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Things Named for Inventors Quiz

These objects were named for their inventors. Guess what they are.
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Enter invention here:
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Enter answers in the area marked "Enter invention here".

You can enter any answer, at any time - they don't have to be in order

Punctuation and capitalization don't matter on JetPunk.

Description
Invention
3-D puzzle popular in the 1980's
Rubik's cube
Amusement park ride
Ferris wheel
Decapitation machine
Device for measuring radiation
Geiger counter
Method of telegraph communication
Morse code
Raincoat made from rubberized fabric
Diagram that shows the union and
intersection of different sets
Venn diagram
Two pieces of bread with
fillings between them
Yoga-like exercise system
Used for canning fruit
Mason jar
Ice-rink smoother
19th century machine gun
with a crank
Gatling gun
Description
Invention
Marching band tuba
Sousaphone
S'more ingredient
Graham cracker
Rigid dirigible
Inkblots used by psychologists
Rorschach test
Method of reading for the blind
Braille
Place where cells are cultured
Petri dish
Early photographic process
Daguerreotype
Conical laboratory flask
Erlenmeyer flask
Laboratory equipment that
produces a gas flame
Bunsen burner
Device that demonstrates the
rotation of the Earth
Foucault pendulum
Large fighting knife
Bowie knife
AK-47
Kalashnikov
Answer Stats
Description
Invention
% Correct
Your %
+1
level 59
Jan 8, 2012
I knew Petri, but I could not remember how to spell it. Other than that, 19/24.
+4
level 66
Jan 8, 2012
Am I the only one who thinks "X Files" when confronted with Erlenmeyer flask as an answer?
+1
level 69
Dec 8, 2014
Nope :D
+2
level 58
Jun 21, 2015
I think of "Breaking Bad."
+2
level 47
Jul 12, 2018
You are not alone, and also, the truth is out there.
+2
level 45
Jan 8, 2012
No, and I don't think I am the only one who thought of Watchmen with the Rorschach test.
+1
level 33
Jan 8, 2012
21/24 totally spaced on Gatling and Bowie but I never would have gotten Kalashnikov, lol
+1
level 69
Apr 14, 2013
Here it's always called a Kalashnikov. I would never have remembered AK-47, if the question had been reversed.
+1
level 68
Oct 17, 2015
And what was Andrei Kirlilenko's uniform number when he played for the Utah Jazz? One guess.
+1
level 46
Jul 12, 2018
69
+1
level 62
Jul 12, 2018
Nice.
+1
level 73
Dec 8, 2014
22/24 Couldn't spell Rorschach, and had never heard the tem Kalashnikov - learned something new!
+1
level 49
Jan 21, 2015
lol I couldnt spell rorschach lol
+1
level 56
Aug 4, 2015
I blanked on Bowie. Didn't know Kalashnikov, either.
+1
level 14
Jan 8, 2012
Foucault's Pendulum, thank you Jimmy Neutron
+1
level 58
Jan 8, 2012
why use the word dirigible instead of airship?
+1
level 60
Jun 26, 2014
Couldn't an airship just be inflatable, as opposed to the 'rigid' clue.
+2
level 46
Dec 8, 2014
You learned a new word!
+4
level 73
Dec 8, 2014
why not? Dirigible is a fun word and was used more commonly at the time zeppelins were in common use anyway.
+1
level 35
Dec 9, 2014
why wasn't it a blimp?
+1
level 40
Dec 10, 2014
Blimps don't have a rigid frame I think.
+1
level 40
Jul 13, 2018
yakdog is correct. A rigid dirigible has a hard metal frame, whereas a blimp is simply inflated like a balloon. If you have ever seen the footage from the Hindenburg Disaster you can see it has a large metal frame that supported it, which made it a rigid dirigible. I hope that helps answer your question (which I realize after writing this was from 4 years ago, haha).
+1
level 28
Jan 8, 2012
"Rigid dirigible" has a sort of ring to it... actually I was wondering the same thing.
+2
level 73
Jul 24, 2013
Sounds like a punk band.
+1
level 23
Jul 12, 2018
rerigididible?
