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Spelling and Pronunciation

Correctly spell these words based on their pronunciation.
All the answers are a single word
Last updated: October 12, 2016
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Pronunciation
Word
Flem
Phlegm
Sham pain
Champagne
Keen wah
Quinoa
Urb
Herb
Ree ceet
Receipt
Shall ay
Chalet
Plack
Plaque
Pronunciation
Word
Rah pore
Rapport
Fur low
Furlough
Fa hee ta
Fajita
Pear a dime
Paradigm
Cash ay
Cachet
Ahn wee
Ennui
Po pore ee
Potpourri
Pronunciation
Word
Ron day voo
Rendezvous
Hay nuss
Heinous
Air oo dite
Erudite
Die us
Dais
Huts puh
Chutzpah
Ay dill vice
Edelweiss
Cocks un
Coxswain
+4
level 39
Jan 11, 2015
Some of these words I've never even heard of. I was a little disappointed with my 13/21.
+1
level 37
Apr 7, 2017
I got 5/21 so don't feel too bad.
+1
level 27
May 29, 2017
I got 0 of 21. I am quite embarrassed.
+1
level 36
May 29, 2017
Agreed. I struggled to figure out what words they were; probably because I have a limited vocabulary. Also, My French class helped me with a couple. :)
+1
level 27
May 30, 2018
Don't worry. I got a big fat zero on this quiz.
+1
level 79
Feb 12, 2015
I never realized dais had this pronunciation as an alternate to day us. That takes care of my learn-one-thing-a-day requirement.
+6
level 67
Feb 12, 2015
Dais isn't pronounced "die-us", it's pronounce "day-us" by most people. And in Britain you pronounce the H in herb.
+1
level 80
Feb 12, 2015
Sorry. Cheque a dictionary, "dei-us" is even listed first as a pronunciation. (Maybe because of it being alphabetical?)
+2
level 80
Feb 12, 2015
I blame being sick on writing "cheque". I ment "check" of course.
+1
level 58
Feb 12, 2015
dei-us isn't the what he used in the quiz. In the quiz, it DIE-us. Totally different.
+1
level 80
Feb 13, 2015
Sorry Symmetric, "die-us" of course, can't believe I typoed "ie" vs "ei", it's one my my all time pet peeves that people can't spell those right!
+1
level 65
Feb 14, 2015
Uh...you can hear the correct pronunciation here. It's pronounced like day-us, not die-us. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dais
+2
level 69
Oct 18, 2016
And you meant "meant" :)
+1
level 23
Oct 31, 2017
Exqueese me there are different types of English. Examples = Canadian English, American English etc. So there are multiple ways to say words in English. ARGUMENT IS OVER Period.
+1
level 43
Jan 17, 2018
But I don't know of any regional accent which pronounces it "die-us". I can't just say that horse is pronounced the same as fish because "There are multiple ways to say words, argument over, PERIOD"
+1
level 51
Aug 29, 2018
Actually DapperAlpaca, as far as I know, 24 million odd Australians pronounce it "die us"
+1
level 44
Feb 12, 2015
Under Habsburg, Charles V, ruler of the Holy Roman Empire and King of Spain, all fiefs in the current Netherlands region was united into the Seventeen Provinces, which also included most of present-day Belgium, Luxembourg,
+1
level 70
Feb 16, 2017
And not only that, but you also need the jack of diamonds and the queen of spades to make a pinochle.
+4
level 40
Feb 12, 2015
Why not also allow cache? As in clear your cache.
+1
level 54
Nov 13, 2018
Pretty sure that's normally pronounced "caysh".
+1
level 55
Feb 12, 2015
for Keen Wa it sounds rather like 'chinois'. I would pronounce it "kin ower"
+2
level 68
Feb 12, 2015
Why do Americans drop the 'h' in 'herb'? Always confused me, that one. (While I'm at it, I also never understood why they pronounce 'Craig' as 'Cregg', and 'Graham' as 'Gram') "I'd better take my umbrella, because outside my ouse it's renning." :P Nice people. Weeeeeird pronunciation ;-)
+1
level 44
Feb 12, 2015
How else would one pronounce Graham?
+2
level 45
May 16, 2015
Another American pronunciation of a name that I don't understand is Gerard; here it's said Ger- ad but over the pond it's Gerr-Ard, with emphasis on the Ard, like the surname Gerrard. I've read that Gerard Butler hates it so much that in the US he refers to himself as Gerry instead.
+2
level 71
Mar 1, 2016
Same as Maurice (pronounced Morris), Caramel (not pronounced Carmel), Mirror (Mirr?)...The pronunciation of herb in the US annoys me too, but then Brits tend to pronounce Anthony as Antony There's no consistency
+1
level 75
May 29, 2017
I'm in the US mid-south and I say Gray'-um, not Gram. Pronunciations vary among cultures and ethnic groups, too. I pronounce Jarrell and Terrell as Jair'-ul and Tair'-ul, but my African-American friends pronounce them as Juh-rell' and Tuh-rell'. The Spanish pronunciation of Juanita is Wahn-eet'-uh, but around here the name is often pronounced Juh-nee'-tah. The two that really get me are Jordan and Yvonne. I say Jore'-dun, but relatives in the Deep South pronounce it Jur'-dun. I say Yiv'-ahn but relatives in AR say Wye'-vahn, and relatives in Michigan say Ee'-vahn. So don't complain about US pronunciations unless you complain about a specific person's because chances are the person next to him says it differently.
