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Things with Geographic Names #1

Guess the "geographic" answer that goes with each group of words.
For example: Checkers, Zodiac, Water Torture = Chinese
Quiz by Quizmaster
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First submittedAugust 22, 2010
Last updatedAugust 30, 2018
Times taken59,983
Rating3.99
5:00
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Clue
Answer
Fries, Press, Vanilla
French
Yogurt, Gods, Salad
Greek
Baked Beans, Tea Party, Strangler
Boston
Cheese, Watch, Chocolate
Swiss
Tea Ceremony, Spider Crab, Animation
Japanese
Bridge, Underground, Fog
London
Jiu Jitsu, Steakhouse, Bikini Wax
Brazilian
Gold Rush, Condor, Roll
California
Deep-Dish Pizza, Blues, Loop
Chicago
Shepherd, Measles, Chocolate
German
Clue
Answer
Isles, Petroleum, Bulldog
British
Coffee, Apricot, Baths
Turkish
Setter, Car Bomb, Potato Famine
Irish
Jerk, Bobsled Team, Ginger
Jamaican
Envelope, Clam, Folder
Manila
Rice, Jumping Beans, Hat Dance
Mexican
Bacon, Rockies, Geese
Canadian
Dream, Bison, Express
American
Numerals, Candle, Forum
Roman
Inquisition, Flu, Armada
Spanish
+7
level 46
Mar 31, 2014
Well not to be picky, but they're Canada Geese, not Canadian.
+1
level ∞
Mar 31, 2014
Suppose you're right, but most people call them Canadian Geese even if it's incorrect. Frankly, Canadian Geese just sounds better.
+2
level 58
Apr 10, 2014
It's definitely a Canada Goose, but I'm not sure if it's Canadian when pluralized. (Here we just call them Geese)
+6
level 61
Sep 26, 2016
I've never heard anyone in Canada call them "Canadian geese". A Canadian goose is just a goose who happens to be a resident of Canada. The species is definitely "Canada Goose".
+2
level 35
Apr 11, 2018
nope.... canada geese sounds much more proper and is easier to say
+1
level 53
Jun 17, 2018
*cobra chickens
+1
level 67
Jun 29, 2018
Yup - Canada goose.
+6
level 67
Jul 28, 2015
It's not picky to point out the correct answer.
+1
level 57
Apr 11, 2018
An interesting puzzle of human language.......At what point does the incorrect usage become correct. Most people I know here in Michigan say "Canadian Geese," even though that is incorrect. So if most people use the incorrect usage, does that not become the standard usage over time? Hmm......
+1
level 54
Jun 18, 2019
Less so nowadays when things have fixed spellings and words are documented and we have dictionaries. It used to evolve a lot in the time where most people didnt know how to read or write.
+1
level 69
Jun 29, 2018
What about the ones in Québec, how do they feel about that?
+7
level 73
Apr 7, 2014
Wow...I wasn't expecting the Spanish Inquisition...
+17
level 58
Apr 10, 2014
Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition.
+3
level 39
Apr 10, 2014
WHY ISN'T THERE A LIKE BUTTON???
+2
level 65
Oct 8, 2017
We've got little hearts now :)
+1
level 76
Apr 10, 2014
hm... this looks very familiar. How about at least an idea credit?
Got 100%. Never knew that Manila folders and envelopes actually were named for Manila. But I looked it up today for the first time.
+5
level 56
Apr 10, 2014
Because the idea doesn't belong to you, perhaps?
+2
level ∞
Apr 10, 2014
Yeah this is a reboot of a quiz that is almost 4 years old. It's actually a series of four quizzes, which I completely redid. In fact, I did credit you for one question in the sequel.
+1
level 76
Apr 11, 2014
Okay. Seems like this one is a lot closer than the sequel. I don't remember seeing it before or maybe the original version just looked a lot different or had different answers. Hard to do a search for something like this to check against redundancy.