+1
level 77
Jan 9, 2012
Got the chemistry ones thanks to "Breaking Bad."
+1
level 16
Jan 9, 2012
couldn't spell daguerreotype
+1
level 44
Jan 18, 2012
@kevinj, no you are not, I also thought of Watchmen - Who Watches The Watchmen?
+1
level 73
Dec 8, 2014
I watched Watchmen. A bunch of times. Great movie. Especially the director's cut.
+2
level 49
Dec 8, 2014
It was alright, but changing the ending was a huge mistake.
+2
level 73
Dec 8, 2014
Beg to differ. Keeping the ending would have been a huge mistake. The movie's ending was much better than the comic book. Giant robot squid? c'mon...
+1
level 37
Mar 22, 2012
Could another answer for the yoga question be "Bikram"?
+1
level 68
Nov 26, 2014
I thought the same thing initially, but Bikram is actual yoga, not yoga-like.
+1
level 37
Nov 6, 2012
I seriously couldn't come up with Mason jar? I tried Ball jar and Kerr jar. *sigh*
+1
level 22
Jul 15, 2013
Both Ball and Kerr are brand names of mason jars.
+1
level 65
Dec 11, 2014
I tried 'Jam jar'
+1
level 67
Feb 7, 2017
I couldn't think of anything but ball jar, might be due to my son going to Ball St.
+1
level 73
Jan 27, 2013
Did Bowie invent the Bowie knife? Or was he just famous for using one?
+1
level 73
Oct 30, 2015
There were several versions of the long knife which Bowie made famous in the Sandbar fight, and there are many legends concerning who made the knife he carried that day and later at the Alamo. Some believe blacksmith James Black made the most well-known version from a design by Jim Bowie, others say Jesse Clift's version was the one which became well-known, several Louisiana blacksmiths made knives for the Bowie family which were similar in shape, and Bowie's brother Rezin claimed he first made the knife used in the Sandbar fight and gave it to his brother to carry for protection. We'll probably never know who made the first knife which Jim carried that day which made him famous, or which one he carried with him at the Battle of the Alamo, but at the least it could be agreed that Jim Bowie is the "inventor" of the name and legend attached to that particular style of knife. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowie_knife
+4
level 45
Sep 7, 2017
Actually, that's incorrect, the Bowie knife was invented by David Bowie. He needed a large knife to intimidate producers with, and switchblades were going out of fashion. So he decided to go bigger, went into the studio and summoned up a giant knife with his powers of glam and freaky magic. Little known fact.
+1
level 71
Feb 24, 2014
What are the chances of accepting Kilner jar for we non-Americans? Both were invented by the Kilner family in the UK, but they're known as Kilner jars over here.
+1
level ∞
Oct 22, 2014
Okay, that will work now.
+1
level 69
Apr 25, 2014
Got everything but Venn, Sousa, Bowie and Gatling. Got Rorschach at the first try, to my everlasting surprise, and Kalashnikov on the second (wrote CH at first). I was very glad to be French when I saw Daguerre, Braille and Foucault, though! Nice quiz, I learned a lot with this one!
+1
level 63
May 18, 2014
Spent ages on the machine gun one, kept on trying Maxim. Eventually I got it, but a look on Wikipedia says that the Maxim gun does fit!
+1
level 74
Dec 8, 2014
Your are correct. My first guess, too. The Maxim was in use before the turn of the century. Since it was fully automatic, and not hand-cranked like the Gatling, it fits the question better in light of the modern definition of machine gun.
+1
level 46
Dec 8, 2014
Maxim is a good fit. Could also be the M1895 Colt-Browning machine gun. All three of the above were invented in the 19th century and named for their inventors.
+1
level ∞
Sep 12, 2017
Added "with a crank" to the description.
+1
level 74
Jun 10, 2014
23/24 because I left the "s" off of Pilates
+2
level 79
Oct 23, 2014
But (in)famous though he is, I don't think anything was ever named after poor Pontius
+1
level 66
Jul 19, 2016
Kept spelling the flask as "erlanmeyer", "erlanmayer", and every variation until I finally got it.
+1
level 78
Jun 27, 2014
Zambini... zambini.. it's something like that... nope..
