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Most Livable Cities

According to a 2017 Mercer survey, these world cities have the best quality of living. How many can you name?
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Answer Stats
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Continent
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% Correct
Your %
+1
level 59
Feb 11, 2014
Not surprised that many European cities are on the list as other surveys state that many people are "very satisfied" with living in the central - north region. But I question some of the choices. Can't imagine Berlin to be that liveable to make it on the list. Been there once - might have some nice areas but overall? Not that great. And what kind of people took the survey? Munich is very expensive. Maybe it's liveable for people who love small flats or got the matching cash.
+1
level 32
Oct 29, 2015
This was my fist impression of Berlin, too, when I visited it for a week during a school trip. But now I've been living here for three years and I absolutely love it. The city has huge amounts of green, the different districts are so different you get the impression of living in 10 cities at once and the cultural, scientific and entrepreneur-scene is huge. There is lots of diversity, be it people, food, ways of live, entertainment..On top, you can live like you want, wear what you want and just be yourself and no one judges you. I cannot imagine ever leaving again.
+11
level 65
Mar 21, 2014
I'm not surprised at the choices, but you have to bear in my mind that "most livable" usually translates to "most boring". Apart from Berlin, I wouldn't want to live in any of those cities - I need the excitement, the entertainment, the party scene of places like Paris, NYC, Tokyo, Bangkok. Those cities are probably not "livable", but they are with Life. On the "boohooo-America's not number one" issue - your country should really get into it's head that some of it is nothing more than the Third World. There are ghettos - both urban and rural - unlike anything you'd ever see in Europe. To have such a concentration of abject poverty and ignorance in the richest country of the world is a disgrace.
+4
level 70
Jan 23, 2015
Yes, Yes, and Yes. Well said!
+1
level 65
Sep 15, 2015
Fail. /facepalm.
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
oh yeah... Moldova is SOOO much nicer than Malibu. Nobody is boo hooing... we're just laughing at how dumb you Europeans are for making statements like this.
+5
level 65
Nov 3, 2015
And who the hell said that Moldova is nicer than Malibu???
+3
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
and if it's so shameful to have such poverty amongst such wealth you ought to be ashamed that paramedics and school teachers in Ukraine are making $60 a month while Luxembourg has a GDP per capita north of $100,000 USD. That's obscene. Nothing even close to that level of disparity exists in the USA. Not denying that the US has problems- just stating the obvious that your hatred of the United States and obtuse jingoism makes you say some crazy things.
+11
level 25
Sep 17, 2017
kalbahamut Why are you acting like Europe is a single country?
+3
level 27
Nov 4, 2017
kalbahamut You do realize that merely two to three decades ago Ukraine was a communist wasteland? A more proper comparison would take place over a hundred years from when the Ukraine will join the EU. At that point, I'm very positive that they will have caught up.
+3
level 73
Nov 4, 2017
Who said it was a single country? Gandalf said that there are urban and rural ghettos in the United States unlike anything you'd ever see in Europe. Which is absurd. It's also silly to compare countries in Europe with the USA as a whole... makes more sense to compare US states to European countries. But that's beside the point as I was responding directly to Gandalf's ludicrous but predictable comment.

