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Name that Nut, Seed, or Bean

Can you name the nuts, seeds, and beans pictured below?
According to culinary, not botanical definitions
Click an image to see a larger version and for attribution
Last updated: March 22, 2018
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+3
level 67
Mar 21, 2018
Please accept edamame for soybean. The photo you use is even the one used in the Wikipedia article for edamame. :-)
+3
level ∞
Mar 22, 2018
Okay
+1
level 68
Mar 22, 2018
Plus, edamame is delicious. And now I'm hungry.
+1
level 68
Jul 11, 2018
When I was in Japan many years ago, while still young and foolish, I took a train from one small town in Honshu to another. At each stop vendors sold bento boxes, so I bought one. But no one told me you were supposed to take the soybean out of its husk before eating it. . . .
+2
level 78
Mar 22, 2018
Well it asks for a bean. Edamame is a dish, not a bean. A bit like asking for a country and accepting the city. Also, the quiz would benefit from the yellow box. Just typing in any nuts you know you get halfway easily.
+1
level 73
Jul 11, 2018
You are correct, but my family raised soybeans for decades and as soon as I saw the photo I typed edamame because the pods were green rather than dried. My father would not be happy with me.
+1
level 58
Jul 14, 2018
A little research showed me that edamame is indeed a dish made with young soybean seeds. Unfortunately, I am afraid that the definition of that word is changing. Until now I never knew it was a type of dish, I thought it was what the young bean pod was called. Indeed, upon googling the word, I found many sources that seem to identify that word as meaning just that. I am not always happy about word meaning changing through (mis)usage, but have no control over what millions of people insist upon doing, however wrongly.
+4
level 66
Mar 22, 2018
Shame to leave out macadamia nut
+1
level 49
Jul 11, 2018
Harlan Pepper, if you don't stop naming nuts...
+1
level 63
Mar 22, 2018
Great! Now I want some peanuts... and almonds... and cashews... and...
+3
level 75
Mar 22, 2018
Never realized how much a chestnut looks like a buckeye.
+1
level 58
Jul 11, 2018
In the UK we have a tree, closely related to the buckeye, that we call "horse chestnut", because of the resemblance of the seeds to edible chestnuts. The seeds (or nuts) are called conkers and are used to play a game, also called conkers, where you try to smash your opponent's conker with yours.
+4
level 56
Mar 22, 2018
This quiz is nuts! 😉
+2
level 70
Mar 24, 2018
Needs a yellow box, me thinks.
+1
level 68
Jul 11, 2018
Yeah, I guessed two of the other answers while trying to guess #4
+3
level 72
Apr 1, 2018
Ugh. Tried runner bean, lima bean, and broad bean. Turns out I've never seen soybeans before.
+2
level 39
Jul 11, 2018
Yeah, I thought broad bean too.
+1
level 69
Jul 11, 2018
Out of curiosity, are acorns edible? They're the only one from this quiz I've never eaten in any form.
+1
level 65
Jul 11, 2018
Yes, but it takes a lot work to process usually. https://honest-food.net/how-to-eat-acorns/
+1
level 73
Jul 11, 2018
They can be turned into flour or roasted for a coffee substitute, but the tannins must first be leached out of them. We have several white oak trees and I tried the process once just to see what they were like. IMO they were bland and not worth the trouble of collecting, leaching, drying, shelling, and grinding - good to know for survival situations, but not for everyday table fare.
+1
level 72
Jul 11, 2018
In small amounts they are fine, but they have a high concentration of tannins in them so they are bitter and potentially toxic. To be eaten in large quantities they have to be be crushed and boiled or chemically treated multiple times to remove them. In other words it's not economically viable as a human food source. At least this is something I remember from a Bear Gryllis or Dual Survivor or something like that show.
+1
level 69
Jul 11, 2018
Sounds a bit like buckeyes, then, although I've never heard of anyone turning them into flour (and I now recall that I have heard of acorn flour, though I've never eaten it). Good to know!
+2
level 58
Jul 11, 2018
We eat them a lot in Korea/Korean cuisine. They are used to make a jelly which is then cut into noodles or blocks and seasoned to make a side dish. Parks in Korea often have signs telling us to not take the acorns because the squirrels need them. In diasporic communities many children are embarrassed by their parents who stop by side of the road or highway to collect acorns.
+1
level 73
Jul 11, 2018
ask a squirrel
+1
level 63
Jul 11, 2018
Lovely quiz! Great mix of things, all good pictures. Had no idea that Soybean looks like that! Perhaps because it's still in its green-stalk-thingy (excuse my use of complex terminology).
+1
level 73
Jul 11, 2018
Putting pumpkin seeds (or any nut still in its shell- looking at you pistachios) into a group of mixed nuts should be considered a crime against humanity.
+1
level 49
Jul 12, 2018
Kept typing in "buckeye" for chestnut. My born-and-raised-in-Ohio brain just couldn't fathom that there could be any other answer. LOL
+1
level 30
Jul 12, 2018
got them all!!
+1
level 63
Jul 14, 2018
Thanks for accepting filberts for hazelnuts! Great nutty quiz!
+1
level 2
Jul 17, 2018
cool