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Stanley Kubrick Movies Quiz

In his career, Stanley Kubrick directed 13 movies. How many can you name?
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedMay 19, 2010
Last updatedJune 28, 2019
Times taken13,209
Rating4.37
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Year
Movie
1999
Eyes Wide Shut
1987
Full Metal Jacket
1980
The Shining
1975
Barry Lyndon
1971
A Clockwork Orange
1968
2001: A Space Odyssey
1964
Dr. Strangelove
Year
Movie
1962
Lolita
1960
Spartacus
1957
Paths of Glory
1956
The Killing
1955
Killer's Kiss
1953
Fear and Desire
+1
level 32
May 18, 2013
awesome quiz
+1
level 77
Jun 30, 2013
Got 4 and gave up, realized that I knew 4 more that I hadn't guessed. The first 4 he directed and Barry Lyndon I've never heard of before.
+2
level 40
Jun 30, 2013
I got 8 and forgot The Shining? Are you kidding me? :)
+3
level 76
Jun 30, 2013
Only 13 movies in 46 years? What a slacker.
+9
level 83
Jun 30, 2013
Only six of which are amongst the 100 highest-rated movies of all time at IMDB. So not only is he a slacker, he had less than a 50% success rate at making an all-time classic. What a schlub.
+3
level 72
Aug 10, 2018
I agree. Total chode.
+1
level 65
Jul 1, 2019
Nowhere near the Hitchcock Gold Standard of 53 films in 54 years. Kubrick should have made 45 films, not just a measly 13. What a klutz!
+2
level 61
Jul 1, 2013
I mean, he was fairly prolific until he finished The Shining. His first 11 movies were in a span of 27 years. That's like one every 30 months. Pretty standard. It's just the last two that make it look so drawn out. And judging by Eyes Wide Shut, he probably should have just stayed retired.
+1
level 32
Jul 1, 2013
Not his best movie, but still interesting IMO. More than just one of them have great moments but also very weak elements.
+1
level 77
Jul 9, 2013
I agree with jmellor.
+1
level 25
Apr 23, 2014
In hindsight, all of those delays were worth the wait. And many of those delays were partially caused by his perfectionism, his numerous failed attempts to get both films Napoleon and The Aryan Papers and other projects that never materialized due to too many numerous reasons (including fights with the various book authors and internal battles with studio heads). Also, Kubrick's final marriage German actress Christiane Harlan (m: 1959 until his death) and the subsequent birth of their children played a big roll in his becoming a family man, after his prior marriages failed.
+1
level 35
Apr 27, 2014
I just love every movie he made. It doesn't matter to me whether he was prolific or not. He contributed a lot to art and that should be enough. He directed thirteen wonderful feature films and three documentary shorts (that we know of), in addition to creating the concept to A.I. - that's a little more than billions of people do in their entire lives, isn't it? Furthermore, although Buñuel, Fellini, Godard, Bergman and Herzog, among some others, could be compared to him, Kubrick had a single, unique style of his own (I'm just trying to emphasize!). Anyway, all I'm saying is that he should be respected, even by those who can't enjoy his work.
+2
level 77
Dec 31, 2018
Kubrick definitely did *not* invent the concept of artificial intelligence. Come on. Even discounting things like Frankenstein, the Golem myth, or various creation myths that have existed forever and even just looking at the concept of computer intelligence in popular fiction we've got 1956's Forbidden Planet, Asimov's "I, Robot" published in 1950, the 1920 Czech science fiction play Rossum's Universal Robots, Erewhon published in 1872, and Darwin Among the Machines in the 1860s among many, many others that predate 2001.

Dartmouth College opened a workshop to research AI in 1956. Alan Turing described the "Turing Test" in 1950.
+2
level 77
Jun 30, 2019
Kubrick planned out the movie "A.I.", later directed by Spielberg. Not the concept of AI!
+1
level 77
Jun 30, 2019
I'm pretty sure that Mila is referencing 2001: A Space Odyssey, a science fiction film from 1968 about artificial intelligence, not A.I. by Steven Spielberg. And Mila was suggesting that in 1968 the concept of artificial intelligence was something new, which it wasn't. But I could be wrong.