As to the unfairness of acknowledging that Ukraine exists... whatever... the American South is still recovering from being burned to the ground in 1865. If Ukraine is incorporated and recovered faster than Mississippi... great, good for them. We'll see. But this is hypothetical. and probably the entire continent would be in much worse shape currently if not for the Marshall Plan. So, you're welcome.
+1
level 52
Nov 4, 2017
Kalbahamut, I agree with you to some extent, but about the Marshall plan, I believe the USA could afford it because it made money off the world wars that happened to a great part in Europe. Plus the Marshall plan was a way for Americans to make sure Europe had money to buy there stuff.
+1
level 73
Feb 27, 2018
Of course it was in America's interest to rebuild Western Europe. That doesn't change the fact that they did.
+1
level 27
Mar 25, 2018
kalbahamut Oh come on. The Marshall plan again? You guys act as if you single handedly rebuilt Europe. Look at the numbers, your credits (~130 billion dollards in today's currency) accounted for a mere 3% of the national product of the supported nations. I've read papers that suggested that the plan added about half a percent of economic growth p.a. in Western Europe over the span of a couple of years. Sure, it was a contribution, but looking at growth rates from 5 to over 10% I'd say it was negligable in the grand scheme of things.
+3
level 28
Oct 30, 2015
Gandalf. There are loads of places in Europe that are terrible. London has beautiful areas, with nice houses, parks etc but also houses that are slums, rented out to people who have no choice. House prices are astronomical and first time buyers can't get on the property ladder, even to buy a terraced house. I like to visit, but would hate to live there. It's the same in many areas of the UK and we are also considered to be a rich country, just like America. There are a lot of countries in Europe who should also be ashamed, as many of their people are living in abject poverty.
+1
level 65
Nov 3, 2015
I absolutely agree.
+2
level 30
Nov 2, 2015
Third World America? We have poor people but they happen to be the richest poor people in the world. They're all on instagram showing off their bling. But go ahead and keep thinking America is such a bad place. Hopefully that'll stop people from the rest of the world from wanting to come here.
+3
level 65
Nov 3, 2015
I didn't say America was a bad place, I said that in a rich country, the abject poverty that still exists should be considered absolutely shameful. But I guess denial is easier than doing something about it.
+1
level 39
Nov 4, 2015
There are lest 47 million people living in poverty in the USA.
+1
level 69
May 14, 2017
There will always be somebody living in poverty because you can't have the top income without somebody being at the bottom -- unless you want to evenly distribute income so everyone is equally poor but the US is not communist. Also, the poverty in the United States is still a higher standard of living to most everywhere else in the world.
+2
level 55
Sep 25, 2017
eh, as a Melburnian I like the party scene here...
+1
level 7
Nov 4, 2017
Melburnian here, even though I stay indoors all the time I hear it's pretty crazy. I guess we're just not in the media enough to get into this guys mind haha
+1
level 24
May 6, 2014
I think "livable" simply tries to present an average value from a set of features that are desirable to most people, like low crime rate, clean water, clean environment, affordable housing, good educational opportunities, general health, transportation, ... and more. At least, that's how I think Mercer usually gets to those results. As an Austrian, I'm certainly biased about Vienna, but it does indeed have a great standard of living. As do many of the other cities on the list - speaking for the ones I've actually been to. I wonder if the crime rate (sadly) excludes most American cities. I live in New Orleans, and they have more murders a year (400,000 people living in the metro area) than all of Austria in a year. Plus a whole lot of other problems ... but that's a different subject. I still love it.
+1
level 24
May 6, 2014
Frequency / severity of natural catastrophes could also play a role ...
+2
level 58
Jan 20, 2015
This all seems so arbitrary.
+2
level 59
Feb 18, 2015
Fresno is nice.
+3
level 70
May 15, 2015
I love reading these comment sections. Everyone here is so cuddly. I love you guys.
+2
level 40
Jan 1, 2017
It is better than the silly quiz itself, agreed.
+1
level 45
Sep 16, 2015
I have been to many of these cities, and fully agree with the top-20. Perhaps Oslo and Dublin could be in it, although they are #31 and #34.
+1
level 76
Jan 14, 2018
Oslo is WAY too expensive.
+2
level 70
Oct 29, 2015
No Singapore? I bet by 2017 it will be included....
+2
level ∞
Jan 14, 2018
Wow, you're right!
+1
level 44
Feb 13, 2018
They finally got their Durian fruit problem under control.
+1
level 40
Oct 29, 2015
Should add the Monocle and Economist answers to the list. Interesting to see the big 3's different opinions. And to all those saying where are all the Asian and American cities, a big part of what makes a city livable to surveys is their health and safety statistics, public health service and pension or superannuation policies. Most Asian cities fail in these areas horribly, as does the US in many ways.
+1
level 74
Oct 29, 2015
I think whoever wrote this list has never lived in Ottawa. Just saying.
+1
level 51
Dec 15, 2016
Haha true, the cold is so unbearable at times that it calls livability into question!
+2
level 46
Sep 25, 2017
Ottawa isn't much colder than say, Stockholm. I think it's perfectly livable.
+1
level 37
Jan 16, 2018
you are weak canadians calling ottawa cold. come to winnipeg and experience a real canadian winter.
+1
level 77
Jan 17, 2018
I would call Winnipeg an extreme Canadian winter, not a real one. You have the coldest spot in the country1
+1
level 72
Jan 14, 2018
I think it's very livable. I've been biking to work for the last six years -- never having to risk my life in traffic -- using the bike paths through the Central Expermental Farm and up the Rideau River, or along the beautiful Ottawa River. In the winter I skate on the Rideau Canal before work. Four seasons, I use the walking trails in the Greenbelt and go to the beaver dam, where I feed chickadees out of my hand. All summer long, I can see horses whenever I want by biking down Woodroffe to the farm at Fallowfield, and I can see cows by biking to the Experimental Farm at Baseline and Merivale -- the middle of the city! I bus to Algonquin College all winter on the city's dedicated buses-only Transitway. Ottawa is green, affordable, and a great place to bike, has three rivers/canals in which to canoe or kayak, four triathlons a year, several nice beaches, and the world's largest outdoor skating rink. The Rideau Canal is even a UNESCO World Heritage Site. What more do you want?
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
Have you? Ottawa isn't a perfect city (public transportation is bad, but the OTrain's coming soon), but it's still a nice place to live.
+1
level 67
Oct 29, 2015
imo only cities worth living in are copenhagen and stocholm...pizz on the rest
+3
level 22
Oct 29, 2015
Americans seem to have trouble with the fact that their country isn't the glittering paradise they want it to be. If y'all would stop shooting each other more of your cities would be on this list
+2
level 53
Oct 31, 2015
Plus you stand a good chance of going bankrupt if you get sick. And it costs a fortune to go to college.
+1
level 69
May 14, 2017
Your ignorance is astounding. On a percentage basis (I just took the countries with the most murders by percentage quiz), the US is one of the safest and just because news organizations like to sensationalize shootings doesn't mean they are happening everywhere -- just more in the cities with the most strict gun laws (ie, Chicago). As for not a glittering paradise, that doesn't exist anywhere in the world. Frankly, I wish more people would look at that list and move to those cities instead of still flocking to the US.
+3
level 72
Jan 14, 2018
How many of the countries on that list were European? When you limit it to the "Western" countries you should want to compete with, the US is one of the least safe. There's a reason why there aren't a lot of people from Norway trying to move to the US. People from the non-so-called-s#&@hole countries are already safer, happier and, in many cases, wealthier than Americans.
+1
level ∞
Jan 14, 2018
America has its problems, that is true. But how come we aren't spending more time talking about Belgium's flaws? Last I checked the whole country was falling apart.
+3
level ∞
Jan 14, 2018
Raise your hand if you think "Manneken Pis" is the most over-rated tourist attraction in Europe.
+1
level 68
Jan 18, 2018
I've been so happy to see your recent stance on Belgium. It's about damn time someone finally spoke up about that waffle-infested cesspool and its Flemish hipsters.
+1
level 74
Jan 23, 2018
Belgium is not falling apart, but I agree for the statue. As for samiamco's comment, I won't even bother answering.
+1
level 65
Feb 13, 2018
I don't know, man - the waffles, the chocolate, the mussels, the fries, the beer...
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
America is full of morons, sure, but thanks for stepping up Scuba Matt and proving that the rest of the world has more than its share.
+2
level 73
Oct 29, 2015
I haven't visited many of the cities on this list. Only 3 to be honest. Amsterdam, Berlin, and Toronto.
I would definitely consider living in Amsterdam. Cool city. I would put up with the terrible climate to try living there for a while. I would definitely pass on Berlin and Toronto. Of the cities that I have not visited on the list, I think I would like to try Vienna, Zurich, Geneva, Copenhagen, Sydney and Melbourne. Stockholm maybe if I got to live somewhere else at least 8 months out of the year. The rest... no interest in at all.

And, for me personally, I can think of at least several hundred cities I would prefer to live in over any of these. Mostly in East and SE Asia, Latin America, and the United States. Europe and Canada are very overrated. I hear good things about Australia but I've never been there before so can't comment.
+1
level 65
Apr 15, 2016
I don't know what it is you feel is overrated about Canada, But Australia is very similar to Canada in my opinion as a Canadian who lived in Australia for over a year. Main difference is obvious, climate. But culturally, and in terms of the way the cities look and feel, they are very similar.
+1
level 46
Sep 25, 2017
I completely agree, they are very similar except climate.
+1
level 65
Apr 15, 2016
And as a Torontonian who has done a bunch of travelling, even I feel like it's placement on the list is a little high. As far as cities go, there's nothing wrong with it, but I've been to a few cities that I think would be way nicer to live in.
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
Climate is very important to me. That is one difference. Maybe the cultural differences are minor but for whatever reason I tend to get along much better with Australians than Canadians. Again, I've never visited Australia, so I can't really say how much I'd like it there for sure and I'm only speculating. I also haven't spent that much time in Canada.
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
Update: I've now been to Vienna, Munich, Copenhagen, Amsterdam, Berlin, Toronto, Hamburg, and Stockholm.

In general my opinion of these places, versus my expectations prior to visiting them, has been revised down.

I would like to reiterate the paramount importance of climate. So many of these German and Scandinavian cities are dark, dreary, rainy, and frigidly cold- not what I would call livable. I was in most of them in the summer and they were still unpleasant.

I'd also like to double down on the cost of living thing. It makes a huge huge difference. When it costs $95 for a bunk bed in a hostel dormitory in Zurich, and $30 for a high-rise condo on the beach in Odessa with floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the Black Sea (I've stayed in both)... this makes a difference in your quality of life. People who can afford to live comfortably some place like Albania or the Philippines would literally be bums if they were transported to Switzerland.
+1
level 59
Feb 13, 2018
If you were in Scandanavia during the summer, how can you call them dark, when it´s only dark for a couple of hours during the night? I grant you, that it can rain a lot, but on a sunny summer day, we are able to jump into the harbour and canals for a swim in the middle of the city, because the water is so clean here in Copenhagen. I´d also like to point out that it´s extreme heat is not something everyone enjoys. For me, if the weather is above 25 degrees celcius and sunny, I´d rather stay indoor, if I´m not able to go for a dip in the water. Summer rain on the other hand is awesome. The winters here are quite warm compare to the latitude and we rarely see any snow in Copenhagen.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
I said "so many," and meant the following list of adjectives to be interpreted to mean that some of these apply but not all. Most of the summer days I spent in Stockholm were pretty pleasant. The sky *never* getting dark in Vilnius (I was there in June) was perhaps a bit too much light, actually. I found this unsettling. But the cities further West, many of which make the list, were often overcast with cold drizzly rain even on days with a long period of daylight. Also, I said I was in "most" of them in the summer. Some I visited in late Autumn. So I know how quickly those long summer days disappear.

