Most Popular Baby Girl Names in the U.S.

Guess the most popular names for baby girls born in the United States for each of the last five years.
We give the first letter of the name as a clue
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 17, 2020
First submittedMay 25, 2012
Times taken98,616
Rating3.61
4:00
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0
 / 19 guessed
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2019
O
Olivia
E
Emma
A
Ava
S
Sophia
I
Isabella
C
Charlotte
A
Amelia
M
Mia
H
Harper
E
Evelyn
A
Abigail
E
Emily
E
Ella
E
Elizabeth
C
Camila
2018
E
Emma
O
Olivia
A
Ava
I
Isabella
S
Sophia
C
Charlotte
M
Mia
A
Amelia
H
Harper
E
Evelyn
A
Abigail
E
Emily
E
Elizabeth
M
Mila
E
Ella
2017
E
Emma
O
Olivia
A
Ava
I
Isabella
S
Sophia
M
Mia
C
Charlotte
A
Amelia
E
Evelyn
A
Abigail
H
Harper
E
Emily
E
Elizabeth
A
Avery
S
Sofia
2016
E
Emma
O
Olivia
A
Ava
S
Sophia
I
Isabella
M
Mia
C
Charlotte
A
Abigail
E
Emily
H
Harper
A
Amelia
E
Evelyn
E
Elizabeth
S
Sofia
M
Madison
2015
E
Emma
O
Olivia
S
Sophia
A
Ava
I
Isabella
M
Mia
A
Abigail
E
Emily
C
Charlotte
H
Harper
M
Madison
A
Amelia
E
Elizabeth
S
Sofia
E
Evelyn
+4
Level 80
Feb 13, 2013
It's so silly how names in the US come and go like fashion. When I was a kid there were so many Michelles and Jennifers and now they don't even make the list at all. My sister has two girls. Abigail and Hayley (not Hailey.. maybe you could include that as an alt spelling?)... both unsurprisingly on this list. And a boy Jacob, which is I think the most trendy boys' name right now. People are such sheep...
+5
Level 55
May 18, 2014
My kids are Elizabeth and Nathan. Unremarkable classics commonly spelled. But my husband wouldn't go for Chrysanthemum or Guildford.
+3
Level 80
May 10, 2016
1st gf narrowly avoided being named Ruby Begonia. She ended up as a Jennifer. Like half the female population of the United States born that year...
+1
Level 44
May 16, 2017
Elizabeth is my middle name!
+2
Level 78
May 26, 2014
I'm from the era of Vicky, Carol, and Debbie. You don't see those names anymore, either. Today they seem to prefer the longer versions, Victoria and Carolyn, and I suppose Deborah is completely off the charts. I have a friend whose granddaughters are named Melody and Symphony.
+1
Level 80
May 11, 2015
I "knew" a Deborah in Cebu who was only 19. I think she's 20 now.
+1
Level 78
May 11, 2015
Deborah is from the Bible so I suppose it will always be a possibility as some people prefer to use biblical names, but it may be a while before Vicky and Carol come 'round again. I've noticed that the pronunciation has changed for Deborah, though. In my day the accent was on the first syllable which led to the nickname of Debbie or Deb. Nowadays when I do hear the name it has the accent on the second syllable. How was your friend's name pronounced, Kalb?
+1
Level 80
May 11, 2015
I called her Debbie.
+4
Level 58
May 11, 2016
The quotation marks around "knew" are a little suspicious, kalbahamut...
+8
Level 54
May 11, 2016
being a biblical name, I assume it's "knew" in the biblical sense.
+2
Level 44
May 16, 2017
Symphony?! Wow!
+1
Level 80
Sep 13, 2018
Knew another girl, in the same sense, in Los Angeles who was named Poetry.
+13
Level 78
May 20, 2013
I don't understand why we're so judgmental when it comes to how others name their children. Just seems like an odd thing to have such a strong opinion about.
+5
Level 50
Jun 14, 2014
Uh-huh. SERIOUSLY PEOPLE, GET A LIFE!!!
+3
Level 67
Jun 14, 2019
strong likes or dislikes for a name, sure. But bashing or judging the parents for it, or projecting all sorts of prejudice on it... no.

There are SOME names that simple go beyond common sense. Other than that it is simply taste (and yes the amount of times you have heard a name plays a role in that) That name that one person finds horrendous the other finds charming. So one might say parents that name their kid Abigail are horrible people while others think how on earth could you name your kid Carla, they must be ... "insert a random group of people/character trait etc" (Rich, dumb, hippies etc).

I do agree that it is surprising how a name can be so in fashion, if you know like 10 aidens personally... why name your kid that aswell? Classes with a quarter of the kid the same name... Well I guess to counter that, there is the "unique"spellings.