+1
level 50
Jul 3, 2014
It's ZOOMBINIS! Sorry, I just couldn't resist.
+1
level 35
Dec 9, 2014
I tried at least 5 variations of zambini.... And took me forever to spell Rohrshach right...think I'm back to wrong already
+1
level 73
Jul 12, 2018
I'm embarrassed to admit my first try was Gambini. I just watched My Cousin Vinny.
+1
level 56
Dec 8, 2014
I got two by taking wild guesses at the bowie knife clue.
+1
level 64
Dec 8, 2014
Joseph-Ignace Gullotin did not invent the guillotine. Someone already had. He only suggested it should be used as a humane killing method in France.
+1
level 74
Dec 8, 2014
I've never heard of raincoat called a Mackintosh. Everything else was pretty easy (except for some of the spellings...)
+1
level 67
Jul 12, 2018
Yeah I've never heard of it either
+1
level 62
Jul 12, 2018
It's a very common term in Britain, often shortened to just "mack."
+1
level 65
Jul 13, 2018
Or 'Mac'
+1
level 34
Dec 8, 2014
Got Erlenmeyer Flask thanks to Walter White.
+1
level 60
Dec 9, 2014
Never heard of a Sousaphone, but a Saxophone (which isn't a marching band instrument, I know) was named for someone named Sachs. (Apparently not, wikipedia says Sax!)
+2
level 63
Mar 1, 2015
Adolphe Sax did invent the saxophone for marching bands!
+1
level 66
Jul 12, 2018
Surely a sousaphone is a Liverpudlian communication device
+1
level 36
Dec 14, 2014
Wish I hadn't labored over "tommy" gun.
+1
level 73
Jul 19, 2016
Invented by John T. Thompson - but not until the 20th century (1918).
+1
level 48
May 30, 2016
The talbotype is another early photographic process (1841, just two years after the daguerreotype) also named after its inventor
+1
level 59
Jul 19, 2016
I still got it right but you should accept Maxim gun for 19th century machine gun. The Maxim was a true machine gun that was gas powered instead of hand crank of the Gatling.
+1
level 55
Feb 7, 2017
Agree, and it even has a cool rhyme to go with it
+1
level 27
Feb 7, 2017
the Guillotine was not invented by Guillotine the idea was pushed by him for a efficient humane killing engine
+1
level 65
Jul 13, 2018
Quite correct, the implement was being used in Halifax UK and Guillotine visited it and obviously thought it a good idea:
+1
level 57
Mar 8, 2017
Not even one element?
+2
level 74
Apr 22, 2018
Elements don't tend to be invented, more discovered.
+1
level 59
Apr 12, 2017
couldn't spell sousaphone
+1
level 50
May 1, 2017
Could Gatling also be Maxim?
+1
level 29
Jun 11, 2017
For Mackintosh, I accidentally typed in Mac and I got it. I was trying to say machete for the second to last one, for some reason.
+1
level 73
Sep 7, 2017
erlyn myer could use many extra type-ins
+2
level ∞
Sep 12, 2017
Added some more variations to the many that already existed.
+1
level 73
Jul 12, 2018
thanks. helpful.
+1
level 68
Sep 7, 2017
Stupid. I couldn't get past Dewar's flask (laboratory thermos flask) instead of Erlenmeyer flask. Doh
+1
level 66
Jul 12, 2018
Consider adding Teclu and Meker for the gas burners?
+1
level 62
Jul 12, 2018
Man, I've been working with or around Erlenmeyer flasks for around 15 years and I apparently have no idea how to spell it.
+1
level 58
Jul 12, 2018
+1 here if Urza's Destiny's set symbol helped you remember Erlenmeyer Flask.
+1
level 63
Jul 12, 2018
I'm disappointed there are no complaints about the definition of a sandwich!
+1
level 65
Jul 13, 2018
Does a filling between two pieces of bread make you feel better?
+1
level 72
Jul 12, 2018
Argh! Tried "Bowey" but not "Bowie"!
+1
level 43
Jul 12, 2018
Never heard of a Graham Cracker before, seems like most people have though!
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