I know my taste in climate isn't equal to everyone's. Just speaking to my own preferences.
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
Dating scene, people, entertainment, culture, food, etc. also really important. DrunkenGandalf in one of his rare moments of clarity was absolutely right when he pointed out most of these places are boring.

Brief impressions of each:
1. Vienna: dreary weather. Beautiful downtown. Nice architecture. Nice open public spaces. Otherwise a bit dull. Wouldn't want to live here.
2. Munich: amazing food. Attractive women. Very expensive by German standards. Germans in general though are uptight. Might consider living here briefly.
3. Copenhagen: Scandinavia is so overrated but this place is alright-ish. Too expensive but cheaper than further north. Most absurd bridge toll I've ever seen in my life. Don't think I'd live here.
4. Amsterdam: too expensive and cold but as stated previously still one of the places I like most in Europe. Would live here for a while.
5. Berlin: reasonably cheap for Western Europe. Less boring than most of these cities. A bit dreary. Maybe
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
6. Toronto: haven't been here since I was a child. I don't really know. I just remember that Niagra Falls was much nicer on the Canadian side of the border.
7. Hamburg: a bit sleazy, and if you're into that sort of sleaze... you won't get your money's worth here. Plenty of scams and rip-offs. But much cheaper than nearby Amsterdam and Copenhagen. Some parts of downtown are okay. Met some surprisingly friendly people, for Germans. But wouldn't want to live here.
8. Stockholm: I thought I would like it. Was disappointed. Nice, but.. Very anti-septic. Very dull. Don't really care for the culture overall- some good some bad. Hate how car-hostile downtown area is. Insanely expensive, though not as bad as Norway. People are a bit stand-offish. Good food. Well stocked groceries. Some nice museums. Wouldn't want to live here though, even in the summer. Can't imagine how awful it would be in the winter.
+2
level 72
Sep 16, 2017
So let's have your top 10 livable cities then chap.
+1
level 73
Nov 4, 2017
nafe: ...I don't feel like ranking them but in no particular order: San Francisco, Seattle, New York, Washington, Honolulu, Bangkok, Cebu, Tokyo, Seoul, Singapore, Hong Kong, Jerusalem, Odessa, Chiang Mai, Pattaya, San Luis Obispo, Orlando, Amsterdam, London, Thessaloniki, maybe Manama, maybe Moscow or St Petersburg (would have serious reservations about the weather, though), maybe Paris.

I've never been to Spain. Never been to Australia. Never been to Costa Rica. You can see my travel map in my profile. I have a feeling I'd like some of those places.
+1
level 11
Dec 3, 2017
kalbhamut: Clearly this all opinion because even on my TRAVELS I found Bangkok to be crowded and disgusting, Orlando to be Florida at it's most dreadfully boring, and San Luis Obispo to be so unremarkable it felt like I was in purgatory. I found Honolulu to be a plastic disneyland with some of the worst slums in a US capital (big mistake choosing to walk around without a guide) , and you haven't even picked my most liveable/nicest city in Israel (tel aviv), and that place is smaller than Maryland. Every other city here is fun for a vacation, but incredibly expensive or even flat out dangerous, i.e. relatively unlivable as an expat. Some of your choices I agree with, (Washington etc.) but you've still clearly picked cities here based on their constant glorification, or simply size/amount that they are mentioned. I guess you're the type of person to look for some sort of adventure, or you're a "sunbathing on the beach" type person, but I can't possibly imagine you doing that every day..
+1
level 11
Dec 3, 2017
I live in Toronto, and have lived in Berlin for an extended period of time, and I know that I can't necessarily judge any other cities' living conditions (because I haven't "lived" there lol) but to me, it makes sense why these cities would be picked. I'm not the smartest, most politically versed guy, but I reckon that they're just picked the largest cities in some of the best COUNTRIES. Southeast Asian and central american countries are poor as dookie, unsafe, while Canada and Scandinavian countries are realtively well off, and have some of the best, most progressive, benificial policies ever, that benefit the citizen. But, hey, if you like your warm weather...
+1
level 72
Jan 15, 2018
Pattaya? Dude... I'm of the opinion cities in general aren't particularly livable, handy for work and fun to visit, but I miss the open air and space. That said, with the exception of Barcelona and Madrid (both great to visit) Spanish cities are wonderful places if you can find a job.
+1
level 60
Jan 16, 2018
car-hostile = people-friendly. That's what makes a city liveable. @kalbahamut
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
mob: "Clearly this all opinion"... yeah... I'd hope that this was clear.

dbyeti: my car is an extension of myself.
+1
level 56
Feb 13, 2018
I thinking you're getting confused between nice cities to live in and nice cities to visit. Because one city has a lower cost of living, may mean that you find it not expensive, especially coming from a more affluent country. But the moment you live there and earn the wages of that city, than that argument goes out the window.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
^ that really depends on how you live and I can think of plenty of situations where my argument is still firmly on this side of the window. Consider..
#1 someone who is retired or semi-retired and living off of savings.
#2 someone who works from their laptop making the same wages and doing the same work regardless of where they sleep at night.
#3 someone whose experience or skill set allows them to find good well-paying jobs virtually anywhere, even in "poor" countries where the locals might have depressed wages.

Then also consider the fact that in most of these "affluent" countries, getting work can be considerably more difficult. Economies of these countries tend to be more protectionist when it comes to jobs and their workforce. There is often a lot of bureaucratic red tape involved in getting a work visa. You may have to work illegally if you want to work at all, and likely accept lower wages.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
On the other hand in many "poor" countries foreigners can expect to receive salaries far above what locals are paid because their skills may be more rare and in demand and the local employers understand that the foreigners are used to receiving a higher salary. Maybe you won't get paid quite as much as you would in Switzerland... but you might still get paid 2-4x what a local could expect to get for the same work and given the lower cost of living, live quite comfortably on that.
Taxes in these countries are typically substantially lower, as well.