+2
Level 79
May 26, 2014
I don't have a problem with unusual names so much as ordinary names with unusual or alternate spellings. I really wish every name had just one universal spelling and that's it. Do you know how many times in my life I have been asked "Is that Eric with a 'c' or a 'k'?" I'm so sick of that. And it's only got to be worse for all the Gynnifers and Katelins of the world.
+1
Level 67
Jun 14, 2019
I dont mind alternate spellings persee. As long as they make sense and are not purely to be fancy. Like nancy spelled as nhancihi or something with way too much letters. Stephen or Steven, no problem. Zhstiefhan... yes...
+3
Level 48
Oct 25, 2020
I worked with a woman that went out of her way to give her children unique names, I told her spelling a normal name in a ridiculous manner doesn't constitute a unique name. Her boys' name was spelled Zeaqquett but was pronounced Steven. Her girls' name was spelled Zeaqquette but was pronounced Sarah.
+1
Level 61
May 26, 2014
wow some of these names are crazy....
+1
Level 48
May 27, 2014
Got five!
+3
Level 50
Jun 14, 2014
And for all the people complaining about these names-- At least they weren't named Lobelia(Sackville-Baggins)!
+1
Level 65
May 11, 2015
Can I ask that you accept "Abby" for Abigail? The other girls' names quiz accepts it, so I just assumed it wasn't on the list when it didn't take it.
+1
Level ∞
May 11, 2015
Okay
+1
Level 82
May 13, 2015
I did guess "Elisabeth" !
+1
Level 21
Dec 21, 2015
100% people are so predictable these days Pretty names though
+10
Level 83
Jun 17, 2016
On the contrary, people are far less predictable today than past years, at least when it comes to naming their children. In 1950, only 5% of parents strayed out of the Top 1,000 names when naming their child. In 2012, 27% of parents went weird and left the Top 1,000. The top 10 names used to command a huge percentage of all births, but it is much lower today as people go for "unique". If it hasn't been posted yet, the Baby Voyager site is really interesting. http://www.babynamewizard.com/voyager#prefix=&sw=both&exact=false
+4
Level 74
May 10, 2016
Nice lack of gender stereotyping in the photo... if the baby really is a girl, good on the parents on dressing her up in blue!
+1
Level 63
May 16, 2016
It looks mostly white with patterns.
+1
Level 79
Jun 23, 2016
A handful I never would have gotten, since I think of them as male names - either usually, or at least interchangeably. Examples of 'male' names on the list include Aubrey (maybe folks are confusing it with Audrey?), Avery, and of course Addison and Madison (which mean 'son of Adam' and 'son of Matthew' respectively).
+3
Level 72
Sep 11, 2016
Aubrey is definitely a male name. If you're giving it to a girl, you're basically just misspelling Audrey. Frankly, I'm not sure why anyone would do that - Audrey is a much more euphonious name.
+2
Level 82
Sep 21, 2020
I've never known any males named Aubrey, but my sister had a female Toy Pomeranian named Aubrey, so I've always thought of it as a female name.
+1
Level 55
Oct 25, 2020
Agree with vermicious. Have never met a male Aubrey, but have personally known more than one female Aubrey.
+1
Level 78
Oct 25, 2020
I met a man named Aubrey but his family called him Aubbie.
+1
Level 67
Jun 14, 2019
I am not really familiar with either.. but if you would have asked me which of this is the boys name and which is the girls name, I would ve said, audrey is the male name and aubrey the girl. Audrey looks like andrew amongst other things, aubrey... I dont know, maybe it is the bri (brie not bry) like in brianna.
+1
Level 74
Sep 20, 2020
Audrey used to be pretty big in France for people of my age. Not only one girl with that name, I've come across. It's making a new coming in other countries (yes, I checked). Apparently it originates from Æðelþryð which was a name for a strong and noble princess. Always been female.

