Take another quiz >

Top 10 U.S. States with the Most Expensive Home Prices

Can you guess the states of the U.S.A. that have the highest median home values?
According to zillow.com as of November 14, 2018
Based on the estimated value of all homes, whether they are for sale or not
Last updated: November 14, 2018
Rate:
2:00
Enter state here
0
 / 10 guessed
The quiz is paused. You have remaining.
Scoring
You scored / = %
This beats or equals % of test takers
The average score is
Your high score is
Your best time is remaining
Keep scrolling down for answers and more stats ...
Home Value
State
$619,000
Hawaii
$544,900
California
$401,500
Massachusetts
$375,200
Washington
$368,100
Colorado
Home Value
State
$338,300
Oregon
$321,200
New Jersey
$320,900
Utah
$310,200
Alaska
$285,400
Maryland
+1
level 80
Sep 14, 2016
Makes much sense.
+3
level 58
Sep 14, 2016
As a homeowner in one of the ten, it's nice to know I'm above average. Unfortunately, if I sell, I'll have to move to a cheaper state.
+4
level 52
Nov 30, 2016
Let me get this straight: "Fortunately, I live in an expensive house. Unfortunately, if I move to a different state I would have to sell my expensive house and buy a less expensive house."
+4
level 65
Nov 30, 2016
Meaning that although they would get above market value for their existing house, it might not be enough to rebuy a house in the same state. A very likely occurrence for owner's of older properties.
+7
level ∞
Nov 14, 2018
@CMJ's point is a good one. If you bought a house in Seattle in 1990 then you are rich on paper. But the only way to capture that wealth is to sell the house and move out of state. In the mean time, you get to enjoy paying $8,000 a year in property tax.
+1
level 70
Dec 22, 2018
@Quizmaster: not necessarily. You can always reverse mortgage your expensive house and use the proceeds for other purposes without selling your home.
+1
level 71
Oct 18, 2017
Only if you want to buy bigger or in a better location
+1
level 56
Sep 14, 2016
shocked by the answer to 266,400
+1
level 46
Nov 30, 2016
Why would you not just write Alaska!? :S
+8
level 64
Nov 30, 2016
Avoiding spoiler?!
+1
level 75
Nov 30, 2016
To keep the cheaters who read the comments from getting the answer.
+2
level 29
Jul 17, 2018
or new york
+2
level 67
Nov 30, 2016
Not really shocking if you visit. Everything is expensive there. Median incomes are also high in Alaska.
+1
level 74
Nov 14, 2018
Even less shocking if you live there. There's a chronic housing shortage in northern communities, in both the USA and Canada. Can't speak to Greenland, but I suspect it's similar.
+1
level 68
Sep 15, 2016
Surprised to see Alaska there. Is it because a lot of building materials need to be imported? Surely the land itself is quite cheap?
+1
level 69
Sep 15, 2016
Probably, maybe also why Hawaii is up at the top. I wonder if it's also considered to be "exotic" to live in Hawaii, driving up the cost
+5
level 54
Nov 30, 2016
Costs skyrocket when EVERYTHING must be imported.
+8
level 65
Nov 30, 2016
Hawaii is at the top for many reasons: 1. It's a tropical paradise, 2. It's an island chain with limited land available for building houses and the land itself is extremely expensive, 3. Everything has to be imported and from a great distance, 4. Houses might need to be built to code to withstand earthquakes, typhoons, tsunamis and volcanoes. The more housing codes you have, the more expensive the final product is.
+2
level 68
Nov 30, 2016
Land in Alaska can cost a lot, as the vast majority is federal, state, or native lands.
+2
level 67
Nov 30, 2016
it's not a shortage of land, though. Even if you buy land, it is expensive to hire the labor to build something. Don't forget you might also have to build a road and pay for electric poles if you want to be on the grid.
+1
level 74
Nov 14, 2018
jamed is correct. It's not about the land, it's about materials and labour, and thinking about hookups if you're not in town. Not to mention that the terrain and weather means you can't build all year round and permafrost is a logistical consideration.
+4
level 27
Dec 2, 2016
Yep. I'm from Alaska and that's exactly why. Also, the land may be cheap, but it may not have access to electricity or city water/sewer or roads. If you can do without all of those things, your house may actually be fairly inexpensive. If some developer paid for access to all that, it drives the cost up. Also labor is expensive too because high cost of living drives wages up.
+7
level 65
Sep 28, 2016
So, basically, if it touches the Pacific Ocean, you're screwed.
+1
level 55
Nov 30, 2016
yes especially when it's much lower than property prices in China, Japan or Australia
+2
level 58
Oct 25, 2016
+1
level 69
Nov 21, 2016
All of these are bordered by water, except CO. So the next best thing after the beach is epic mountains. ...makes sense. Except i'd choose mountains over the beach any day.
+4
level 32
Nov 30, 2016
That's why Washington is awesome, it has mountains and beaches!!
+2
level 70
Jan 2, 2017
But Colorado has sunshine all year round where Washington has rain, rain, and more rain ;-)
+1
level 74
Nov 14, 2018
Yeah but ya don't have to shovel the snow...
+2
level 54
Nov 30, 2016
Maybe I've watched too many episodes of House Hunters....
+2
level 53
Nov 30, 2016
Mostly blue states... just saying. Who are the "rich fat-cats" now?
+2
level 51
Nov 30, 2016
Blue states with the bluest parts being the places with the highest land costs eg NYC, San Francisco, Boston. Thinking people have noticed this trend. Since having families tends to induce some people to become more conservative the idea is that higher land prices = delayed family formation = more liberal population, though this theory has not been lab tested, for obvious reasons
+2
level 70
Dec 1, 2016
No it's not stupid. Liberal states create more land use restrictions, reducing housing supply, driving costs up. Obviously the choice they've made, and that's their choice to make. But it's not stupid to understand it.
+5
level 70
Jan 2, 2017
Or, you could argue (also with only correlation behind you and not causality, like most of the rest of these given "reasons") that the blue states are the more expensive states because liberals are more educated and thus can afford to live in the most costly places. See what you can do with statistics? Then again, did anyone stop to notice that the more expensive states are kinda just simply the most desirable ones? They all have natural beauty and/or a great geographical location working for them.
+3
level 35
Apr 20, 2018
Natural beauty is prevalent throughout the entirety of the USA, not just cities!? I agree with some points made here (cities are more expensive, blue states have better geographical location) but it definitely has something to do with blue states' tendencies to create legislation that has the effect of raising house prices (environmental regulations, higher housing standards, higher closing costs, land use regulations, etc.)