In summation, no, I'm not confused at all. I'm definitely thinking about places I would like to live, not just visit.
+1
level 47
Feb 13, 2018
You're forgetting some very basic bits that play a huge role in quality of life, like access to healthcare and education, pollution, working justice system, crime rate, work culture (wages, hours, benefits), equality, human rights. It's not just about how nice a city is for a tourist or an ex-pat but about what your chances in life would be if you were born in one of the cities at random (possibly as a poor, orphan girl, or a boy into a rich family). Also, Scandinavia might be a bit cold and dark in the winter but we rarely have any heat waves where the temperatures climb over +30C for long periods of time (well, it didn't even reach 25C once over here last year), no earthquakes, tornadoes, extreme flooding, extreme cold/snowstorms, drought etc. Clean water and air for all and so forth.
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
I'm not forgetting any of that. I'm not a tourist. I am a nomad. I've actually lived many of these places. And you're wrong about it not being what life is like for an ex-pat.... that's actually *exactly* what Mercer's list is about. They are not ranking quality of life for poor orphans.
+1
level 1
Feb 13, 2018
To me, it's seems obvious that this survey takes the accounts of the regular people who live in these cities, not an expat who'll have much more money than some guy or girl living there. Obviously, it would be great for us to live in Costa Rica or Thailand or whatever. But maybe that for ordinary people living there, it's not that nice because they could not afford what we could. But sure, they have nice weather.
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
That's exactly wrong. Mercer's list is ALL about a city being an attractive place for expatriates. It has NOTHING to do with being born there.
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
european cities are better adapted to living not just tourism, american cities are better suited for tourism than european cities but european cities are better at accomodation
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
I think you've actually got this precisely backwards. Many European cities, and some entire "countries" (see: San Marino) are all about tourism and little else. There aren't many places like that in the United States outside of Orlando.
+1
level 66
Oct 29, 2015
It all depends on what one calls 'liveable'. I have visited just about all of these cities and lived in a few, and several not mentioned but mentioned by jet-punkers. For my two-penneth worth the most liveable city I found in years of travelling and working is Adelaide in South Australia. Not too crowded, not too expensive, great year round temperature with a beautiful Autumn and Spring to add variety. No long freezing cold winters with snow and slush . Low crime rate. Close to good beaches. Great sporting facilities. World class broadband internet. Festivals and shows. Short distance to several wine growing areas such as Barossa Valley, Wonderful Adelaide Hills for scenery and English style countryside. Roads not too crowded compared to many listed. Possible to walk around without feeling threatened 'Day & Night'. Great food grown locally and hundreds of top class restaurants including all terrific ethnic types .... That's why I live in the Adelaide Hills... I could have gone anywhere
+1
level 73
Oct 29, 2015
yeah exactly. Everybody's got different ideas about what they would want or need out of a place they called home. Mercer's very narrow and to-many-irrelevant list of criteria doesn't give a very comprehensive view at all. They just focus on a few data points, some of which are not important to many people, while at the same time ignoring many other very significant factors... and then slap the overbroad label "livability" on it... so they end up with a crap list. I mean, OBVIOUSLY, with any list like this so crowded with European and Canadian cities, climate and weather was not considered at all. And that's a huge factor for most people. Monocle's list consider's climate. Mercer's does not. Few or none of these lists consider cost of living, which makes a giant difference ($10k in Bangkok will afford you a much better life than in Zurich); none of them attempt to gauge (somewhat subjective) things like culture, local cuisine, fun, sexual attitudes, or availability of quality women.
+2
level 50
Oct 29, 2015
availability of quality women???? hellooo??? Am guessing (hoping) that was somewhat tongue in cheek.... Mind you I suppose 'tendency towards unpleasantly sexist attitudes towards women' might contribute to a negative score on my own personal list of liveability so I guess, as you say, it is all very subjective...
+2
level 39
Oct 29, 2015
Just what I was going to say. He could be just trying to be funny but, somehow, I doubt it.
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
Why would that be a joke? Finding partners to have a fulfilling romantic/sexual fulfillment with is a vital component of mental health and emotional/biological contentedness. It could make an enormous difference in someone's life. And yes, it's subjective. Just as you might want to avoid healthy sex-positive people that your perverse worldview forces you to see as unpleasantly sexist, I would similarly want to avoid cities with too many deranged prudes with attitudes like your own. There are cultural, genetic, economic, social and demographic factors at play here. Absolutely worth considering. And the same goes for women.
+2
level 28
Oct 31, 2015
What do you mean? Your comment "the availability of quality women" would be seen by a lot of women as derogatory, as though they are commodities. It doesn't mean they are "deranged prudes", as you so charmingly put it, if women are offended by it. Both men and women want fulfilling, sexual relationships- it's just the way you expressed it in your comment that isn't that nice.
+2
level 50
Nov 4, 2015
What sangfroid said. I'm all for sexual liberation and would def include healthy attitude to sex (as fun, fulfilling, important to sense of contendedness etc etc) in part of my own personal liveability scale. It ain't what you say, it's how you say it. Uptight? Nah, not in real life. But sometimes it feels worth challenging a throwaway comment because if nobody ever does, it's easy to end up in a society where treating women (people) as objects is deemed ok. (@camus, no of course I don't think Kal going to rape anybody...!)
+3
level 39
Feb 20, 2016
Just came across this quiz again and saw the comment about "deranged prudes". This just a typical nasty comment from you. Of course women want good sexual relationships but your comment "quality women" does make women sound like commodities. Are you in a fulfilling relationship? Just wondering.
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
Stein: the women who would see that comment as derogatory are not the sort I'd want to get to know anyway. I speak openly and honestly and without shame about these subjects. I enjoy knowing people who are similar, as rare as they are. Nobody... NOBODY.. would be upset by a woman saying she would like to live somewhere with quality men, eligible bachelors, or a lively dating scene. It's not objectifying anyone it's stating something about your own needs matter-of-factly. I'm not sexist and don't believe in double standards, so I'm not going to tiptoe around this just because I know people will overreact.

Helen: you've proven time and again you are not worth responding to. I'm only nasty to those who go out of their way to deserve it. You've left plenty of undeserved nasty comments on my own quizzes.
+1
level 66
Sep 25, 2017
Reminds me of Jane Austen's 'Pride and Prejudice;.......“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife”
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Haha... I can't remember the last time I lamented the fact that I just had way too much money. Next time I do, I'll find a wife. Problem solved. :)
+1
level 20
Feb 13, 2018
Nobody cares how much money you have. So I don't understand why you had to mention that but ok ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
The Pride and Prejudice quote was Elizabeth's tongue-in-cheek comment to her sister regarding their mother's comment when her mother learned a wealthy young man had just moved into their neighborhood, and Mother Bennett immediately began scheming to get one of her daughters married to him. So, Kal, perhaps you'd also better add "lack of scheming mothers" to your best city requirements. :)
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
These lists are always so arbitrary, anyway. When I was young my list would have been much different than it is today as a retiree, and when raising our children it would have been yet a different list. Now I'd rate highly any place that has low taxes, cheap living, good transportation, happy people, good medical care, good air and water, and no mosquitoes or buffalo gnats/black flies. If anyone finds that place, please let me know. (Unfortunately, some of those requirements cancel each other out.)
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
SuperCat, I used this website with some of my students in Virginia. Maybe you would find it helpful.
+1
level 20
Mar 1, 2018
OMG YES HAHA. This is the best thing ever. Thanks for sending me to a reading website. I can finally read how ridiculous you sound XD. I appreciate it very very much, lord praise you. XD
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
Nope. Still not getting it. Keep practicing.
+3
level 22
Oct 29, 2015
If the list were 70% American cities you'd be applauding mercer for being geniuses. I'd bet my bottom dollar on that. But since it has no American cities it's irrelevant and narrow-minded
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
Please let me know where I can go to collect your bottom dollar, then.
+1
level 37
Feb 13, 2018
I've been to cities in america. there nice but not nice to live in. plus the people are just so rude. hence why 4 canadian cities made the list none from the USA.
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
How many of those cities did you live in?
+1
level 56
Feb 13, 2018
It's that laughable health care and gun toting idiocy that keeps the U.S. low on the list.
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
No.... nope... I looked. "gun toting idiocy" does not appear anywhere on Mercer's list of criteria. I did find it however on the "Bigot's Guide to International Stereotypes." Maybe you got the two guides confused.
+1
level 16
Oct 29, 2015
München should work in Munich, and Wien should work in Vienna.
+1
level ∞
Oct 29, 2015
Okay
+2
level 53
Oct 29, 2015
From Wikipedia: "The cities — 221 in total — were evaluated on 39 factors including political, economic, environmental, personal safety, health, education, transportation and other public service factors." So until US cities can solve the issues of gun crimes, car pollution/lack of public transport, universal health care and free/cheap education, I can't see how any US city can be considered livable.
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
Right that's why millions of people go to great lengths to move there every year to live. It's just impossible to do so and they are looking for a challenge. Between constantly choking on smog, walking because the BART system is completely broken down, all the while dodging bullets on Fisherman's Wharf as it's practically a warzone, how could anyone possibly live in San Francisco? It's inconceivable!

