Science Multiple Choice #2

Can you answer these multiple choice questions from the world of science?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: September 17, 2020
First submittedSeptember 16, 2020
Times taken12,147
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1. Which of these planets is the biggest?
Earth
Mars
Mercury
Venus
2. About what percent of the Earth's atmosphere is Oxygen?
0.4%
21%
90%
3. What is the name of the current geological epoch, which begin about 11,650 years ago?
Cretaceous
Holocene
Pleistocene
Although many scientists believe we are now in the anthropocene, an epoch defined by rapid human-caused changes
4. What has been the primary cause of the increase in the temperature of the Earth's atmosphere in recent decades?
Emission of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels
Increased brightness of the sun
Perturbations in the Earth's orbit
Volcanic activity
5. Which of these animals is most closely related to homo sapiens?
Humpback whale
Iguana
Monarch butterfly
Screech owl
6. What is the coldest possible temperature?
-40 °C
−273.15 °C
About -3.5 million °C
There is no limit
7. What is the approximate diameter of the universe?
About 100,000 light years
About 9.2 billion light years
We don't know, possibly infinite
8. Can a virus alter your DNA?
No
Yes
Retroviruses insert themselves into DNA. About 5-8% of the human genome comes from retroviruses.
9. About how much has the level of the sea risen since 1900?
0.2 meters
12 meters
200 meters
10. Is a tree-kangaroo a real animal?
No
Yes
11. What causes the sound of approaching objects to be at a higher pitch than receding objects?
Butterfly effect
Corialis effect
Doppler effect
Greenhouse effect
12. What is a telomere?
A method of magnification
A region of repetitive DNA which protects the end of a chromosome
A tear in spacetime, commonly known as a worm-hole
13. When did the non-avian dinosaurs go extinct?
12,000 B.C.
1.2 million years ago
66 million years ago
14. Is it possible to see Saturn from Earth with the naked eye?
No
Yes
Saturn is brighter than all but three stars (not including the Sun)
15. True or false. Every human has the same number of chromosomes.
True
False
Most people have 23 pairs of chromosomes. Some genetic disorders, such as Down syndome, cause people to have a different number.
16. About what percentage of an atom's weight is in its nucleus?
23.7%
50.1%
> 99.9%
+9
Level 72
Sep 17, 2020
The best estimate for the size of the universe is about 93 billion light years. Seems to me that there are 2 answers to this question that could be considered correct.
+4
Level 80
Sep 17, 2020
Uh, yeah. You can't include the technically correct answer and have it be wrong in favor of a philosophically more correct answer.
+10
Level ∞
Sep 17, 2020
93 billion light years is just what we can see. I suppose it is theoretically possible that we are in a simulation and the universe stops at exactly the point we can no longer see it. If that's what you're claiming, then good point.
+2
Level 90
Sep 17, 2020
It is a fact that we don't actually know the size of the universe, so "We don't know..." is the correct answer no matter what assumptions we do or don't make about what is or is not beyond what we can observe.
+7
Level 65
Sep 30, 2020
Still a poor questions in my opinion - most of any question regarding the universe could have a plausible answer of "not entirely sure"
+2
Level 62
Oct 2, 2020
I agree with stevediverse. I wish more of the scientific community would use the "I don't know" answer when that is truly the case. Instead they just hypothesize and make theories with questionable scientific evidence, and then the public begins to spread the information claiming it as fact.
+1
Level 60
Oct 5, 2020
The universe is all matter resulting from the big bang, and the limit of the speed of anything coming from that single point in time and space is the speed of light, and we know the age of the universe, so this is really not a good question. "Possibly infinite" is not a valid answer, from our current scientific understanding.
+1
Level ∞
Oct 5, 2020
@bostjan. The Big Bang did not happen from a single point. It happened everywhere at the same time. Also, the universe is expanding faster than the speed of light. All of this is, of course, very confusing. But the question is correct.
+1
Level 60
Feb 23, 2021
The Big Bang is indeed a model of the early universe that started as a singularity. After seeing your comment, I think it is more clear that the issue boils down to scientific modeling versus religious dogma. Please remove the question.
+1
Level ∞
Feb 23, 2021
The question is correct. But don't take my word for it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universe

"Because we cannot observe space beyond the edge of the observable universe, it is unknown whether the size of the universe in its totality is finite or infinite. Estimates suggest that the whole universe, if finite, must be more than 250 times larger than the observable universe. Some disputed estimates for the total size of the universe, if finite, reach as high as..."