Quizzler, you honestly have nothing better to do?
+2
level 72
Sep 29, 2016
Says who?
+2
level 42
Apr 10, 2014
Isn't it an English bulldog?
+2
level 34
Apr 10, 2014
its British
+2
level 64
Apr 10, 2014
I've never heard "British bulldog." I've always heard American Bulldog and English bulldog.
+2
level 21
Sep 26, 2016
British bulldog is a game. It's like red rover, but with tackling.
+2
level 59
Sep 26, 2016
^ And French bulldogs; don't forget those. But definitely never British. So thank you, ChaosQuizzer (and others), for enlightening those of us who were super confused. Had no idea British bulldog was a game!
+1
level 58
Jan 30, 2015
"British Bulldog" is a game or sport of some sort (I'm hazy about it myself, despite being British). So it's a valid phrase for this quiz. Also a British Bulldog might be a synomym for a certain kind of British person like Winston Churchill. The phrase is correct even if it doesn't apply to an actual dog.
+1
level 67
Jul 28, 2015
There actually was a board game called British Bulldog back in the mid-1970s...I had it. (This was in the US, too.)
+1
level 28
Apr 10, 2014
Car bomb = Irish... lol
+3
level 82
Apr 11, 2014
It's the name of a drink. And without knowing that context, it wouldn't be remotely funny.
+1
level 75
Feb 18, 2015
I'm not Irish but I think a better and less offensive clue could be substituted.
+2
level ∞
Mar 31, 2016
I've heard that Irish people can be touchy about that beverage. I personally like to call it an "Irish Cultural Respect Drink".

Nevertheless, Ireland is a wonderful country with wonderful people.

+1
level 76
Sep 26, 2016
^not so wonderful having to share a hostel with them.
+1
level 59
Sep 26, 2016
^ I didn't find it that bad, except for the couple hostels that didn't have even instant coffee in the morning. And unless it's changed in the last seven years, it is nearly impossible to find some place that serves coffee that is open before 11:00 am, and that's being generous. Drove me crazy. Other than that, I loved Ireland.
+1
level 76
Sep 26, 2016
I just had a bad night recently at a hostel in Cracow.
+1
level 43
Apr 11, 2014
Got 20 out of 20.
+2
level 56
Apr 11, 2014
'American Sign Language' is a bit of a pointless one, nearly all developed nations have a unique sign language associated with it, therefore it doesn't help at all with getting the answer.
+1
level 44
Apr 12, 2014
Maybe "Pie" would be a better clue - referencing the series of movies?
+1
level ∞
Mar 31, 2016
Changed that clue
+1
level 49
Apr 15, 2014
I got all but "Turkish."
+1
level 39
Oct 7, 2014
Got all but "Chicago"... Deep-Dish Pizza I would think would be from NY or Italy
+1
level 60
Sep 26, 2016
Got all but Chicago too. Darn it.
+1
level 49
Feb 1, 2015
took me a minute to get the one with the wax.. how can I be so stupid lol got all the rest easily enough :)
+2
level 75
Feb 18, 2015
It's the only one I missed. I kept thinking Jiu Jitsu was some type of Asian martial arts. North Korean Bikini Wax, anyone?
+1
level 68
Jun 29, 2018
You're not wrong on that. It's originally a Japanese martial art, but the Brazilian version (which is well known today thanks to its success in MMA) is sort of descended from it.
+1
level 58
Feb 20, 2015
If I was irish, I would be quite angry ^^ Car bomb is their speciality !?
+1
level 68
Jun 29, 2018
It's a drink, consisting of Irish cream, whiskey, and Guinness. Is it offensive? Perhaps, but as an American of Irish descent I don't find it nearly as obnoxious as the stereotypes of Irish people as drunken and belligerent.
+1
level 44
Sep 21, 2016
Two L's should be allowed for Manila. Ridiculous!
+1
level 21
Sep 26, 2016
Vanilla Manila :)
+1
level 21
Sep 26, 2016
How about Turkish Delight? yum :P
+1
level 62
Sep 26, 2016
French fries are Belgian, the French press is Italian and vanilla definitely doesn't grow in France, I wonder how Americans pick up their words...
+1
level 71
Sep 26, 2016
And the English horn is neither English nor a horn; it got the name "English" because the German word for "Angelic" resembles the word for "English." Similarly the Jerusalem artichoke has nothing to do with that place; "Jerusalem" is a corruption of "girasole," the Italian word for "sunflower." So let's not fret too much about how words get misapplied, much less bash any particular group for mistakes like these; after all it was the Brits who turned "Livorno" into "Leghorn" and transformed "quelque chose" into "kickshaws."
+1
level 76
Sep 26, 2016
I've thought about doing a quiz of the origins of foods that are named for places other than their place of origin, though the french fries thing is a bit contentious. I started another quiz on foods with disputed origins (France does actually have a claim), but never finished it.
+1
level 54
Jun 18, 2019
french fries are definitely not belgian, belgian fries looks totally different! French fries are like half a cm max, more like 0.3 normal fries are like 0.8-1 cm and belgian (flemish) fries 1.5-2 cm !(sometimes almost resembling potato wedges and sometimes the skin is left on)