Meanwhile in the real world, some of my European friends who have actually visited the United States tell me they're amazed they can go out walking in the city and get back home and the bottoms of their shoes are still clean. I lived there 30 years and never once witnessed a violent crime take place. I received so much in federal and state financial aid during college I made a profit. and public transport in many cities is perfectly fine.
I don't especially want to live in the US, but seriously, you people are hilarious.
+3
level 53
Oct 30, 2015
Not sure why Americans get so upset about this. When you look at the scores, the difference between Vienna (108.6), Stockholm (104.5) and San Francisco (103.0) are very small, meaning that most Western developed cities are generally quite livable (New York gets a base score of 100). This is particularly true when comparing to the most livable cities in the Middle East (Dubai = 87.0) or Africa (Port Louis = 87.7). So not getting to the top of the table doesn't imply that Mercer thinks that people getting shot daily at Fisherman Wharf. No need to get emotional here.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
I'm not emotional and I'm not upset about the Mercer rankings. I'm pointing out how incredibly dumb your comment is. As if the cutoff between "among the most liveable cities on Earth" and "can't possibly be considered livable" is 1.5 points. And you seem to be on my side with your second comment. So why are you so emotional?
+1
level 56
Feb 13, 2018
"Right that's why millions of people go to great lengths to move there every year to live." Most people who move to the US come from countries that are less well-off. Is the US more livable to them than the country they left behind? Yes. Is it more livable than a big number of European countries/Australia/Canada/etc.? Nope. I've had two of my friends visit the US before (one of them was on the west coast for 2 weeks, the other on the east coast for a whole month - she stayed at a friend's place). While both liked their time in America just fine, they both said they would never want to live there, for different reasons each.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
CrayCray.. so what? Doesn't change my argument and the fact remains the US receives many more immigrants than any other country on Earth. 20% of all people in the world living in a foreign country live in the United States. Your two friends' commentary doesn't change that.
+1
level 49
Feb 13, 2018
Rent should be taken into account too. How can san francisco be livable if literally nobody can afford to live tehre.
+1
level 73
Feb 14, 2018
biggy: if that were an important factor then almost all of these cities would be disqualified. Have you ever tried to find an apartment in Zurich?
+1
level 65
Oct 29, 2015
Clearly Mercer is comproised of Germans and Canadians. Most biased list I've seen in a long while.
+4
level 74
Nov 9, 2015
Perhaps Germany and Canada are just nice places to live.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
for polar bears and caribou.
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2018
For humans and humans
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
also appealing for bricks, rocks, posts, bags of hammers, and shed-housed tools in need of sharpening.
+1
level 60
Feb 13, 2018
... and Swiss perhaps as they managed to squeeze in their tiny cities :)
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
Naturally, as America is the perfectest country ever to exist
+1
level 65
Oct 29, 2015
Why is Berlin on this list. It is a mess and the amount of poverty and weird people there is unimaginable. It should not even be on the top 500 cities
+3
level 54
Oct 29, 2015
"Weird People" should definitely be one of the 39 factors that Mercer uses to assess each city!
+3
level 56
Aug 21, 2016
What are you? 10? What do you mean weird people?
+1
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
well he's not wrong
+1
level 51
Oct 29, 2015
accept munchen for munich
+1
level 60
Oct 29, 2015
Have you ever noticed that the most developed parts of Europe prefer beer and the ones that are (slightly) less developed prefer wine? The same situation repeats in this quiz.
+1
level 51
Oct 29, 2015
I have seen people on park benches drinking beer or wine! when life is that less developed it doesn't really matter what the alcohol is!
+1
level 67
Oct 29, 2015
Although within these regions, "developed" people prefer wine.
+1
level 33
Oct 30, 2015
Yeah, France is so underdeveloped...
+1
level 60
Nov 4, 2017
Let's look further down the list... Wait... So the places with the lowest alcohol consumption are the least liveable? I'd doubt that's the only factor determining the place on the list. Just as the beer/wine "divide" is likely to have very little to do with it.
+1
level 33
Oct 29, 2015
I think the mere mention of Toronto as a "liveable city" says a lot about the validity of this "study"
+1
level 41
Oct 29, 2015
Basically, live in Germany - or at least that's what people voted/whoever compiled the list thinks well of Germany.
+2
level 51
Oct 29, 2015
Funny as heck, amazing how upset people get because their city or country doesn't get a mention. Get over it. No UK cities and I'm not surprised, doesn't stop people wanting to live here! It is still a great country, survey or not.
+1
level 57
Feb 13, 2018
Lol I'm from Vienna XD
+2
level 61
Oct 29, 2015
Clearly whoever made this list hasn't visited the Turkish-majority districts of Berlin, Dusseldorf, Munich, etc in Germany. Plus, cities like Seattle and Denver are FAAAR cleaner and friendlier than Stockholm and Zurich. Vienna is a nice city though :-)
+2
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
What do you mean? According to drunkengandalf there are absolutely zero bad neighborhoods in the entire continent of Europe. There are no disadvantaged Turks or Arabs in Germany or France. No rough neighborhoods in London. Certainly no child prostitutes standing on the street corners of Kiev, Prague, Bratislava, Bucharest, Constanta, Sofia, Varna, Minsk, Warsaw, well... pretty much everywhere. Definitely no unemployed youth in Spain. Certainly no anarchist riots in Athens. No crime at all in Istanbul, Moscow, or Chechnya. Nope. It's just a blissful utopian paradise from the Atlantic to the Urals the likes of which the sorry saps living in Beverly Hills, Waikiki Beach, Ft Lauderdale or the Hamptoms could only dream of.
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
oh, and probably there aren't any Syrian refugees being literally beaten back by angry women while trying to cross into Hungary.
+4
level 20
Feb 14, 2018
I love how you talk about how much money you have, your good job, but you literally argue with teenagers on a quiz website. XD get a real life.
+1
level 73
Feb 15, 2018
I've never once in my life bragged about how much money I have (I've never had that much), or my good job (I'm currently unemployed)... so.... I think you might want to consult a mental health professional. Also, is responding to bigoted statements and personal attacks directed at you really more pathetic than butting in to a conversation to tell someone they need to get a life because they post comments on a website (via a comment you posted on a website)?
+2
level 20
Feb 16, 2018
1) I literally saw a comment a couple of days ago saying how much money you have. (even look at your country profile - going to nearly every country in Europe? Not many people can do that) 2) What does a mental health professional have to do with me? 3) Clearly, you didn't understand what I said. Y o u a r g u e w i t h t e e n a g e r s o n a q u i z w e b s i t e
+1
level 73
Feb 27, 2018
Stating how much money I have (not a lot) isn't the same thing as bragging about how much money I have. Are you referencing the comment I made years ago to someone saying that I was insane for going to work in Saudi Arabia and I said that it made good financial sense because I managed to save a lot of money there. I saved a hundred grand over the course of six years. That wasn't a brag. This is kind of small potatoes for where I'm from.
Traveling around I have met people who spend as much time traveling as I do for literally nothing. And others who started with about $1000 dollars in the bank and have been traveling for years. It's not that hard. Helps to have a good passport but I know some who have done it coming from 3rd world countries.
A mental health professional obviously has nothing to do with you. If they did you might be making more balanced comments, and perhaps be more self aware. But you're not.
+1
level 20
Mar 1, 2018
Oh, my goodness. "not a lot"? What are you on about? Why does your profile say 61/196 countries visited and 34/50 states visited. NOT MANY people in the world can do that in one life so STOP lying. "If they did you might be making more balanced comments, and perhaps be more self aware" do you really think I care about this? If I was self-aware I'd probably stop arguing with "deranged prunes" XD. But it seems I always get attracted to them which is kinda sad ;/
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
My profile says I've been to 61 countries because I have...... this isn't a brag about how much money I have. I personally have met people more well-traveled than myself who did it for free. I'm sorry that your intellectual disability prevents you from understanding this. I'm not arguing with you. You are ranting hysterically, about prunes (?), and I'm calmly replying with corrections to the falsehoods that, when asked, you cannot back up.
+1
level 20
Mar 25, 2018
I do understand what you are saying, so there's no need to say that I have a disability. I mentioned prunes since you mentioned in another argument about deranged prunes. Or you might not remember that and have dementia? But, do you really expect me to believe that you have managed to get to 61 countries for free? No. Saying to a person you've been to 61 countries is literally saying you have alot of money. You're just a very easy person to argue with because you sound like two 10 year olds arguing.
+3
level 56
Feb 13, 2018
Seattle far cleaner than Stockholm? I live in Vancouver and Seattle is a pig sty compared to Vancouver. I also lived in Stockholm, and I don't know of any war zones in Stockholm, but Seattle and Denver have plenty.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Can we get an "eyeroll" button next to the heart?
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2018
Yes, the eyeroll would be good to use on Kalbahamut.
+1
level 73
Feb 15, 2018
^ ha. the pot calling the eggshell black.
+1
level 30
Feb 16, 2018
I hope you're just joking. The U.S. Dept of State currently has travel warnings to Germany and Denmark, and they should have one for Sweden as well. These once nice places are going down the toilet and we all know why.
+2
level 67
Feb 19, 2018
Yes, because the bigots won't move away.
+1
level 73
Mar 25, 2018
Not saying that Roxy is right, but DB your comment makes no sense.
+1
level 44
Oct 29, 2015
Welp. Missed Geneva and Hamburg. I don't know why. I didn't expect Sydney to be on this list, because there are a lot of shootings there today. Also, I expected Oslo to be on this list. It is expensive, but its liveable ;)
+2
level 50
Oct 30, 2015
How on earth is Auckland the third most liveable city in the world, they're having a housing crisis at the moment
+1
level 66
Nov 11, 2015
And Wellington has far too many hill to be comfortable to live in. I could just be lazy, though... However, that Auckland house crisis thing is a serious issue. In June, Herne Bay (in Auckland) became New Zealand's first suburb to reach an average house price of NZD $2 million.
+3
level 42
Oct 30, 2015
Half Austrian, love Vienna :)
+1
level 57
Feb 13, 2018
I'm from Vienna :D
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2018
One of my favourite cities in the world
+3
level 11
Nov 1, 2015
I can very much see American cities not making this list.
+4
level 56
Nov 17, 2015
Why is everyone so infuriated that no cities from America made the list? It's not that surprising
+2
level 65
Jan 2, 2016
I'dont live in Berlin, but I have been there many times. And it's the worst big city I have ever visited and it's full of beggars and strange people. I was shocked when I noticed that it was on this list. If Berlin is on this list, Damascus could be on here as well.
+4
level 58
Mar 9, 2017
Damascus is a very interesting city. Not sure about most liveable...
+1
level 39
Feb 9, 2016
For the final North American city, I thought of Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha! but not Ottawa, the capital.
+3
level 58
Mar 25, 2016
Surprisingly high number of African and Asian cities.
+1
level 16
Apr 22, 2016
canny hard that but love geography
+2
level 38
Sep 17, 2016
Im surprised that there were 2 NZ ones, i guess NZ is more popular than i thought. Proud to be a kiwi
+2
level 58
Mar 9, 2017
I feel pretty lucky to live in NZ.
+1
level 1
Oct 14, 2016
What I found really interesting about Copenhagen (for those that are thinking of visiting) was Pusher Street, in which homeless people and drug addicts are welcomed into the community. The street is essentially, as the name suggests, an open market for marijuana and has cafes and communal areas. The police seem to turn a blind eye because it's safely maintained and helps a lot of unfortunate Copenhagians. I found it super interesting and would love to see this adopted in more cities.
+1
level 26
Oct 17, 2016
The impression I got from this quiz is that it is useless to have a survey of most livable counties. People consider "livable' in different ways, and every city has got slums and mansions, like it or not.
+1
level 40
Dec 4, 2016
Might want to check your facts. There are 4 Australian Cities in the top 10, and Melbourne has been #1 for 4 years straight.
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
There are multiple organisations that rank this stuff. I know the list you're talking about, and it's different than this one.
+1
level 70
Dec 12, 2016
Briefly looking through the comments, this quiz has the most unenlightened discussion I've seen on the site. Few commenters actually bothering to check the criteria for the list to start with ...
+1
level 20
Jan 20, 2017
So all the countries here are either Europe, Australia, New Zealand or Canada. For some reason this seems a little slanted. I mean, don't get me wrong, those are all definitely very high quality of life locations, but I'm pretty sure that Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka would be up around the level of Munich. I think Singapore might also make the list, depending on the area. The only possible reason I can think of that they'd be lower is the risk of natural disasters, but even those have very little impact on quality of life. Oddly enough, I'd also say Pittsburgh might make it up there. They're nothing like they used to be. Seattle should probably be up there, too.
+1
level 37
Feb 25, 2017
Um... There are no American cities here. I'm not saying the United States is better than everyone, because every country has its flaws and weaknesses. However, American cities need to be on here. I truly do believe our citizens are the happiest.
+3
level 58
Mar 9, 2017
How do you know that???!
+1
level 61
Jan 7, 2018
I thought San Francisco would be worth a mention.
+3
level ∞
Jan 14, 2018
San Francisco is the highest American city on the list, which makes me think the entire list is probably flawed. The average 2-bedroom apartment in San Francisco rents for over $4000/month, making it completely unlivable for 80% of people.
+1
level 49
Feb 13, 2018
Then again, high rent can be correlated with desirability. Not easy to separate those two factors.
+1
level 30
Feb 16, 2018
SF is cool if you like everything vastly overpriced and don't mind all the homeless/panhandlers.
+1
level 30
Apr 20, 2017
Apparently, you're left with only 2 options if you don't like the cold...
+1
level 56
Nov 4, 2017
Which ones
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
New Zealand (?) and Australia.
+2
level 53
May 17, 2017
Technically, Vatican City could be on this list.
+1
level 59
Jan 15, 2018
I am pretty sure that the source did not checked every village with less than 1000 inhabitants. ;-)
+3
level 57
May 26, 2017
WARNING: High salinity levels in the comments
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
It seems to me that for 2017-2018 this has become the favorite comment of people that wish to ignore or diminish valid criticisms.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
I suppose it's a step up from 2001's winner which was calling someone "butthurt." ::shudder::
+1
level 48
Jul 28, 2017
It's pretty bad that none of the most livable cities on the North American continent are American cities. Yeesh.
+3
level 73
Sep 16, 2017
The list was compiled by penguins and polar bears.
+1
level 43
Feb 14, 2018
Penguins aren't native to the northern hemisphere...
+1
level 73
Feb 15, 2018
Turks aren't indigenous to Germany, either, but that doesn't mean you can't find some who would want to live there.
+1
level 43
Feb 15, 2018
Turks are humans and penguins are animals. I haven't heard of penguins wanting to leave the Southern Hemisphere.
+1
level 73
Feb 27, 2018
Given the caliber of individual who feel the urge to respond to some of my comments on this website I feel like Quizmaster's prohibition on ad hominem attacks is draconian, onerous, and unreasonable.
+1
level 59
Jan 15, 2018
Except for those in Canada.
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
bkemp2001 literally said "American cities". Canada is not a part of the US.
+1
level 34
Sep 16, 2017
Lol what is this source, the most liveable city in the world is Melbourne. Secondly, really? Sydney over Melbourne.
+1
level 20
Nov 6, 2017
agreed, after i tried three of the top 10 most liveable cities that i knew for a fact were top 10, and 2 of them appeared outside, i ragequit cause this quiz is plain wrong!
+2
level 39
Dec 15, 2017
Yay, nice to see so many German cities! Although Berlin is a weird and exciting place to live at, I guess it's a nice and liveable City after all.
+1
level 57
Dec 20, 2017
Surprised that there is no cities of France.
+2
level 67
Jan 8, 2018
It would be interesting to see new 2017 data. Violence and rape is out of control in many EU countries now, and I'm pretty sure all German cities will lose their place on this list. If it's not safe for women to go outside alone, I don't think it should qualify as a "livable city"
+3
level ∞
Jan 14, 2018
Have you ever been to Germany? I was there in 2017. It felt very clean and safe.
+6
level 66
Jan 15, 2018
You definetly should rethink your media diet.
+1
level 67
Jan 15, 2018
I spread out my media consumption so I can get a bigger picture of what's going on in the world. I do avoid blatant propaganda outlets like Huffington Post and CNN though. I stick to more fact-based reporting.
+1
level 70
Jan 19, 2018
Not sure what your criteria are for fact-based reporting, but there's something very wrong with them, judging by the end result in your first comment.

