Dutch. Mathematics was never one of my fortes...
+1
level 32
Feb 5, 2016
3.14 should be accepted for "Pi", as well as,"median" for most common value in a set, and maybe "vertix" for vertex and "Hypothenuse"
+2
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Now, on the other hand, a much better approximation would be 16*arctan(1/5) - 4*arctan(1/239).
+1
level 47
Feb 5, 2016
Complex Numbers for imaginary numbers
+1
level 24
Feb 5, 2016
square roots of negative numbers can also complex numbers pls consider that
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Every real number is also complex. It's too generic.
+1
level 77
Feb 6, 2016
TheButcher, Deekei : No. Just bother to read the above comments about that, please...
+1
level 55
Feb 8, 2016
This quiz has the least fun comments section I've ever seen on JetPunk.
+1
level 76
Feb 19, 2016
It's hard to make math fun. Even harder to make maths fun.
+1
level 58
Jul 13, 2016
It is extremely hard to make math fun, but there are some very interesting parts to it, but those are what mathematicians haven't discovered yet, sadly.

Was this a joke? Math and Maths are the same subject right?
+2
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
Math is always fun! Yay math! Also physics. Yay physics!
+1
level 76
May 17, 2018
Maths is like math but more of it.
+1
level 55
Jul 14, 2019
One math plus one math is two maths :) Now that's Mathematics for you ;)
+1
level 58
Jul 13, 2016
Not too hard, thanks!
+1
level 67
Nov 3, 2016
In my life I've only used 8 of these facts for any worthwhile purpose. The rest have been stored away in my brain , since my schooldays, like an old book in a library that nobody reads .
+1
level 55
Jul 14, 2019
Some of my books have become illegible, or gone missing ( someone return them please?) Many are dusty.. but are legible again after a little dust off
+1
level 78
Nov 3, 2016
I would like to add to the cause of counting numbers. It's been nearly 30 years but I distinctly remember those terms being synonymous and the world of google tends to agree.
+1
level 52
Nov 3, 2016
I would consider adding "square" for two-dimensional line. I've spent some time learning about hypercubes, and the example everybody always uses is that a point is 0 dimensions, a line is 1, a square is 2, and a cube is 3. Going off of this example, the logical answer for "two dimensional line" would be a square. I eventually did get plane as the right answer, but I still think square should be added as a type-in.
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
Technically you should replace line with "lime segment".
+2
level 58
Dec 1, 2018
That's what you put on your Corona.
+1
level 56
May 17, 2019
Good point. Line segment was the intended phrase.
+1
level 33
Nov 24, 2016
I'm 10 so I got 8
+1
level 44
Jan 11, 2017
2:59 first try. Helps being a maths major lol.
+1
level 17
Jan 19, 2017
You already changed this - but to clarify, polyhedron is singular and polyhedra is plural.
+2
level 44
Jun 7, 2017
I never learned the sigma as anything but sigma, nevertheless a summation. Perhaps, sigma should work?
+1
level 58
Sep 18, 2017
can hypothenusa be accepted ?
+1
level 50
Nov 3, 2017
For the question: "Tetrahedrons and Dodecahedrons are types of this" could you please make the answer "prism" an acceptable answer? Thank you!
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
A tetrahedron isn't a prism. A dodecahedron can also be a prism, but it is not a type of prism.
+1
level 28
May 2, 2018
To be pedantic, a "Three-dimensional version of a circle" is a 3-sphere (a 3-dimensional hypersphere). A normal sphere has only two dimensions: e.g. latitude and longitude. While spheres are often embedded in 3-dimensional space you can also embed a sphere in 4-dimensional space, so it's not really saying much.
+1
level 56
May 17, 2018
A circle is defined as the set of all points in a plane that are a fixed distance from its centre. A sphere is the logical continuation replacing a plane with 3-dimensional space. You can embed a sphere in 4-dimensional space but it will no longer be the set of all points a fixed distance from the centre.
+1
level 52
Sep 14, 2018
The original commenter is technically correct; an ordinary "sphere" is actually a 2-sphere, a 2-dimensional surface embedded in 3-dimensional space. A 3-sphere would actually be embedded in a 4-dimensional space. A more accurate answer would probably be "ball," which refers to not only the sphere but also the space enclosed by the sphere.
+2
level 56
Sep 15, 2018
That is the case in topology. But the most natural definition for a circle in Euclidean geometry requires two dimensions, and a sphere would be the result in three dimensions. The circle itself, though, is I suppose one-dimensional. A ball would be the three-dimensional equivalent of a disc.
+3
level 79
May 17, 2018
Typed 1 with 100 zeroes and it didn't work. Disappointed.
+1
level 32
May 17, 2018
A two-dimensional version of a line is a line. Did you mean 3 dimensional?
+1
level 56
May 18, 2018
A line is one-dimensional. A two-dimensional shape has the up-down and the left-right dimension, but a line only has one: along the line.
+1
level 55
Jul 14, 2019
think of length height and width. A line only has length. A sheet got two of those and a wooden beam for instance has all 3.
+1
level 39
May 17, 2018
Hmm, hard when you're not native English. Got 16/20, but I was typing 'regular solids', 'faculty, facultation'. 'irreal numbers, complex numbers'. Never heard of Scalene.
+1
level 48
Jun 27, 2018
Got all of them first try, lol, I'm a math nerd.
+1
level 52
Sep 14, 2018
Strictly speaking, the object commonly referred to as a sphere is only two-dimensional (while a circle has only one dimension). The answer "ball" should also be accepted; the space bounded by a 2-sphere constitutes a three-dimensional ball: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ball_(mathematics)
+1
level 85
Nov 25, 2018
10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 should be accepted as an answer to 10 to the 100th power
+1
level 30
Nov 30, 2018
the question "two-dimensional version of a line" is incorrect because a line is already in two space, whereas a plane is only used in 3-space.
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2019
2-space is a plane.
+1
level 55
Jul 14, 2019
A plane is on x and y axis, and zero on z axis. It has no vertical height.
+2
level 85
Dec 19, 2018
Please consider accepting "cylinder" for "three-dimensional representation of a circle." I understand why sphere is more widely answered, but I would argue that not only is a cylinder a three-dimensional representation of a circle, but that it is also a better answer to the question as it really only is a circle extruded over a third dimension rather than a circle rotated around an axis.
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2019
A circle is defined in 2-dimensional space as the set of all points that are a given distance from the circle's centre. If you replace 2-dimensional space by 3-dimensional space you get a sphere.
+1
level 45
May 16, 2019
Add depth to the circle to get a cylinder. Add depth to a square and you don't always get a cube. It can be a rectanguloid. "3-D circle" is not good enough.
+1
level 33
May 16, 2019
complex numbers is also an acceptable answer for square root of negative numbers
+1
level 56
May 17, 2019
Imaginary numbers are a subset of the complex numbers. No complex numbers that are not also imaginary numbers are ever square roots of negative real numbers. So imaginary numbers are the correct answer.
+1
level 38
May 16, 2019
Would you consider accepting 'counting numbers' along with 'natural numbers'? Thanks for checking.
+1
level 45
May 16, 2019
This is not a very well informed math quiz. Even after years and years, its still not good. 1) A three dimensional version of a circle doesn't have to be a sphere. It could be a cylinder 2) I would argue that a "two-dimensional line" is a line.
+1
level 49
Jun 9, 2019
Well, I've not even heard some of these terms before! However, I've done pretty well in life without needing them x