The word french fries most likely came into being not because it was the place it was invented. But referring to the way of cutting things. A french cut (of the potatos) .French cut is the same as jullienne a term that is often used to slice vegetables in strips (the place of invention has been disputed)

+1
level 52
Sep 26, 2016
Rather surprised that so few people got Manila - even if you don't know the city, I thought manila envelopes were more widely known.
+1
level 32
Sep 26, 2016
Kept trying Manilla, guessing I'm not alone. But still wrong.
+1
level 22
Sep 26, 2016
100% in 2 minutes
+1
level 63
Nov 7, 2018
4:04 here.
+1
level 43
Sep 27, 2016
I have lived in Boston my whole life and it was the only one I missed :(
+1
level 48
Jul 21, 2017
It's Nashua Street for you.
+1
level 23
Sep 28, 2016
Turkish delight?
+1
level 61
Nov 4, 2016
Not Turkish TAFFY?
+1
level 51
Feb 19, 2017
Ah yes... Jamaican bobsled team comes from "Cool Runnings". :)
+1
level 54
Jun 19, 2019
you know, jamaica actually hás a bobsledteam. In real life, since 1988. That was actually what the movie was based on. So it is the other way around..
+1
level 59
Apr 5, 2017
The Irish will forever be known as car bombers, lol.
+1
level 57
May 21, 2017
Doesn't accept English for Bulldog?
+1
level 74
Jul 9, 2017
Bit harsh on the Irish lol
+1
level 48
Jul 21, 2017
For fog and underground, I was thinking "velvet." Bridge got me to London.
+1
level 69
Apr 11, 2018
It's a bit odd for current Brits to have London associated with fog. That goes back more than 60 years to the time of coal fires. It's still polluted - by cars - but it isn't foggy.
+1
level 44
Feb 11, 2019
I've only heard of an English Bulldog, never British. Threw me off for a second.
+1
level 37
Apr 17, 2019
Jamaican bobsled team - this clue made me laugh. Cool Runnings is an absolutely hilarious movie, but I never thought it would enter into this. Still, it was what made me get Jamaican.
+1
level 54
Jun 19, 2019
I cant find any info/reference on german chocolate being "a thing". Belgian chocolate however is ( as is swiss) and you have a belgian shephard (slightly less famous than a german shepherd). For a moment I thought you might have accidentally switched them. But apparently german measles is a thing (was unfamiliar with it myself) and belgian measles isnt.

So belgian does not seem to fit as the answer either. But as it is the current answer seems to be incorrect. (perhaps you were thinking of german chocolate cake? which ís "a thing" which by the way is not named for/after germany either but someone with the lastname "German" it was his recipe.)