+2
level 65
Jul 1, 2019
Clearly she means the movie A.I. which Kubrick worked on for some time. Which was later finished by Spielberg.
+1
level 77
Jul 1, 2019
If it was clear it would be clear.
+2
level 73
Jul 2, 2019
Seems pretty clear to me. You know it's okay to be wrong sometimes, Kal, don't you? ;)
+1
level 77
Jul 16, 2019
Yes and more than anyone I know I readily admit it when I am and welcome people pointing it out. Again, if it was clear it would be clear, and this comment thread would not exist.
+1
level 26
May 2, 2014
Why everyone forgets about Barry Lyndon, I'll never understand. It's easily his best film.
+1
level 50
Sep 29, 2015
It's ARGUABLY his best film. But then again, every film he made from The Killing forward is arguably his best film.
+1
level 76
Dec 22, 2016
I guess I should check out his early work. I only missed one from the left column, but only got one from the right.
+1
level 72
Aug 10, 2018
Paths of Glory barely remembered? What a shame, a truly great war movie.
+1
level 30
Jun 30, 2019
Best director ever. He has done "only" 13 films, but all of them became the top in their genre. Paths of glory is the best war film, Space Odyssey best scifi, Eyes wide shut best drama, or something like that. :)
+1
level 77
Jun 30, 2019
I like some of his movies but Eyes Wide Shut was crap, Space Odyssey is boring and far from the best science fiction film ever made; I've never seen Paths of Glory. I liked Full Metal Jacket but it was also far from the best war movie ever made. On the other hand, The Shining is pretty high up there on a list of top horror films.
+1
level 70
Jun 30, 2019
Calling '2001' boring is boring :P
+1
level 76
Jun 30, 2019
I think the only time I ever gave a film a one-star rating on IMDB was for 2001: A Space Odyssey. What a steaming pile of crap. I didn't just dislike it, I was angered and insulted by it. I know I'm in the minority here but I will say it...the emperor has no clothes!
+2
level 72
Jun 30, 2019
calling 2001 boring seems legit. now 2000 was exciting with your Y2K, and all.
+1
level 77
Jun 30, 2019
camus: because it's such a commonly cited criticism due to the fact that it's true? I apologize for my lack of originality.
+1
level 70
Jun 30, 2019
@kalbahamut: Yeah, it's getting lame if the common criticism towards the movie consists of just one word, which is of course not a fact since "boring" describes a subjective experience. I once read a slam of "2001" by Pauline Kael, who at least provided interesting arguments that (almost) convinced me. What I wrote wasn't in ill will against you though.
+1
level 77
Jul 1, 2019
All film criticism is arguably subjective, but if a film bores a large number of people it is boring- something that causes boredom.
+1
level 70
Jul 2, 2019
If we go by popular verdict, Transformers: Dark of the Moon is entertaining and Twilight is touching.
+1
level 77
Jul 16, 2019
If the vast and overwhelming majority of people are entertained by a film it's appropriate to call it entertaining. Pretty conceited to imply we shouldn't. Though I'm also sure that the percentage of people touched by Twilight is far smaller than the percentage of people bored by 2001, whether your sample size includes average audience members or even just premiere film critics.
+1
level 56
Aug 15, 2019
In this context, stating that some of Kubrick's films are the "best" in their particular genre is neither helpful nor accurate (albeit because determining the best or your favourite is entirely subjective). 2001, for example, is one of the most groundbreaking films ever made but it is boring for long stretches and is utterly unfathomable unless you've read the book. I think Kubrick is one of the most influential filmmakers of all time but that isn't saying he made the most entertaining films. The Killing and Strangelove excepted of course. But he did make some of the most thoroughly researched and impeccably produced films in the history of the medium. That's beyond argument.
+1
level 65
Jul 1, 2019
Dr. Strangelove, 2001, and the Shining are fantastic movies (and Spartacus is pretty good too). I must admit that I am a heretic though, as I enjoy 2010 even more than 2001, despite not being directed by the master.