Speaking as someone regularly travelling all over Europe and having male and female friends living in many places in Germany and elsewhere ...
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
You watch Fox News?
+1
level 72
Jan 15, 2018
Germany is safe and lovely, by and large everywhere is getting safer.
+2
level 66
Jan 17, 2018
@TinklePork "Violence and rape are out of control in many EU countries now"????? I don't know what news reports you have been reading but in all my time on Jetpunk, that is the biggest load of complete and utter BS I have ever heard. Europe isn't perfect, nowhere is, but your statement is just plain wrong.
+1
level 56
Feb 13, 2018
I currently live in Munich, and I find it the safest city I've been to.
+1
level 42
Feb 13, 2018
Alright pal go back to your echo chamber, this stuff isn't true in the real world,
+1
level 30
Feb 16, 2018
You must be living in an echo chamber of denial or ignorance because it is true.
+1
level 30
Feb 16, 2018
The US Dept of State knows it. That's why there is a travel warning to Germany right now.
+1
level 66
Jan 14, 2018
Zurich more liveable than Bern? That‘s surprising! Bern is smaller, doesn‘t has aircraft noise, isn‘t as overcrowded is Zurich and everything is a bit less expensive. Proud to be a Bernese!
+1
level 59
Jan 15, 2018
Maybe the proximity to the airport is an extra for being liveable? ;-)
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Most of those things are not on Mercer's short list of criteria.
+1
level 71
Jan 15, 2018
Jerry928 may disagree with me but surprised Wellington ranks lower than Auckland on this list!
+1
level 56
Feb 15, 2018
Same here. I don't see auckland as more livable than Wellington except perhaps the climate and some activities or sights, but in terms of most livable I would say Wellington is better than Auckland.
+1
level 58
Feb 25, 2018
Having lived many years in both Wellington and Auckland, I would say... Wellington is more livable, because of better transport. However both are pretty good cities! And Auckland has nicer beaches and climate. But you can't beat Wellington on a good day! :-)
+1
level 43
Feb 8, 2018
Nobody pays attention to Latin America, so we will never see cities like Montevideo, Buenos Aires or even a big brazilian city in these lists. Mostly Montevideo, which provides the europeans with a similar but not so strong climate and a much less chaotic lifestyle, with some cool and again, not so strong, cultural differences.
+1
level 47
Feb 13, 2018
As far as I can see this is an "expat rating" - hence based on the living conditions for a (foreign) family. It's not about fun places to visit for a week or two. I had a brief look at Mercer's documentation. They weigh heavily factors such as air pollution, availability of public transport and affordable schools and health care. That's why you get a bunch of medium-sized German cities on the list, but not a single British one. In Britain, unlike Germany, you have to pay for tertiary education and you have to pay through the nose for public transport.
+1
level 49
Feb 13, 2018
Now all of a sudden, Cologne/Düsseldorf isn't considered 1 agglomeration, like in all other jetpunk quizzes? I typed in Cologne and I see Düsseldorf standing between the answers... (I know they are separate cities but in jetpunk quizzes, they are normally considered 1 metropole)
+1
level 67
Feb 14, 2018
For the purpose of the Mercer list, in some cases it makes more sense to count individual cities rather than whole metropolitan areas. At least one thing they get right.
+1
level 57
Feb 13, 2018
Huh... I wasn't really expecting to see Vancouver here, this is coming from someone who lives there. Housing market is terrible, unless you happen to be a millionaire, and renting isn't even a great alternative because it costs an arm and a leg. But, I guess the fact that we're #5 on the list, and the highest Canadian city shows that we're at least doing something right?
+1
level 54
Feb 13, 2018
Interesting quiz. Metropolis Magazine conducted a similar survey in 2017 - See my quiz: "10 Best Cities of the World to Live In". They concentrated on housing, transportation, sustainability, and culture. Three cities on their top-10 list are missing from this one completely, namely Helsinki, Oslo, and Portland OR.. Well, there are about a zillion ways to conduct a survey like these:))
+1
level 64
Feb 13, 2018
I have been to lots of these cities and all of them are nice but I still don't understand why there are no Japanese cities on here. For me Tokyo will be the best city there is! Also I expected Seoul.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Tokyo and Seoul are both great cities. I've visited Tokyo 4 times and I lived in Seoul in 2007. Definitely very livable.
+1
level 59
Feb 13, 2018
Never been to Tokyo or Seoul but from photos I assume that the possibilities for local recreation are just lower than, e.g., in Munich. I mean, the accumulated key criteria for this list are wealth, culture, and recreation/health. Wealth and culture are at a great level for most westernised metropoles, thus recreation is the deal-breaker for the top of the list. And in this category, IMHO a 10mio+ city can just not compete with smaller, but nevertheless wealthy cities.
+1
level 73
Feb 13, 2018
You have absolutely no clue what you're talking about.
+1
level 59
Feb 14, 2018
Please be a bit more precise with your objection. Is it aiming on Tokyo/Seoul or the general conclusion? As said, I have never been in Tokyo/Seoul. I might be wrong on the possible level of recreation in those cities.
+1
level 73
Feb 15, 2018
Yes you're totally wrong about that and I'm puzzled as to why you would even think to draw a conclusion based on photos. What photos? Tokyo and Seoul are two of the most vibrant cities I've ever visited or lived in with plenty of things to see and do. What entertainment do you think Munich has that Tokyo lacks? Oktoberfest? People in Seoul go out drinking all night, every night, if that's what you fancy. If anything these cities have much more to offer in terms of entertainment venues and options than your average European city does.