+1
level 66
Jan 17, 2018
grantdon - All of those words are pronounced differently in different areas of the US. For instance, I'm from the mid-Atlantic East Coast of the US, and I pronounce them more-EES, CARE-uh-mel, and MEER-or, respectively. Some other areas pronounce them the way you describe (the "caramel" one is particularly contentious), but yeah, as far as I know most of the US uses "herb" with a silent "H." And to us, it sounds weird to hear the "H" pronounced because to us that turns it into a man's name rather than a culinary item.

And hey, it's not like the British don't have plenty of words they pronounce with a silent "H" at the beginning as well, unless you plug the sound in at the beginning of "hour," "honour," and "honest."
+1
level 47
Dec 17, 2015
Americans actually do pronounce the h in house, albeit a few weird accents in the far reaches of the country, and we pronounce 'rain' the same way we pronounce 'rein.'
+1
level 59
Oct 16, 2016
Dropping the h comes from French usage. As in the way some English people regard "an 'otel" as correct rather than "a hotel". There seems to be a belief that French usage is "posher".
+1
level 67
May 30, 2017
"An hotel" is correct, just as "an historic opportunity" would be correct. A word beginning with aspirated (pronounced) H and the stress not on the first syllable can take "a" or "an"; both are correct. So "a hotline" and "a horseman" but either "a hotel" or "an hotel", either "a historic opportunity" or "an historic opportunity"... but if you said "an history book" it would be wrong. English are weird.
+1
level 38
Jun 21, 2018
Actually, I believe that in French is would l'hotel (pronounced l'otel)
+1
level 52
Oct 22, 2018
a / an is an INdefinite article, in French it is un or une....the is a definite article, in French it is le, la or l', so, divantilya, you are incorrect
+1
level 66
Jan 17, 2018
What Americans drop the "h" in "house"? To my American ears, that makes it sound like someone putting on a cockney accent.
+1
level 39
Feb 12, 2015
Ouch, haven't heard of a lot of those last words. 15 correct
+1
level 70
Feb 12, 2015
Good quiz. Got stuck on On Wee thinking it could be ornery because that's how a child would probably say it. Did eventually get ennui though.
+1
level 42
Feb 12, 2015
I read about Quinoa before I heard it pronounced. I asked in the health food store if they had any QUIN-OH-A, pronouncing it just like it looks on the page. It took a while to sort out - these little things are all fun.
+1
level 28
Feb 13, 2015
I had never heard of quinoa (and my computer's spell-check doesn't recognize it), and I have only seen ennui and dais written, at least to the best of my knowledge. So I guess I don't need to be too ashamed I missed those three. Decent quiz!
+1
level 70
Jun 11, 2016
Quinoa is technically a seed, but you cook and eat it like a grain. It has a bit of a nutty flavor, is happily un-mushy, and holds up well with veggies and dressing for a cold side-dish salad, or as part of many great hot entree recipes. In our house, we just do it up in our rice cooker (works perfectly!) as a side dish – it goes well with anything you would have chosen rice to accompany. Try it! You'll like it! P.S. Note my username! ;-)
+2
level 75
Feb 13, 2015
To make the point that English spelling is screwed up my Phonetics professor in college wrote the word "ghoti" on the board and asked us to try and say it. After we all failed he revealed that the word was "fish." He spelled it using the "gh" from "enough," the "o" from "women," and the "ti" from "nation." Then we started our lesson on IPA.
+1
level 80
Feb 13, 2015
IPA <3
+2
level 67
Oct 20, 2015
Come on Kalbahamut, that is such an old joke!
+2
level 75
May 29, 2017
But still works as a great lesson. :)
+1
level 43
Jan 17, 2018
But it would be pronounced "fosh" then
+1
level 52
Jan 31, 2018
Women = 'wih-min'.
+1
level 52
Oct 12, 2018
George Bernard Shaw, i believe
+1
level 35
Feb 16, 2015
I can't make out what half of these words are supposed to say written like this.
+1
level 50
Feb 19, 2015
I'm thanking Divergent for erudite :')
+1
level 31
May 9, 2018
Yeah, me too. Coincidentally, I just finished that book today. Loved it.
+1
level 81
Feb 27, 2015
This probably makes me kind of an idiot, but I was so convinced that it was spelled caché, that I actually went off-site to copy-paste it with the accented e, imagining that it might actually matter.
+1
level 14
Mar 12, 2015
I got 14, most of the words were on my Spelling Bee study list.
+1
level 31
Mar 21, 2015
This quiz is very difficult for me because I'm French. I don't know all these words. English's pronunciation of French words is amusing. I hope my message is understandable because my English is not very well.
+1
level 67
Oct 20, 2015
I wish I could speak French as well as you do English.
