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Vegetables by Picture

Can you identify the vegetables pictured below?
Click an image to see a larger version and for attribution
Last updated: March 20, 2018
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+24
level 70
Mar 20, 2018
A couple of these as vegetables may fall into the Cyprus is European category
+5
level 70
Mar 21, 2018
I was wondering when a tomato argument might start.
+2
level 71
Jun 8, 2018
OK, I'll start it off for a bit of fun. Tomato is technically a fruit. There, how's that?
+3
level 65
Mar 20, 2018
How come fennel is so low? Not well known in the US?
+8
level 74
Mar 20, 2018
We prefer less licorice-flavored vegetables.
+2
level 74
Jun 8, 2018
I can't stand licorice but I love fennel bulbs, especially when they're cooked - roasting or braising are great. Mixed with other foods the licorice flavor isn't prominent and serves to enhance other flavors, and the sweetness is brought out with cooking. Bulb fennel is difficult to grow, however, at least in my area. I've done it successfully but it requires extra TLC and a good rabbit fence - the little beggars bypass the lettuce and carrots and go right to eating fennel plants to the ground. Herb or bulb fennel is a great host plant for swallowtail butterfly caterpillars and I am always happy to share dill or fennel with them.
+2
level 75
Mar 21, 2018
Because it's gross? :-)
+1
level 45
Jun 8, 2018
Is it slimy?
+5
level 69
Mar 25, 2018
Oh come on, fennel-haters! Try it on a salad. It's very delicious.
+4
level 66
Mar 20, 2018
Could you accept sweetcorn and sprout (without the Brussels)?
+4
level 74
Mar 20, 2018
In the eastern US, "spouts" (without Brussels) would refer to alfalfa or bean sprouts - which are used in salads, sandwiches, etc.
+5
level 71
Mar 20, 2018
That's as maybe, but in the UK at least, they're probably better known as sprouts than Brussels sprouts
+1
level 69
Mar 25, 2018
Actually the "sprouts" thing is pretty much North America-wide and not just Eastern US, as far as I can tell.
+1
level 45
Jun 8, 2018
East Coast snobs think we stupid AZ cowboys think the only real vegetable is the potato.
+1
level 75
Mar 20, 2018
Or accept "Brussel Sprout"?
+1
level 64
Mar 20, 2018
Agree. I tried Brussel Sprouts because that's what people call them commonly where I live.
+1
level ∞
Mar 20, 2018
Brussel sprout will work now.
+5
level 69
Mar 25, 2018
Oh come on, I think we should be expected to know how to spell BRUSSELS for crying out loud. DON'T GIVE IN, QUIZMASTER!!! ;-)
+1
level 42
Jun 11, 2018
Yeah, nobody calls them "brussels sprouts". Once I'd gotten aubergine, I figured all vegetables would have the most common UK terms accepted
+4
level 70
Mar 21, 2018
See, in Australia both the pumpkin and the butternut squash would just be called a pumpkin.
+2
level 69
Mar 25, 2018
Really? Do you guys not do pumpkin-carving for Halloween?
+1
level 59
Jun 8, 2018
No, pumpkin carving is not a thing in NZ or Australia.
+1
level 18
Jun 8, 2018
But we do eat pumpkin year-round, primarily as a savoury dish. Roast pumpkin is an essential of any roast dinner!
+1
level 53
Jun 8, 2018
And we like to stuff 'em.
+1
level 74
Jun 8, 2018
Giant pumpkin regattas are becoming a thing in the US. People carve giant pumpkins into boats and race them.
+1
level 47
Jun 25, 2018
Although you would be unlikely to find that particular breed of pumpkin...generally you have butternut pumpkins and Japanese Pumpkins most commonly available (although there are a number of others)
+2
level 63
Mar 22, 2018
I'm a bit surprised that parsnip is so well known. Is it used often in the US?
+3
level 69
Mar 25, 2018
Well, considering it falls in percentage guessed just below okra, which is pretty much a southern food here, I wouldn't say parsnips are *all* that well-known, but they are certainly widely available. And I think most people have at least heard of them, even if they couldn't quickly identify one on sight. They're definitely called for in any high-end root vegetable dish. (Hope that answers your question!)
+1
level 63
Jun 8, 2018
It does. Thank you! I can't remember seeing parsnip at all where I live (Germany), that's why I was surprised that about 60% of the quiz takers knew it.
+1
level 74
Jun 8, 2018
That's interesting because the only reason I know about them is my German mother in law who lives in the states. I've always assumed it was a common German food item, like rutabaga. I'll have to pay more attention at the grocery store when we go back this summer.
+1
level 53
Jun 8, 2018
Parsnip is fantastic. Try pureed with ginger and cream.......
+4
level 74
Jun 8, 2018
Roasted with carrots and onions.
+1
level 17
Jun 8, 2018
I'm surprised. In Poland parsnip is one of main ingredients of any soup. I mean for building taste, but still.
+1
level 63
Apr 9, 2018
Missed cauliflower! And I eat cauliflower! Good quiz though!
+1
level 32
Jun 1, 2018
pumpkins and tomatoes are fruits
+1
level 48
Jun 8, 2018
So are capsicums and chillies. What's your point?