The Mercer rankings have 39 factors grouped into 10 categories. The 7th category is "Recreation" and includes "restaurants, theaters, cinemas, sports and leisure, etc." As for restaurants, Tokyo restaurants have 304 Michelin stars, blowing away the closest European city (Paris, with 134). Munich has fewer than 20. Tokyo and Seoul both have great, world class cinemas. Most European cities have nothing that compares.
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level 73
Feb 15, 2018
Could go on at length but don't want to leave a dozen comments. Just... you're definitely wrong. Try visiting some time and see for yourself.
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level 59
Feb 15, 2018
First of all, I used "recreation" in a broader context, in particular with respect to "recreation in nature". You are right that Mercer does not list this a separate category but it is partially included in "4. Air pollution", "7. Sport and leisure", and proabably also in "7. (recreation) etc.". "Recreation in nature" highly correlates with the amount of trees you can find on a photo. Shinjuku Central Park in Tokyo or Hyde Park in London are nice for a short walk after your job but it is not recommended for week-end recreation like hiking tours, bike tours, relaxing at a lake (at least not for 5mio people simultaneously)...For many European cities on this list you can go to rural regions within less than one hour and often even without using a car. Again I highly expect that this is not possible in Tokyo.
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level 59
Feb 15, 2018
Second, who cares about the number of Michelin restaurants? Most people on Earth will never visit even one of those restaurants! And talking about entertainment venues, who cares if there are 2000 or only 200 nice bars in the city? Further, e.g. the theatre/opera density of central Europa is unmatched. Tokyo, NYC, etc. are probably comparable with (small) Vienna, but not beyond.
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level 35
Feb 16, 2018
Using Michelin stars in comparison of Tokyo and Paris doesn't really make any sense, Tokyo has what, 7 times the population of Paris? As for your other notes though, TheLastFish seems terribly misinformed. Seoul and Tokyo are world class cities in regards to recreation.
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level 59
Feb 16, 2018
I should not further judge this until I have visited those cities. Nevertheless, I wonder if we talk from completely different things. Just to make it clear again, I talk about stuff like the amount of trees within a distance of 10km from the city center.
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level 73
Feb 27, 2018
You know approximately about as much on this subject as the average fish so I'm not sure why I even bothered responding.
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level 55
Feb 13, 2018
You just knew their be some juicy, awful and funny comments here!
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level 43
Feb 13, 2018
Of course there would be so many cities in Germany, no wonder refugees go there.
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level 57
Feb 13, 2018
I'm from Vienna xDDD
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level 45
Feb 13, 2018
Interesting that the quiz states "There are no American cities on this list" yet there are 4 cities in North America on the list....
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level 73
Feb 13, 2018
North America is a continent, America is a country. The cities are Canadian.
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level 59
Feb 13, 2018
I wonder what will happen in future when the EU gets converted to the "United States of Europe". Propably everybody will then sloppily call its citizens "the Europeans", annoying the Swiss, the Russians, and maybe even the British and Northern Irish! :-D And some specialists will explain us: "West Eurasia is a continent, Europe is a country. Zurich is Swiss."
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level 73
Feb 13, 2018
Fish: they actually already do this. I get asked all the time at customs about how much time I've spent "in Europe"... by which they always mean the European Union... I'll start explaining that there are other parts of Europe not in the EU and not in the Schengen Area and their question is inherently stupid but I've learned it's better just to anticipate the fallacy.

