Shared Prefixes Quiz #4

Each pair of words starts with the same prefix. Guess the prefix.
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: December 4, 2019
First submittedApril 11, 2014
Times taken22,112
Rating4.12
6:00
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Words
Octopus, Octagon
Megabyte, Megaphone
Underbelly, Underbrush
Dystopia, Dyslexia
Heterosexual, Heterodox
Mistreat, Mischief
Extramarital, Extradition
Antiaircraft, Antisocial
Decimate, Deciliter
Nanosecond, Nanotechnology
Hemoglobin, Hemophiliac
Quadratic, Quadricep
Psychopath, Psychiatry
Ultraviolet, Ultraorthodox
Simultaneous, Simulacrum
Somnambulism, Somniferous
Epidermis, Epilogue
Pandemic, Panacea
Magnanimous, Magnitude
Memento, Memorize
Orthodox, Orthodontist
+2
Level 80
Apr 14, 2014
"Hemophiliac" is misspelled.
+1
Level ∞
Apr 14, 2014
Fixed
+4
Level 74
Jul 23, 2014
Please also accept haemo-globin/philiac, which is how it is spelled outside the United States.
+1
Level ∞
Jul 23, 2014
Okay
+1
Level 80
Aug 14, 2014
The UK, Western Europe, and some British Commonwealth countries is not the entire rest of the world outside of the United States.
+4
Level 44
Aug 14, 2014
a taste of their own medicine
+1
Level 80
Aug 18, 2014
Having taught English in several countries where American English was always preferred, I think I have some authority to say that he is in fact wrong. Even if "most" was true, that's still not the entire rest of the world. American English is preferred, amongst other places, by the majority of people, schools, and businesses in South Korea, Japan, The Philippines, Taiwan, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, the UAE, Kuwait, Qatar, etc. I currently work for a British company with mostly British employees where part of the job is teaching English- and we are using American text books and an American curriculum. Last year I was working for Saudi Aramco, the largest company in the country and most profitable company in the world, and the official language of the company is American English.
+2
Level 80
Aug 18, 2014
also, it's absolutely wrong to call British English "standard English." It's not. American English is in fact more commonly used, and even if it weren't, there is no official standard for the English language. You guys also cannot claim to have an academy that polices and regulates the language in the same way that the Spanish do. There isn't one. In addition, British English has changed, mutated and degraded more over the past 400 years than American English has, so you can't even say that it is more original or pure. Ask any linguist who knows what he's talking about and he'll tell you the same thing.
+4
Level 44
Feb 28, 2017
This is a pointless argument as I do not believe anybody can claim to be the "authority" on which is more common. Even Googling doesnt give a definitive answer. British English is however referred to as standard English here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_American_and_British_English It's also my preference and what i've encountered on the African continent.
+3
Level 54
Feb 28, 2017
Often (especially in Romance languages) when a word is similar to English, it is similar to the British English form of the word (for example, the French 'théâtre'). And in an etymological sense, British English, in some form, predates American by over six hundred years.
+8
Level 48
Feb 28, 2017
Kalbahamut, the language is called English not American and forever will be...so yes, "standard English" can be considered British English
+2
Level 59
Feb 28, 2017
To all of you, please take a look at this map before making any claims about how either British or American English is "more standard": en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Google_Eng_Accent.png
+8
Level 78
Feb 28, 2017
I thought Kalbahamut made a good point that there is no "standard" English because the language keeps changing. None of us speak Anglo-Frisian, Middle English, or Early Modern English. The Oxford Dictionary adds new words every three months. Some regions maintain specific dialects. Grammar rules and spellings change, too. Who cares who has the older or "better" form of English? Let's celebrate our differences and keep using the language before it evolves into nothing more than emojis and phrases such as lol and ttyl.
+2
Level 61
Mar 1, 2017
So you support the dumbing down of language then, interesting
+3
Level 81
Sep 9, 2018
The "dumbing down of language" is A. inevitable and B. almost as old as language itself.
+2
Level 67
Oct 8, 2019
This is really childish..
+1
Level 73
Oct 19, 2019
The English speak English and won't be told by Americans how to do so.
+3
Level 81
Jan 31, 2020
Oh bœy, hære we go again.
+2
Level 80
Oct 14, 2020
Afro: someone writing something down on Wikipedia doesn't mean it's correct.
Aesthus: that's incorrect, insofar as, as I explained, British English has changed much more than American English over the last six hundred years. So, in its current form, no, British English definitely does not predate American English. At all.
akbadry: only by ignorant people who don't really know what they're talking about or have some culturally chauvinistic axe to grind. You know the Angles were a Germanic people who migrated to Britain, right? So maybe we should call German "standard English?" Yeah.. no... that's not how it works.
MUFC: I'm against the dumbing down of people but they persist against my protests. I guess you missed the part about how British English has changed more than American English, which is an uncontroversial fact.
conflakes: it also doesn't even really happen. Language is dynamic.
Sif: yes
blizzrd: reminds me of Eric Cartman: ignorant but defiant.
+1
Level 80
Oct 14, 2020
most of the comments I was originally responding to aren't even here anymore... but people still responding to me...
+1
Level 53
Oct 14, 2020
So would you say the French spoken in France isn't proper French as Canadian French still retain many characteristics of 17th century French
+1
Level 80
Oct 14, 2020
^ Are you talking to me? That's not similar to anything I was saying. Also, I don't know. I don't know as much about French. But I know that The Académie Française has no equivalent in the English language.