+1
Level 60
Feb 24, 2021
Thanks for trying to make the options clearer; however, I'm still not satisfied. The question asks the "approximate" diameter of the universe. Approximate implies estimation, so any question of the form "what is the estimated/approximate ____" should not have "I/we don't know" as a valid answer, especially when the known universe has a very measurable diameter. Secondly, I don't know why wikipedia says that the universe is infinite. All of modern science's best cosmological models have the universe with a finite dimensionality. Perhaps if the question was reworded "What is the exact diameter of the universe," the answer would be clear from those options, but as it is worded, the question is not correctly answered by any of the options.
+2
Level 60
Feb 24, 2021
Also, and this is not a particular route I want to argue, since it's a little fringe, but there are some who consider the universe to end wherever anything going on beyond that point no longer has any interaction at all with anything else. That somewhat valid definition of the term (the definition cannot yet be discarded on logical grounds, even if it likely will someday) is necessarily punished by the question. Ultimately, it's up to you to decide what to do, but I recommend removing the question if it can't be reworded clearly. - or at least run it by a qualified Cosmologist and see what he or she thinks.
+3
Level ∞
Sep 17, 2020
But in any case changed the wrong answer to 9.2 billion light years so that a little knowledge is not worse than no knowledge.
+1
Level 80
Sep 19, 2020
I recommend 28 billion light years. Most people know that the universe is about 14 billion years old, and nothing is faster than the speed of light, and so figure that the radius of the universe can be no larger than 14 billion light years and the diameter no larger than 28 billion. Then the number is based on logic, but it still punishes ignorance (as opposed to the observable universe vs. whole universe debate which punished knowledge).
+1
Level 60
Feb 24, 2021
Actually, if you flashed a light in every direction away from you at t=0, the diameter of the sphere of light particles at t=14 G y would be exactly 28 G ly in your frame of reference.
+2
Level 39
Sep 30, 2020
There is the 'Observable Universe' and 'The Universe'. Although we can roughly measure the size of the observable universe by measuring it's rate of expansion, we cannot be sure if this observable universe is the entire thing in itself or if it is embedded into a larger and much more complex outer universe.

We cannot interact with the outer universe and don't know if the laws of physics as we know in our universe, hold in this region. Think of it as our observable universe being an air bubble floating in the larger ocean which is the actual universe.

+2
Level 31
Sep 30, 2020
usually, it is called the size of observable universe, leaving room for the universe to be potentially infinite
+16
Level 68
Sep 18, 2020
I'd change atom's weight to mass
+5
Level 38
Sep 30, 2020
Definitely. Weight is just gravitational force between two objects. Mass is definitely what it should be changed to, it's just inaccurate to use weight.
+7
Level 80
Sep 18, 2020
Wait... the tagline for Jurassic Park was "An adventure 65 million years in the making." Has it really been a million years since that movie came out? Time flies.
+4
Level 90
Sep 18, 2020
Wait, you mean Hollywood got something scientifically inaccurate? I may have to re-watch "The Core."
+5
Level 84
Sep 18, 2020
Let's see. I was 17 when the movie came out. I feel about 1,000,017 now. Yep, checks out.
+8
Level ∞
Sep 19, 2020
The movie should been entitled "Mostly-Cretaceous Park".
+8
Level 85
Sep 30, 2020
Note to self: Don't hire this guy to be my marketing manager.
+2
Level 71
Nov 16, 2020
It seems it's a recent modification, cause in fact the commonly accepted date used to be 65 million years. I read many books about dinosaurs when I was a kid, including actual paleonthology books, and watched documentaries, and it was always 65. The 66 date seems to come from a study from 2013, which concluded, and I quote, "66,038,000 years ago - give or take 11,000 years".
+2
Level 66
Sep 18, 2020
15/16 :)

For some reason I thought Mars was larger than Earth...

+1
Level 85
Sep 30, 2020
Mars is actually about half the size of Earth :)
+4
Level 51
Sep 30, 2020
The question on climate change is dubious. We still can't be certain that CO2 emissions are the primary cause, though they are doubtless a factor. Also technically the greenhouse effect would be the answer. CO2 Emmisions themselves do not warm up the Earth.
+3
Level 58
Sep 30, 2020
And yet, 95% of us got it right.....
+7
Level 61
Sep 30, 2020
although we can never be certain, scientific consensus seems to be that it’s now beyond reasonable doubt that CO2 emissions leading to the greenhouse effect are the primary cause.
+4
Level 38
Sep 30, 2020
CO2 is a greenhouse gas, so yes it does act to warm the earth up. Although you're correct there are other gases attributing to global warming.

It's pretty hard to debate at this point that humans are having a huge impact on our climate though.

+1
Level 48
Sep 30, 2020
From my understanding, the greenhouse affect is only worsened by carbon emissoins. Which does warm the earth. But its hard to say how much of an effect this actually has on the global warming. Some theories suggest that the earth has been naturally warming for over a century.
+7
Level ∞
Sep 30, 2020
It's a common rhetorical trick. We can't be certain of anything. Technically yes, we can't be sure of climate change. Neither can we be sure of gravity. Or the existence of other people. The entire universe could be a simulation.