+1
level 67
Jun 8, 2018
Capsicums and chillies are not in this quiz about vegetables.
+1
level 65
Jun 9, 2018
Capsicum is another name for bell peppers, so it is in fact in the quiz. Also fruits: eggplant, butternut squash, and cucumber.
+1
level 61
Jun 8, 2018
And cucumbers!
+2
level 59
Jun 8, 2018
And the nit picker of the year award goes to...
+1
level 41
Jun 8, 2018
Damn you Okra!
+3
level 33
Jun 8, 2018
Please accept ladyfinger for okra.
+3
level 74
Jun 8, 2018
I know okra is called ladyfinger in some places, but if you saw my Fife Creek cowhorn okra you wouldn't think there was anything ladylike about it. :) 10-12" pods that are still tender, grown on mammoth, branching 8-foot plants - they are like trees growing in the garden. I never met an okra I didn't like, and if you know how to cook it, it isn't slimy. I usually grow four varieties each summer - Alabama Red, Burmese, and Emerald are my favorites.
+2
level 49
Jun 10, 2018
Doesn't matter how un-ladylike it is, most of the world knows it as ladyfinger.
+1
level 52
Sep 29, 2018
ladyfingers are a variety of banana. small and with a lemony tang
+1
level 53
Jun 8, 2018
Tomato is a fruit
+1
level 35
Jun 8, 2018
Tomato is a fruit. Fact
+1
level 49
Jun 8, 2018
Awful lotta fruits on this vegetables quiz...
+2
level 41
Jun 8, 2018
Because it's the culinary definition of a vegetable and not the scientific(?) one.
+1
level 75
Jun 8, 2018
The quiz doesn't state it is using the culinary definition. Blackholexsun and others above are correct.
+1
level 42
Jun 11, 2018
The quiz also doesn't state that it's based on scientific vegetables either, so you need to use your common sense to figure out that the majority of people go by culinary vegetables and that, as you are oh so smart enough to know that many of them aren't scientific vegetables, it must be a quiz about culinary vegetables. People trying to look smart by pointing out well known non-vegetables in this quiz only make themselves look the opposite
+1
level 47
Oct 27, 2018
A vegetable can be a fruit, fruit has an exact scientific definition, vegetable does not.
+1
level 21
Nov 18, 2018
Most of them in fact, are fruit ... capsicum, cucmber, okra, tomato, aubergine, pumpkin and squash - anything you eat the whole fruit is a fruit - but culinary speaking ... fruit can be either savoury or sweet, in fact Masterchef Australia taught us how to use tomatoes as a dessert. Vegetables can also be used as a sweet like the rhubarb, but is usually just the roots, leaves or stalk of the plant is eaten in order for it to be classed as a vegetable. So good quiz - doesn't matter whether it's a fruit/vegetable really, as long as we know what they are and use them instead of food that is posing as food.
+1
level 34
Jun 8, 2018
Only missed okra. Never heard of them before. Where are they eaten?
+1
level 52
Sep 29, 2018
in the middle east a lot, too...
+1
level 52
Jun 8, 2018
Traditionally in the south. It's from Africa. Can be in stew or breaded with corn meal and fried.
+2
level 37
Jun 8, 2018
When I had a flat tire, i said "I should have brought asparagus."
+3
level 65
Jun 9, 2018
Good lord, do people get het up about the fact that "fruit" and "vegetable" are not actually mutually exclusive. Tomatoes (and corn, and eggplants, and pumpkins, and cucumbers, and bell peppers, and okra, and butternut squash, and...) are botanically fruits, but are culinarily vegetables. This quiz is obviously going by the culinary definition of "vegetable," which is rather arbitrary but generally means "a plant part that humans use as a savory food," while culinarily "fruit" generally means "a plant part that humans use as a sweet food."

How do you define "vegetable" so that it excludes tomatoes? "A plant part used as food that is not botanically a fruit?" Then you're going to lose string beans, eggplant, corn, snap peas, and a lot more as vegetables as well.
+1
level 51
Jun 9, 2018
Perhaps you should substitute a bottle of ketchup for the tomato.
+1
level 58
Jul 31, 2018
I didn't know Ketchup was a vegetable.
+1
level 45
Jun 10, 2018
Isn't a Pumpkin a fruit?
+1
level 42
Jun 11, 2018
In botanical terms yes, in culinary terms no
+1
level 71
Jun 12, 2018
I thought "Damn, what's that gumbo vegetable called, again?", then typed "gumbo" just for the heck of it and was given "okra". Thanks, QM!
+1
level 23
Jun 13, 2018
Only just got artichoke because someone helped me. Thanks wogs!
+1
level 48
Jun 21, 2018
I am reasonably sure that at least 7 of these are technically fruits.
+1
level 65
Jun 29, 2018
Botanically, yes. Culinarily, no.
+1
level 66
Jul 5, 2018
Like this quiz?........ try my Fruit / Veg / Nut Picture quiz ..here it is
+1
level 27
Aug 22, 2018
can tell the creator of this quiz is American ... i type in aubergine and it changes it to eggplant.
+1
level 21
Aug 29, 2018
The artichokes look kinda purple. Guess they've been "chokin'" a lot XD
+1
level 65
Oct 14, 2018
Please allow red beet.