Aubrey, to me, sounds like someone is pleasantly surprised at finding a chunk of cheese. It turns out to be unisex nowadays and originally it's Alberich or Alberic, which is a man's name from German mythology. One very mighty king of the dwarfs.
+1
Level 49
Sep 22, 2016
I think names are a funny thing. Especially how Tv/social media influences our life. I was born in the 70s One tine a lady told me in a hospital what year i was born by the spelling of my name because there was a popular tv character that year or two that spelled it that way. She told me, everyone she had ever seen with that name and that spelling was around the same age due to the tv show. This included the women's own daughter. I think we hear a name on tv or see it in a magazine and think how great the name is, not realizing millions of other people are thinking the same thing. I have an Emily, never realizing it would be so popular. Had no clue. However if i would have had her 10 12 years before I probably would have name her Alexis or Paradise, so Im grateful for my maturity.
+1
Level 6
Dec 16, 2017
Ah, the good olden days of Isabelle...just kidding
+1
Level 10
Dec 20, 2017
Me (10) and my brother (7) got 20/20 in 1:50 😀
+2
Level 68
Apr 11, 2018
That's great! Probably easier for you kids since all your classmates have these sorts of names. Us old folks kept typing in names that aren't popular any more. :-)
+1
Level 23
Jun 1, 2018
I just have one question. Why are the names Emma and Olivia popular? I mean, don't get me wrong, I love common names like Mary and Ava. It's just that Emma and Olivia are TOO common for me. I don't know why I don't like those names, I just feel like they are not the best names.
+2
Level 44
Jun 12, 2018
Sometimes people name their kids after older relatives like grandmothers and great-grandmothers and the name gets recycled, so to speak.
+1
Level 48
Aug 6, 2018
Very surprised to see Elizabeth on all 5 lists. Never known anyone born later than the 70s to have that name.
+2
Level 65
Sep 10, 2018
I know a 3-year-old Elizabeth.
+1
Level 78
Sep 10, 2018
It's the middle name of my 6-yr-old granddaughter, and is also her mother's middle name which I think may have come from her mother or grandmother, and on it goes. It's a biblical name.
+2
Level 68
Sep 10, 2018
There were three Elizabeths in one of my seminar groups at uni about five years ago, but they all went by shortened versions (Ellie, Lizzy, and Beth).
+3
Level 78
Sep 10, 2018
The only time names really bug me is when parents intentionally make them noteworthy because of the surname. I grew up hearing about Texas Gov. Hogg's daughter, Ima. My grandfather knew a girl named Belle Ringer. There was an attorney in the old courthouse books of our area named Madden Looney. All of those would be fine first names, but to pair them with their surnames seems cruel to me.
+1
Level 80
Sep 10, 2018
There was a gynecologist at the hospital where I worked named Harry Beaver. If you google it now he's become so notorious that he's even got a snopes page about him.
+1
Level 78
Oct 25, 2020
When I was a girl there were two urologists who formed a practice together named Drs. Ruff and Reddy but I think your doctor's name is better.
+1
Level 83
Sep 10, 2018
Interesting how the names of both of my sisters (Emily and Ava) are still relatively popular. Especially Ava. I only knew like two Avas growing up and now they seem to be everywhere.
+1
Level 57
Sep 25, 2018
Got a bunch, then resorted to typing "Hortense" and "Harriet" and "Mavis" because fashions are so random you never know. On a wild whim, I even tried "Margaret." If I had a girl, I swear I'd name her Jane. (Warning: our granddaughters will all be called Shirley and Lois.)
+1
Level 78
Oct 25, 2020
Shirley and Lois are both being used in my area now, along with Geneva.
+1
Level 47
Mar 23, 2019
If you accept Sophie for Sophia then you should accept Isabelle for Isabella
+1
Level ∞
May 12, 2019
Ok
+2
Level 77
Sep 20, 2020
And Isabel?
+1
Level 63
Sep 22, 2020
I dodged a bullet with my oldest. If he'd been a girl he would most likely have been a Harper - this being just months before Victoria Beckham called her daughter that. I would have had to explain to everyone that no, my kid is NOT named after the Beckham's child. The name has increased hugely in popularity although it seems more popular in the US than over here in the UK though.
+3
Level 78
Sep 24, 2020
Does this mean the Zoe/Chloe phase is over? I think every other girl in my son's class was named that.
+1
Level 80
Oct 25, 2020
Not having any small children in school in this US I think makes this quiz extremely difficult.
+1
Level 78
Oct 25, 2020
I heard a young girl once say she wanted to have five daughters when she grew up and name them Zoe, Chloe, Ione, Leone, and Phoebe. I asked how she spelled "Foby" and she spelled it the same as Phoebe "Feeby".
+1
Level 20
Oct 8, 2020
Easy for me, being 11. Running through friends/classmate/teammates always works.
+1
Level 37
Oct 25, 2020
2025: Pandemica
+2
Level 58
Oct 25, 2020
One of the worst names I've ever seen for a young girl was "Onastie" - Mom thought she was being clever by respelling "Honesty." But if you pronounce it phonetically, as most of us teachers do when reading unfamiliar children's names aloud, "O Nasty" can really open a kid up to cruel jokes. Some people just shouldn't have children ....
+1
Level 68
Oct 26, 2020
Abigail, Emma, Olivia? Did Downton Abbey have that much sway on my generation (late 20s - early 30s)?