If you are going to take a position that is in opposition to scientific consensus and common sense, then come armed with something stronger than "we can't be sure". Post evidence at the very least.

+1
Level 61
Oct 1, 2020
scientific fact has become consensus now?
+1
Level 62
Oct 2, 2020
I wonder why you chose to include this question. I would disagree that it is common sense. There certainly are scientists that agree that CO2 emissions from human activity are to blame. But there are also scientists who disagree. Those that agree seem to make up the consensus because their message is broadcasted much louder, where the opposing view is intentionally muted. I love that there is a quiz on scientific facts, but I hardly consider this a fact.
+4
Level 34
Oct 2, 2020
The entirety of science really is based on consensus. In science there literally are not absolute facts, just theories that hold well to model the universe.

You can always find "a" scientist that disagrees, or several; but the overwhelming consensus (which represents our best current model) is that climate change, as we see it occurring now, is primarily caused by human activities.

If greenhouse effect is to blame, then fine; but to claim that the greenhouse effect is responsible *rather* than humans would be like a drunk driver claiming that it was simply a transfer of momentum and rapid acceleration that killed the family of four, "not me." I would argue increased CO2 emissions is a valid answer for a cause of climate change.

+4
Level 23
Sep 30, 2020
All I would say is “corialis” is spelt “coriolis”
+2
Level 62
Oct 2, 2020
agree
+1
Level 36
Sep 30, 2020
100%
+3
Level 52
Sep 30, 2020
12/16 I'm something of a scientist myself
+2
Level 63
Sep 30, 2020
/begin/began/
+1
Level 35
Sep 30, 2020
Do jetpunkers google answers? Or am I just dumb?
+1
Level 55
Sep 30, 2020
i am dumb apparently
+2
Level 71
Oct 1, 2020
"Saturn is brighter than all but three stars (not including the Sun)" - I think that's a mistake. This list: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_brightest_natural_objects_in_the_sky ...... says it's the 9th brightest at maximum brightness, which makes sense since the other planets are closer.
+2
Level ∞
Oct 1, 2020
The question is correct. Saturn is brighter than all but three stars. No where does it say that Saturn is brighter than Jupiter, the moon, etc...
+1
Level 57
Apr 9, 2021
But what does it mean? "All but three stars"? Where?

It makes no sense without context.

+1
Level 46
Oct 1, 2020
I would reconsider the answer about the coldest temperature.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/01/130104143516.htm#:~:text=2-,A%20temperature%20below%20absolute%20zero%3A%20Atoms%20at%20negative%20absolute%20temperature,hottest%20systems%20in%20the%20world&text=Summary%3A,getting%20colder%20than%20zero%20kelvin.

+2
Level 79
Oct 12, 2020
Not really. It's asking for the coldest temperature which is 0 Kelvin.

It's not asking for the lowest value of temperature. If you read about your link more you'll find that even though they created a state with negative Kelvin values, that state is hotter than positive temperatures due to the definition of the Kelvin scale.

It goes from +0 to +∞ to -∞ to -0 with increasing "hotness".

https://www.quantum-munich.de/119947/Negative-Absolute-Temperatures

+1
Level 67
Oct 1, 2020
Virus can alter the DNA on some of my cells but they can't alter MY DNA as a concept it's still my DNA, that's a weridly phrased question
+2
Level ∞
Oct 1, 2020
Viruses alter your DNA and this altered DNA is then passed down to your children. Your DNA is very much changed. It's an important concept to understand.
+3
Level 67
Jan 3, 2021
I think maybe he means something like even if it is altered it is still my dna. Gosh now I am even getting my own brain in a twist haha. But I think he is aiming for the more philosophical/semantics approach.

like if what yours is now mine, is it still yours or is it mine..

+1
Level 63
Oct 2, 2020
I feel the chromosome question is a little misleading. Humans, as a species, do in fact all have 23 pairs of chromosomes.There's no sub-species with a different count. That's like saying that Humans don't all have two legs, because on very rare occasions people with a birth defect (for lack of a better word) are born without them. Maybe change the wording?
+3
Level ∞
Oct 2, 2020
The question is phrased as intended. If I asked "does every human have two legs", the correct answer would clearly be no.
+1
Level 63
Oct 5, 2020
Yes, I'm not saying it's incorrect - I just think it's misleading. If it's intentionally so, then so be it!
+2
Level 71
Nov 16, 2020
As he pointed out, it's not misleading in terms of the wording cause it says "every", alluding to the totality of humans. It can only be misleading if your reading and comprehension are lacking or you don't know the meaning of the word "every".
+2
Level 67
Jan 3, 2021
I think it is a little bit of a trick question but it is part of the fun. You have to read and think carefully about and then weigh out the options what is likely to be meant.

Don't be caught off-guard but pay attention to details.

+2
Level 67
Jan 3, 2021
Ask yourself this, if the question would be; are there people with a different amount of chromosome pairs, what would your answer be.