Thing is the EU has been around less than 30 years. and referring to the EU as Europe creates confusion as there is a continent by the same name. The popular convention Ander refers to has been near universally understood since before any of us were born, annoying nobody until very recently. The only confusion in creates is feigned, as there is no continent called America. Calling the USA "America" should be as controversial as calling the United States of Mexico "Mexico"... but of course... it isn't. And we all know why though some of us pretend not to.
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level 59
Feb 14, 2018
I confirm that this sloppy nomenclature is commonly convenient also for non-US-Americans (as I do as well). (Although at least in German it is more limited to the US-citizens and associated adjective only. The country is typically called "USA" or "Vereinigte Staaten".) Nevertheless, the sloppy use of this term does not mean it is correct. America is first of all a supercontinent such as Eurasia. I see three ways how to think on why US-citizen (and others) persist calling their country "America". 1) They just don't care/think this is indeed unambigous. 2) There is a deep unconsious (or consious) attitude towards a pan-American imperialism (as backed by the past history and present power). 3) There is just no convenient "euphonic" alternative. E.g., "US-Americans" would semantically imply that the "people" of the USA is just a subfaction of the "pan-American people", "literally" constraining the sovereignty of the USA.
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level 73
Feb 15, 2018
America is not a continent to the large majority of people in the world. Your odd use of "America" to represent a supercontinent is not any more correct than the more common "North America" and "South America." Language is a tool to convey meaning. If a word is commonly used to mean something and commonly understood to mean that thing, then that word is an effective component of language. The ONLY reason that Americans, and the vast overwhelming majority of all humans on Earth, call America America is because that's what most people have been using that word to mean since the 19th century. It has zilch to do with imperialism. It's just convention. And there's absolutely nothing wrong with that convention. The problems people have with it are manufactured and date back to... about 6 years ago.
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level 59
Feb 15, 2018
The actual term "America" has been created in order to give the continent South America a name. Further, we learned in school that the vikings (re-)discovered "America" (Canada!) as well as that Colombus again re-discovered "America" (Bahamas!). THAT is the convention which all humans on Earth agree on since 500 years. The USA are virtually one of the last country in the Americas which has been considered to be a part of "America". Nevertheless, the majority of humans (including myself) may sloppily use this term not only for the continent but also for USA. But you will find hardly any person outside USA who denies that America is (also) a (super-)continent. At least nobody who visited history or geography lesson.
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level 73
Feb 27, 2018
I've never found one who didn't recognize that America was a country and not a continent and I've worked as an educator on four continents and had conversations on this subject with people in each. (or... 2... I guess... if you only count "super continents")
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level 16
Feb 14, 2018
Its a Russian conspiracy. Mercer and the Germans.
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level 59
Feb 14, 2018
A correspondent for the Irish Times offers some clever and snarky insight into Mercer's questionable metrics: "Closer examination confirms, of course, that Mercer has a particular purpose in mind. The chart has been compiled to 'help multinational companies and other employers fairly compensate employees when placing them on international assignments'. In other words, the survey is assessing cities in terms of how they suit people who drive Saabs and spend evenings in golf clubs. Such employers are required to hand over cash if the destination city is just a little bit too funky or a tad too much at home to cultural innovation. You don’t want hip-hop crews keeping you awake when you’re preparing for that conference call to Boggs & Baloney. The corporate avenger requires a quiet, bland environment that can be slipped into and slid out of as comfortably as he or she might annihilate a passing lame duck."
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level 44
Feb 14, 2018
Note for the quizmaster, have you ever considered using cologne?
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level 67
Feb 15, 2018
I don't smell anything?
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level 70
Feb 17, 2018
best comment on this quiz so far!
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level 36
Feb 15, 2018
Accept Cologne for Dusseldorf?
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level 67
Feb 15, 2018
It makes sense to lump the two together in agglomeration quizzes. However, they are still distinct cities. Cologne as well as the cities from the Ruhr Area would likely rank significantly lower than Düsseldorf in any list that measures livability.
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level 73
May 16, 2018
Interesting to see something as small as Luxembourg City on the list. It's not really much of a city, is it? Among cities that small, Salzburg seemed pretty livable to me.
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level 58
Jun 10, 2018
Gold Coast looks like a good place to live.
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