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Obfuscations of Popular Cliches

Translate these long-winded phrases into the popular cliches that have the same meaning.
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter answer here".

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Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Obfuscation
Saying
Precipitation composed of canine and feline organisms
Place your monetary possessions in the same locality as your oral cavity
Pulchritude is dependent on the ocular organ of that who appraises it
Discharging firearms upon ichthyoid creatures in a cylindrical container
Simian's parent's male sibling
Amorous emotions are incapable of perceiving electromagnetic radiation
in the visible spectrum
Lucre causes the rotation of the celestial body upon which we reside
Transport cured porcine abdomen to one's domicile
The portion of an ocean-bound unit of solid dihydrogen monoxide that is not submerged
A tertiary attempt will yield a propitious outcome
Don't allow even a solitary small mineral aggregate to remain in a non-inverted position
Buffet an equid whose biological functions have permanently ceased
The set of all possible outcomes does not include a midday repast
devoid of monetary remuneration
Desiccated as a piece of mineralized osseous tissue
Answer Stats
Obfuscation
Saying
% Correct
Your %
+2
level 68
Mar 11, 2013
The proper phrase is "Third time's the charm."
+1
level 77
Apr 10, 2013
I concur.
+2
level ∞
Apr 10, 2013
"A charm" is definitely the most common version. Since there's no official standards body for this, I can't imagine there is a proper version. Nevertheless, the quiz will now accept "the charm" as well.
+1
level 51
Sep 23, 2015
I agree with quizmaster on this one.
+1
level 73
Sep 24, 2015
I always heard it as simply, "Third time's charm."
+2
level 61
Oct 6, 2017
I disagree with Quizmaster--I NEVER heard "a charm".
+1
level 57
Oct 6, 2017
I agree with Quizmaster - i have ONLY heard "a charm". I can use all caps too.
+1
level 58
Oct 6, 2017
I have always heard "third try's the charm." At least make this an option.
+1
level 23
May 18, 2018
I respect the quizmaster
+2
level 57
Apr 10, 2013
Can you accept "third time lucky" for this as well please?
+1
level 35
Apr 10, 2013
I concur.
+1
level 13
Apr 10, 2013
I've never heard 'Third time's a charm'. I would use Third time lucky
+1
level 10
Apr 10, 2013
Seconding this. I've heard "Third time lucky" thousands of times, but have never in my life come across "third time's a charm". Americanism, I guess. Fantastic idea for a quiz though!
+1
level 50
Apr 11, 2013
Thirded (see my comment below).
+1
level ∞
Apr 12, 2013
Okay, that will work now.
+1
level 57
May 21, 2013
I disagree.
+1
level 35
Nov 6, 2013
I've never heard "the charm" except on American TV. From what I've gathered, the charm version is American.
+1
level 68
Jan 4, 2014
I've always heard "third try's the charm". And "try" seems to fit better with your substitution of "attempt" than "time" would.
+1
level 68
Apr 1, 2014
My thoughts exactly.
+1
level 57
Oct 7, 2017
Agreed. I've never once heard "a charm."
+1
level 66
Aug 19, 2015
I guess I was too proper and specific. I tried "third time is the charm." Don't know why I didnt type it in exactly as I say it. :P
+1
level 60
Oct 7, 2017
I've only ever heard it as "three time's a charm".
+1
level 69
Jul 5, 2018
Number of Google search results for "third time's a charm" (in quotes): 437,000

Number of Google search results for "third time's the charm" (in quotes): 478,000
+1
level 45
Apr 10, 2013
why are people so picky? it's just a quiz... and a very fun one too!
+1
level 75
Sep 30, 2014
Because they like to get a good score! And because we are all naturally provincial and therefore think that the way we understand things is the way that the rest of the world does (or should).
+2
level 65
Sep 23, 2015
Translation: people are d***s.
+1
level 48
Jun 22, 2018
Exactly. Thanks for cutting through the obfuscation.
+2
level 73
Sep 24, 2015
I don't think it's being picky. I think it's just people sharing their own understanding of something. I enjoy seeing the different versions from different areas and hope people continue to share them.
+1
level 43
Apr 10, 2013
Fun! More of these please!
+1
level 66
Apr 10, 2013
Good quiz!
+1
level 56
Apr 10, 2013
Got all of them except "tip of the iceberg." Finally, after 14 years, I have found a use for studying Latin in high school!
+1
level 49
Apr 10, 2013
Could you accept just the words "no free lunch?"