It has nothing to do with 'liberals are more educated' -stop being so stuck-up. Liberalism certainly is not a measure of intelligence.
+1
level 50
Mar 17, 2019
Mostly places with jobs that pay the most. So?
+1
level 80
Nov 30, 2016
I once went to San Diego and was explaining to a local couple that it's not uncommon to find smaller houses in my hometown of Des Moines for around $50,000. They would not believe me until I pulled up actual listings. Now I see why that was so shocking.
+1
level 58
Nov 30, 2016
Never remember Hawaii and Alaska for any of these. Always just darting around the lower 48 trying ever more desperate guesses - "maybe houses are really expensive in Alabama!" and then there they are, Hawaii and Alaska.
+2
level 65
Dec 1, 2016
Surprised Connecticut isn't on the list. Lots of rich NYCers reside there.
+1
level 70
Jan 2, 2017
I too was surprised about the absence of Connecticut – and also Virginia, for those same reasons you gave. (Aside from the entirety of Northern Virginia being a DC-commuter bedroom community, most of the top five counties with the highest average home prices are there.) But then I remembered that both CT and VA still have a LOT of very rural areas, and like, Mennonites and stuff. ;-D
+1
level 60
Dec 2, 2016
The median home value in Seattle is $611,500. Seattle home values have gone up 14.4% over the past year, per Zillow. We bought our place 25 years ago, before the increase. No fun thinking about moving in retirement.
+1
level 48
Nov 12, 2018
I am not surprised by this - but reminds me once again, how much cheaper houses are in the USA compared to UK. I live in a pretty average UK house - and it is probably worth around $500,000.
+2
level ∞
Nov 14, 2018
Looking at the data, you could probably explain most of this by looking at growth in a state's population. New construction is expensive, and there aren't enough old houses in fast-growing states to satisfy demand.
+1
level 72
Nov 14, 2018
So this data is just the average price of everything from studios to mansions?
+1
level 84
Nov 15, 2018
Boggles my mind how low some of these are. My tiny condo is more than most of these, makes me sad.
+1
level 16
Dec 22, 2018
Not american, but I somehow managed to get 8, do not know how?
+1
level 69
Dec 22, 2018
One theory: A quick typist can enter an awful lot of states at random in the time allotted. I suppose there is no way to factor in a penalty for incorrect answers.
+1
level 69
Dec 22, 2018
Perhaps a maximum number of "tries".
+1
level 70
Dec 22, 2018
As a Realtor, I'd love know where you got your incorrect statistics - ah, just noticed it says Zillow. I didn't bother to even try when the two states with the highest housing costs did not appear. Zillow's data is notoriously wrong. Try Realtor.com or a government site. Zillow's "zestimates" on houses not currently for sale or not sold recently are notoriously high and incorrect. It even overpriced the owner of Zillow's own home by almost $2 million dollars. The only accurate measure of value of home is comparisons to homes sold recently (banks calculate between 90 to 180 days past). The numbers you have are unsupportable.
+3
level ∞
Dec 22, 2018
Post your sources. There is no way that two states not on this list have higher average house prices than California or Hawaii. Zillow isn't always correct, but it's good enough on average.
+3
level ∞
Dec 22, 2018
Maybe you are thinking about cost/square foot, or about land prices. That would be different and obviously New York would be higher.
+1
level 71
Dec 24, 2018
I assume it is based on sale prices that Zillow has compiled (a statistic they track), rather then "Zestimates." So these numbers should be fairly accurate.
+1
level 36
Dec 24, 2018
I find it hard to believe Virginia isn't in the top ten. Homes here in Northern Virginia are SO expensive. I guess the rest of the state balance the prices.
+1
level 75
Dec 26, 2018
The suburbia/redneck frontier keeps getting pushed further west and further south (used to be Centreville and Woodbridge, now it's around Warrenton and Fredericksburg) but get past that and it gets pretty cheap. That's most of the state.
+1
level 50
Mar 17, 2019
Surprised Connecticut and Rhode Island aren't here.