I never said that American English is "proper" English because it is less changed - I have said that others, who very often make the assertion that British English is "proper" English because American English is somehow degraded or altered versus the original, are making a weak and specious argument based on a false premise.
+2
Level 80
Oct 14, 2020
If your position on which version of the language is "proper" or "international" is based on:

- which variety is older in its current form
- which is closer to the original form of the language
- which is more widely spoken around the world
- which has the most native speakers
- which is more popular or desired to be learned at English teaching facilities

then the evidence points to American English being the correct answer.

If your position is based on which version you personally prefer or some other kind of smug condescension, then you are probably a jerk.

My personal opinion is that there is no "proper" English, and I think that opinion is pretty well backed-up by the facts.
+4
Level 68
Aug 14, 2014
Please make more quizzes like this. I enjoyed it.
+8
Level 77
Nov 4, 2015
Anyone else read "globin" as "goblin"?
+2
Level 49
Feb 28, 2017
*raises hand*
+9
Level 72
Feb 28, 2017
I even typed "hob"
+4
Level 67
Oct 26, 2017
Now I want to make a D&D monster called a hemo-goblin.
+2
Level 52
Apr 17, 2020
I tried 'hob' first too!
+1
Level 62
Oct 14, 2020
YES I WAS SO CONFUSED WHEN I READ THAT AT FIRST
+1
Level 69
Feb 28, 2017
Wouldn't of these technically be roots and not prefixes? I'm a bit of a novice in etymology.
+1
Level 53
Feb 28, 2017
Using metric units isn't really fair because any metric prefix works with them
+5
Level 53
Feb 28, 2017
But not always with both words. Kilobyte, yes, kilophone, no....
+5
Level 17
Dec 1, 2018
So THAT'S why nobody ever answers the centiphone when I call!
+1
Level 81
Jan 31, 2020
Never use the teraphone. The government will be listening.
+3
Level 58
Mar 1, 2017
Kept thinking "Diagon" for the __agon one... Taking too many Harry Potter quizes on here I think!
+1
Level 60
Mar 3, 2017
It didn't help that we spell deciliter "decilitre" here in Australia. Still managed 18 despite the Americocentric spelling.
+1
Level 66
Mar 4, 2017
Exactly the same here. Had to groan that I didn't think of litre being liter once I saw it.
+2
Level 77
Nov 17, 2018
The correct spelling is quadriceps. It's already singular, so taking the s off is just a misspelling.
+1
Level 43
Oct 14, 2020
Its wierd the may my brain can't unsee wrong answers - once it allocates Aca to demic and Lat to itude its really difficult to make it blank that out and restart.
+2
Level 67
Oct 14, 2020
The prefix PARA also works for both SEXUAL and DOX
+1
Level 64
Oct 14, 2020
maybe is it harder for english speaking people, but i found it easier (i'm frenchspeaking) probably because of the latin and greek roots
+1
Level 51
Oct 14, 2020
Phew - that was hard! Enjoyed it though.
+1
Level 62
Oct 14, 2020
I really liked the quiz. There is just one thing that bugs me: The "-opus" vs. "-agon" clue is a bit misleading, as the prefix in that case is octo- or octa- and the rest of the word should be -pus or -gon. Still, it is the most guessed...
+1
Level 55
Oct 14, 2020
I would like to thank Pumat Sol for helping me with this quiz.
+2
Level 65
Oct 14, 2020
Not too difficult!
+1
Level 37
Oct 14, 2020
Shouldn't micro be allowed for second/technology as not only nano is a working prefix for those words?
+2
Level 71
Oct 14, 2020
Orthodox is used twice.
+1
Level 34
Oct 15, 2020
Good quiz apart from the US spelling eurgh
+1
Level 45
Oct 16, 2020
Pretty easy, only missed "quad."