+1
level 35
Nov 6, 2013
Well that's just lazy
+1
level 66
Jun 8, 2015
I tried that, too. Could not think of the rest of it to save my life!
+1
level 73
Sep 24, 2015
I sometimes hear it as, "There's no free lunch." People misquote or modernize cliches all the time to the point that sometimes it's difficult to know what the original phrase might have been. I don't see that as being lazy.
+1
level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
No free lunch will work now
+3
level 66
Oct 6, 2017
What about TANSTAAFL...
+1
level 64
Apr 10, 2013
Love this! I kept trying "Love makes the world go round." Guess I'm not cynical enough LOL
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
I kept trying _____ makes the world spin around .. sigh
+1
level 44
Jun 6, 2018
YoU sPiN mE rIgHt RoUnD lIkE a ReCoRd BaBy
+1
level 30
Apr 10, 2013
You need to make some of these more accommodating. I tried "money makes the world turn round", "money makes the Earth turn round", "money makes the Earth spin round" etcetera for ages before I final got the exact phrase.
+1
level 60
Sep 23, 2015
I guess you've never heard the world famous song "Money makes the World go Around" from "Cabaret"
+1
level 73
Sep 24, 2015
I think the original phrase was "love makes the world go 'round" from a song in the 1890s, but someone added a bit of irony to the original and changed it to "money", possibly first in the song from the musical, Cabaret.
+1
level 32
Nov 13, 2015
I agree, that's an issue with a lot of these phrasings. Maybe it is because I'm not a native speaker, but I knew most of them and always got a tiny detail wrong. (E.g. I tried "third time's the charm", "shooting at a barrel of fish", "Beauty lies within the eye of the beholder", "Leave no pebble unturned" and none were accepted).
+1
level 68
May 12, 2016
Well then, think of this as a way of perfecting your English language and American idioms!
+1
level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
True, "shooting at a barrel of fish" is simply not the proper idiom. Although it would no doubt be amusing to your native English-speaking friends!
+1
level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
Added some more type-ins for "money makes the world go round"
+1
level 49
Mar 23, 2018
you didnt add the one I tried like 67 times til I ran out of time. Money makes the earth spin around :P
+1
level 79
Apr 10, 2013
Gah, got caught on third try instead of third time.
+1
level 16
Apr 10, 2013
Got all 14. Possibly my favorite quiz ever on this site. Or at least the most original.
+1
level 49
Apr 10, 2013
Very fun. Finished with 3:45 remaining.
+1
level 62
Apr 10, 2013
So difficult! I tried every version of "don't leave any rock unturned" that I could think of, but didn't manage to get it right.
+6
level 11
Apr 11, 2013
The police were burning a large stash of marijuana they had confiscated and a flock of terns flew through the smoke....leaving no tern unstoned.
+1
level 73
Dec 4, 2013
*Facepalm*
+2
level 60
Sep 23, 2015
*Groan*
+1
level 46
Sep 23, 2015
You're awesome.
+1
level 68
Oct 6, 2017
And, according to Tom Wolfe in "The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test," Ken Kesey had a sign "No Left Turn Unstoned" outside his house.
+1
level 44
Apr 10, 2013
I kept trying to put "in the eye of the beholder." I think that should be an acceptable answer. :/
+1
level 18
Apr 17, 2013
I would agree. Many things other than beauty are referred to as being in the eye of the beholder. However, in the case of this quiz, part of the phrase (pulchritude) refers directly to beauty.
+1
level 35
Nov 6, 2013
No it shouldn't. This quiz is supposed to catch you out with the vague words you've never heard of. If it was accepted without beauty you miss out on the fun of the quiz.
+1
level 28
Apr 10, 2013
Great quiz. Answers will be different for your locale, but great anyway!
+1
level 37
Apr 10, 2013
Different! I like it.
+1
level 50
Apr 11, 2013
I love this quiz. Just one comment. In Britain we say 'Third time lucky', so perhaps you could allow this as an answer. I've never heard 'Third time's a charm'.
+1
level 44
Apr 12, 2013
Tried "don't leave a stone unturned" - Is that close enough?
+1
level 20
Apr 12, 2013
Epicly hard quiz o.o! Interesting though at the same time.
+1
level 20
Apr 16, 2013
Equally confused on these... I got 1/14.
+1
level 73
Sep 23, 2015
It's so easy... just think about what the words mean.
+1
level 25
Apr 24, 2013
beauty is in the eyes of the beholder should be accepted. not just eye
+1
level 13
Apr 24, 2013
Best quiz I've taken yet. Make more!
