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Spanish Loan Words Quiz

Somehow, these Spanish words have sneaked into the English language. Guess what they are.
The definition of the word is the English definition - not necessarily the Spanish one
Quiz by Quizmaster
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Last updated: August 30, 2018
First submittedAugust 7, 2010
Times taken28,390
Rating4.03
5:00
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Definition
Word
Papier-mâché decoration, filled with candy
Piñata
Liquor made from distilled agave
Tequila
One who takes justice into his own hands
Vigilante
Wide-brimmed hat
Sombrero
Beach hut
Cabana
Donkey
Burro
Naval fleet
Armada
Afternoon rest period
Siesta
Elevated plateau, surrounded by cliffs
Mesa
What one says when dodging a bull
Olé
Small grocery/liquor store, particularly
in New York City
Bodega
Definition
Word
Ruling council of a military dictatorship
Junta
Cowboy of Argentina and the Pampas
Gaucho
Spanish sausage
Chorizo
Masculine, in an exaggerated way
Macho
Crazy
Loco
Wild or not fully broken horse
Bronco
Public city square
Plaza
Spicy, green chili pepper
Jalapeño
Neighborhood
Barrio
Right now, ASAP
Pronto
Party, festival
Fiesta
+2
level 43
Aug 23, 2013
Good quiz.
+1
level 49
Sep 12, 2015
bodega is use mostly for wines establishments (e.g. winestore, winery) and I have heard it for a few restaurants which have an ample selection of wines. It is also used in the same meaning as pantry.
+3
level 38
Oct 27, 2016
Perhaps this quiz is a little New York centric. But I have always herd of the work Bodega used for neighborhood small grocery store. I remember it vividly because in my native land we have a similar word Botica, (which translates pharmacy) and when I first moved to NY I couldn't get it straight.
+1
level 65
Dec 29, 2015
I see you wrote Piñata, so it would be logical to write Cabaña as well, for Cabana isn't a word in Spanish. At least not that I've heard of, and I'm a native speaker
+2
level 67
Aug 14, 2018
My guess is that they're using the English spelling, reflecting the English pronunciation. When "piñata" is said in English, the "ñ" pronounced with the proper "nyuh" sound, and the same with "jalapeño," but "cabana" is pronounced with just a regular "n" sound.
+3
level 58
Dec 29, 2015
If I was ever in such a situation, the word I would speak when avoiding a bull would certainly not be 'ole'!!
+1
level 65
Dec 29, 2015
I tried every alternate spelling I could think of for "machismo". Didn't even dawn on me to try macho. Maybe accept "machismo"?
+1
level 73
Dec 30, 2015
i went with machismo as well..didn't even think about macho
+1
level 55
Feb 3, 2016
Same. Would like this allowed if it applies.
+1
level 57
Dec 30, 2015
I don't know where you live but these words are not part of my language.
+4
level 63
Dec 30, 2015
America has a lot of Spanish influence because of the Hispanic immigrants. Elsewhere in the world, we don't know anywhere near as many Spanish words just as general knowledge.
+3
level 67
Jan 1, 2016
Actually, there are a lot of Spanish-speaking Americans who aren't recent immigrants at all - particularly in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Can we please all agree to call the United States the United States?
+2
level 74
Apr 20, 2017
Too late.
+1
level 61
Mar 8, 2017
Many of these words aren't used in Canada either, (Burro, Branco, Barrio to name a few).
+1
level 70
Jan 21, 2018
Then you don't live in a very vibrant place. Melting pot - not melted pot. It's an ongoing process, forever evolving with the inclusion of new cultural influences. The result is a unique and dynamic outcome that no other country has, not even Canada. Canada has its own melting pot, of course, which means that the two countries, so alike in many ways, will forever be culturally distinct - and each is better for it.
+1
level 70
Jan 21, 2018
(My reply was mainly directed to the person who appeared to be a US resident who had never heard any of these terms. But I did have in mind the comments made by the Canadian person whose reply mine followed, making it appear that the words were directed to them. To that person - because there is so little Hispanic migration to Canada, I wouldn't expect these influences to cross the border, except via the media, perhaps, in TV shows and movies. Just not in daily, local experiences.)
+1
level 67
Jan 19, 2016
I kept trying "palapa" for beach hut, since that's what they're called in Southern California.
+2
level 57
Feb 28, 2016
Fun quiz but I think it favoured some obscurities over more widely known loan words. I'd put matador, amigo, burrito, mosquito, tamale, poncho and 'ay carumba' and instead of bodega, barrio, chorizo, mesa and burro.
+1
level 74
Mar 3, 2016
Yes, you've listed words which are in common usage in the UK. Many in the quiz are not.
+1
level 39
Jun 24, 2017
Hmm. I think you'd struggle to find many people in the UK who have ever heard of tamale.
+2
level 62
May 25, 2019
Im not in the uk or usa (or a spanish or even romance language speaking country) and i have heard of tamale, movies expose you to many things. Eventhough i hardlly watch them.
+4
level 38
Oct 27, 2016
To Tshalla: Only inhabitants of the United States call themselves and/or are called "Americans". The populations of the other areas you've mentioned, call themselves refer to themselves as Mexican, Jamaicans, Venezuelans, Arubians' etc., etc. - So when one hears the word American, one should automatically relate it to the United States.
+2
level 49
Jun 20, 2017
People from Europe don't call themselves European, yet they consider themselves as such. Same goes with Asian or African people. One should automatically relate it to the inhabitants or people born in the Americas.
+3
level 67
Feb 8, 2018
When you hear the song "America the beautiful' one assumes it means the USA not the continents.
+1
level 67
Apr 17, 2018
Okay, so what do you call someone from the United States of America, in English?
+2
level 62
Jan 14, 2019
@marlowepi a usaer
+1
level 67
Aug 4, 2019
@Sifhraven - Can you provide a link to show that anyone, anywhere in the English-speaking world uses that term besides you?
+1
level 64
Aug 5, 2019
Citizens from the EU call themselves Europeans, as do people from Serbia, or Ukraine, or Belarus for instance, in the same way people from the US call themselves Americans as do citizens from Chile, or Mexico
+1
level 45
Oct 17, 2017
I thought a beach hut was a jacal. I personally associate the word cabana with a log cabin.
+1
level ∞
Jul 7, 2018
Jacal is not a word in English.
+2
level 67
Feb 8, 2018
I had to dodge a bull once after it chased me across a field and what I shouted wasn't Ole ....
+1
level 26
Feb 11, 2018
Add “taco”, “burrito” and “nachos”.
+1
level 39
Jul 25, 2018
...all spanish american...bodega over here is a musical festival...
+1
level 83
Mar 16, 2019
In the description for the quiz you should say "snuck" instead of 'sneaked.'
+1
level 63
Aug 24, 2019
if really spanish sausage is called chorizo I wonder what you put in a hot dog. That thing is called "salsicha".
+1
level 44
Oct 29, 2019
Kept trying ahora and horita for 'right now, asap'
+1
level 50
Oct 29, 2019
I grew up saying "ahora" and "ahorita" for "right now". "Pronto" meant "quickly" or "hurry". A "bodega" was used to describe a "warehouse". It is all a matter of where one learned their Spanish. In Mexico, "coche" can be used for "car" (literally translated coach), but in other countries "coche" was someone with bad manners, it was short for "cochino", or pig. Good quiz