+1
level 67
May 30, 2017
Les anglophones empruntent des mots au français, les mâchent avec leurs gros dents, et les crachent tout à fait méconnaissables aux francophones. :)
+1
level 43
Jan 17, 2018
Is big teeth an insult or compliment?
+1
level 71
Apr 8, 2015
Why not just use IPA to describe the pronunciation? It would take away any ambiguity and make it much simpler for everyone.
+1
level 26
Sep 29, 2015
are you serious? herb is not pronounced "urb".
+1
level 73
Oct 4, 2015
Unless the quiz was set by a Jamaican, as in de... :)
+1
level 67
Oct 20, 2015
Not great, the hints are pretty bad, I think it is maybe too difficult to write phonetic sounds that will suit all people taking the quiz. When making a quiz give it a friend or relative first and see how they go before throwing it in at the deep end.
+1
level 69
Oct 18, 2016
Herb is not alone. There is hour, honest, heir, honor and I'm sure, a few others.
+1
level 9
Nov 4, 2016
I had no idea what most of the pronunciations were, cocks un? i would have never guessed. I got the ones right that i did know though.
+1
level 29
Nov 28, 2016
Since chutzpah is not an English word, multiple spellings should be accepted. The word is Yiddish for nerve, as in having some nerve to only accept one spelling for a word spelled with a different alphabet.
+1
level 48
Dec 11, 2016
Hmm... Excuse me, but I do believe I've learned from Mr. Walken's character that the accurate pronunciation is "shom pon ya" ;P
+1
level 67
May 30, 2017
And I learned from Ms. Lumley's character that it's pronounced "champers".
+1
level 70
Feb 16, 2017
QM, you might consider capitalizing the accentuated syllable in each phonetically-spelled word.
+1
level 27
Apr 5, 2017
Most of this quiz is working out what it's supposed to be pronounced as. Also say "Urb" is only an American thing
+1
level 61
May 29, 2017
Stupid Normans spreading their ridiculous French spellings that make no sense in a Germanic language!
+1
level 49
May 29, 2017
En-wee or On-wee, but NOT ahn-wee.
+1
level 70
May 29, 2017
Yup.
+1
level 67
May 30, 2017
No, "ahn-wee" is correct. "enn-wee" and "ohn-wee" are incorrect.
+1
level 49
May 29, 2017
It's an honour to not get all of these - because it proves I don't speak the language 'stupid.'
+1
level 62
May 29, 2017
Re: the Chutzpah one - my first thought was Hotspur, like the football club :)
+1
level 66
May 29, 2017
I was just about to say that.
+1
level 75
May 29, 2017
I remember taking this quiz before which probably explains how I managed to get them all with 4:51 left. Still a great quiz.
+2
level 52
May 29, 2017
Who pronounces herb like urb????? you must be dizzy as
+1
level 66
Jan 17, 2018
Who else? The Americans!
+1
level 65
May 29, 2017
Since many are actually French words, as a native speaker they were easy for me. I missed only 2 words and they were words I've never heard before, so not bad.
+1
level 55
May 29, 2017
21/21 with 2:48 left and I'm a slow typist. :-)
+1
level 67
May 29, 2017
Got em all with 4:24 left! (I must revel in my few first-time 100-percent victories when I can. :) )
+1
level 74
May 30, 2017
I understand. 21/21 with 5:05 remaining here...
+1
level 56
May 29, 2017
Kept trying wrapper & rapper but wouldn't work
+1
level 56
May 30, 2017
Really shows how different American and UK pronunciations are. Isn't phonology cool?
+1
level 55
May 31, 2017
This quiz was fun if a little too easy. Could someone please make more of them?
+1
level 44
Jul 8, 2017
I personally pronounce Quinoa as Keen-oh-ah. For my misfortune I have no idea on what Dais and Ennui are, and never imagined the existence of a coxswain. Oh well, good quiz though.
+1
level 25
Oct 31, 2017
Wow, I guess I've been pronouncing words wrong my entire life ... :P
+1
level 15
Jan 15, 2018
5:26 left nailed it :)
+1
level 43
Jan 31, 2018
Fun quiz!
+1
level 28
Mar 13, 2018
I don't think urb was remotely fair.
+1
level 34
Mar 13, 2018
I would accept cockswain as a spelling of coxswain.
+1
level 8
Apr 8, 2018
what even are these words
+1
level 7
May 1, 2018
I am 8...
+2
level 63
May 9, 2018
A lot of these completely bamboozled me, but now I see the answers I realise it's a guide to how those words are pronounced in an American accent.
+1
level 38
Jun 21, 2018
Missed coxswain because I always mispronounce it as cock SWAIN!
+1
level 43
Jul 12, 2018
ander217. I agree with your comment, I consider it to be the same in UK, it depends where you are! every region has its quirks. Having said that, I think we all say Graham! To my ears it is Gray ham. I did not even realise that gram crackers where the same thing! I thought it was a grain or flour!
+1
level 72
Aug 8, 2018
I was tempted to put 'anus' but realised there was 'h' there.
+1
level 37
Nov 17, 2018
You should accept "ennoi" as an answer
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