+1
level 8
Dec 19, 2013
I typed "there's no such thing as free lunch" without the "a" and it wasn't accepted.
+1
level 25
Feb 20, 2014
can you accept "third time is the charm"
+1
level 27
Apr 28, 2014
Best quiz ever!
+1
level 75
Sep 30, 2014
This might be my favorite quiz on here. The Jospeh Ducreux meme is fantastic.
+1
level 53
Dec 14, 2014
New favorite quiz! More more more!
+1
level 27
Sep 23, 2015
Ha ha this one got me good...
+1
level 73
Sep 23, 2015
Elementary.
+1
level 46
Sep 23, 2015
Nice quiz. Fun and makes you think. Got most of them too!
+1
level 53
Sep 23, 2015
That one was a crack up.
+1
level 59
Sep 23, 2015
Where's #2, please?
+1
level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
http://www.jetpunk.com/quizzes/obfuscations-of-popular-cliches-2
+1
level 49
Sep 23, 2015
Can you accept beat the dead horse?
+1
level 60
Sep 23, 2015
I enjoyed that more than any quiz I've taken in quite a while.
+1
level 46
Sep 23, 2015
Thanks so much for this quiz, it's so fun!!! I got them all with 2:09 to spare! These made me laugh quite a bit.
+1
level 55
Sep 24, 2015
bloody hell bit more challenging than most here, good to see. thanks for the thought that went into it
+1
level 61
Sep 24, 2015
This was brilliant - actually made me think, unlike so many others. Off to try quiz #2, but can't wait for more like this.
+1
level 49
Sep 24, 2015
"Third time is a charm" Please don't mandate contractions.
+1
level 19
Feb 28, 2016
The answers are way too fussy
+1
level ∞
Apr 5, 2017
Be specific please
+1
level 29
Mar 11, 2016
Dihydrogen monoxide.....I remember that one always set me chuckling.
+1
level 56
Jun 8, 2016
Could you accept "don't leave a stone unturned"?
+1
level 60
Aug 29, 2017
Agree, the exact version I am familiar with is: "don't leave any stone unturned", but this also was not accepted. Please accept more versions of this saying as acceptable variations exist.
+1
level 74
Aug 7, 2016
Hmm...never heard of a monkey's uncle.
+1
level 65
Oct 6, 2017
Well I'll be a monkey's uncle!
+1
level 58
Mar 7, 2017
I was happily amazed when it accepted "Third time lucky", but then I was sadly amazed when it didn't accept "Kick a dead horse"
+1
level 65
Oct 6, 2017
I agree, I tried at least four versions of hitting, kicking, whipping the poor old horse, but didn't get it.
+1
level 66
Oct 6, 2017
6 minutes seems awfully long for 14 questions
+1
level 45
Oct 6, 2017
How about: Clue. Never let any sea bird remain sober. Answer: Don't leave any tern un-stoned.
+1
level 39
Oct 6, 2017
Allow 'Beauty is int he EYES of the beholder' (plural)?
+1
level 62
Oct 6, 2017
Another cliche is "blind as a bat"
+1
level 35
Oct 6, 2017
I was very literal with my first answer ,I put raining dogs and cats.Was not accepted as an answer.
+1
level 56
Oct 6, 2017
This was an excellent quiz. The only one I had trouble with the phrasing was 'Bring home the bacon' as I first tried 'Take home the bacon'. Thanks!
+1
level 55
Oct 7, 2017
Surely bring the bacon home should be permissable?
+1
level 60
Oct 7, 2017
That's what I tried too. I think a little more leniency should be expected with the exact phrasing. For instance, it took me quite a while to get the first one: "It rains cats and dogs" - not accepted (although that's what most people would say in the context). "Rains cats and dogs" - not accepted. Just "cats and dogs" perhaps? Who are you kidding? No it absolutely has to be "rainING..." - even if nothing in the clue hinted at that. And like klo7 said, the literal translation would be "rain of dogs and cats"; so the order in the clue is wrong too, as you'd never say "dogs and cats".
+1
level ∞
Oct 8, 2017
Your assumption that we require exact phrasing is incorrect. We accept many different phrases for each question. We will accept "rains cats and dogs" now too.
+1
level 59
Oct 12, 2017
Can you accept these: tip of an iceberg, third try is the charm, don't leave a stone unturned..?
+1
level 35
Oct 15, 2017
haha for some reason my brain insisted it was 'shooting rats in a barrel'
+1
level 64
Dec 7, 2017
This was a fun one!
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